Ultrarunning ציבורי
[search 0]
עוד

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
Sean Mullett was the second to last finisher at this year's Western States 100, crossing the line in 29:58. His lap around the Placer High track was the most dramatic one of the race. Hear about his experience and what led up to his struggle during that final mile, and how he recovered at the hospital in the days after. Host Scotty Sandow also talk…
 
By Andy MilroyThe forgotten man of Ultrarunning is arguably Hardy Ballington (1912-1974), lauded in 1939 in Natal, South Africa, as “the second Newton” and a “human machine”. Dominant immediately before and after the Second World War, he was awarded the prestigious Helms Trophy for his remarkable performances In England in 1937.The authoritative Lo…
 
By Davy Crockett You can read, listen, or watchProfessional ultrarunners/pedestrians of the late 1800s and early 1900s were constantly looking for endurance races or head-to-head matches to prove their abilities and make significant amounts of money. During the mid 1880s, some of them, including popular black ultrarunner Frank Hart, changed out the…
 
Ryan Montgomery is an openly queer ultrarunner and sat down to talk with Scotty about Pride Month and being a beacon for others as an athlete. Last year, he placed second at the Desert Solstice 24 hour and third in the 100-mile event. And while most of us were binge-watching Tiger King, Ryan set an unsupported FKT on the Wonderland Trail around Mt.…
 
By Davy Crockett You can read, listen, or watchThe 1978 Western States 100 was the second year the race was held. Six years earlier, seven soldiers from Fort Riley Kansas proved that the horse trail could be conquered on foot, and they were awarded with the “First Finishers on Foot” trophy by Western States founder, Wendell Robie (1895-1984). Two y…
 
By Davy Crockett You can read, listen, or watchThe Comrades Marathon (about 55 miles), held in South Africa, is the world’s largest and oldest ultramarathon race that is still held today with fields that have topped 23,000 runners.The year 2021, marked the 100th anniversary of Comrades Marathon “The Ultimate Human Race.” Because the pandemic cancel…
 
Dean Karnazes is a legend in the sport of ultrarunning, UltraRunning Magazine columnist and author of the national bestseller, Ultramarathon Man: Confessions of an All-Night Runner. His latest book, A Runner's High, is a memoir detailing Dean's experiences as an ultrarunner, his family life and training for the Western States Endurance Run in 2018.…
 
By Davy Crockett You can read, listen, or watchIn the late 1970s, Hawaii had the most runners per-capita than any other state. Some called it the “running capital of the world.” Hawaii was also an early adopter of the 100-mile race and other ultras distances races. Similar to the Fort Mead 100 in Maryland (see episode 75), Hawaii’s first 100-milers…
 
Cory Reese is an ultrarunner and well known author of two books, Nowhere Near First and Into the Furnace, as well as his column "Reese's Pieces" in UltraRunning Magazine. His third book, Stronger Than the Dark, comes out on June 8. Scotty talked with Cory about the inspiration for his new book, including his struggle with depression. Also included …
 
By Davy Crockett The Strolling Jim 40, held in Wartrace, Tennessee, is one of the top-five oldest ultras in America that is still being held to the present-day (2021). It is a road race that runs on very hilly paved and dirt roads, the brainchild of Gary Cantrell (Lazarus Lake). Because its distance is a non-standard ultra-distance of 41.2 miles, t…
 
Marshall Ulrich is an endurance athlete and ultrarunning legend with over 130 ultra finishes. He recently crossed Death Valley for the 30th time on foot in February when he set out to raise money in honor of his friend and teammate, Mark Macy. Macy is a long-time friend and recently competed on Amazon’s World's Toughest Race: Eco-Challenge Fiji wit…
 
By Davy Crockett Episode 75 introduced the Fort Meade 100 held in Maryland from 1978-1989. Lost in the Fort Meade history of the late 1970s was the fact that it also attracted Centurion racewalkers who attempted to walk 100 miles in less than 24-hours. It was reported, “Some participants were walkers engaged in an odd-looking sport of walking heel-…
 
Ultrarunner Duane Konyn recounts his medevac rescue while running the Bigfoot 200 in 2019 in Washington state. Konyn suffered a rare but life-threatening injury after passing the 150-mile mark of the 200-mile race. He talks to Scotty about the details of his medical condition and the helicopter and medical crew that came to his rescue, not to menti…
 
By Davy Crockett This is a bonus episode about the Fort Meade races covered in episode 75.In the 1970s, a 24-hour relay craze took place at high schools, colleges and running clubs. By 1972, Runner's World Magazine, in Mountain View, California, was publishing results along with some standardized rules for these relays participated by hundreds of r…
 
By Davy Crockett Park Barner at Fort MeadeDuring the 1960s and 1970s, most of the 100-mile races were held on oval tracks. Additionally, 100 miles were achieved during 24-hours races, usually also held on tracks. Running for 100 miles on an oval track seemed like an extreme oddity back then, even as it does today.During that period, there were 19 k…
 
Have you had hallucinations while running an ultra? Scotty sat down with Van "Pigtails" Phan, Tim White, Jason Wagner and Bev Anderson-Abbs to get their personal hallucination stories which range from humorous to very scary. He also spoke with Dr. Jay Sanguinetti about why ultrarunners are more prone to having hallucinations and how they can be pre…
 
Beverley Anderson-Abbs is a recent winner of the Jed Smith 50-miler in Sacramento, CA. After suffering from overtraining syndrome and briefly being unable to even walk, Bev rebounded to finish with an American and Canadian age group record. New URM host Scotty Sandow sits down with Bev to discuss her experience running The Last Annual Heart of the …
 
By Davy Crockett 1978 was the year when more 100-mile and 24-hour races started to be established in the United States. In 1976, Tom Osler of New Jersey brought renewed American ultrarunning attention to the 24-hour run when he ran a solo 24-hour run on that track at Glassboro State College where he was teaching. (see episode 67). Enthusiasm for at…
 
By Davy Crockett 1978 was a year when new road 100-milers started to spring up across America, put on by independent race directors. Most of these races were available for the non-elite long-distance runners to give the epic distance a try. These 100-milers were held in Hawaii, California, New Jersey, Maryland, Missouri. One race in particular was …
 
By Davy Crockett During the early 1970s, the majority of the American ultramarathons were held in the eastern states, including 100-milers. But by the late ‘70s, a western migration was taking place and soon the state of California was holding the most ultras. Ultrarunners learned about races mostly by word-of-mouth from other runners who they woul…
 
"Tropical" John Medinger has been involved in the sport of ultrarunning since 1981, when the first issue of UltraRunning Magazine was published. His impact has been widespread - from the Western States president to publisher of UR, to founder of some of the sport's most notable races including Quad Dipsea and Lake Sonoma 50. Needless to say, he's e…
 
By Davy Crockett The 1977 Western States 100Andy GonzalesIn 1977, Wendell T. Robie (1895-1984), the president of the Western States Trail Foundation and the director of the Western States Trail Ride (Tevis Cup), decided that it was time to add a runner division to his famous Ride. For more than two decades this 100-mile endurance horse race had bee…
 
By Davy Crockett Walks and runs across Death Valley, in California during the hot summer started as early as 1966 when Jean Pierre Marquant (1938-) from Nice, France accomplished a 102-mile loop around the valley that included climbing two of the high mountains. (see episode 62).This started a Death Valley hiking and running frenzy in the lowest an…
 
By Davy Crockett In the 1970s, the sport of ultrarunning received very little attention in the mainstream media. In April 1974, Park Barner from Pennsylvania, the top ultrarunner in America at the time, did appear on a local television show. The episode was entitled, “The Loneliness of the Ultra-Distance Runner.” He also later was on CBS's PM Magaz…
 
By Davy Crockett Since the dawn of the sport of ultrarunning more than a century ago, a unique breed of ultrarunner has existed which I will call the "self-promoter." They were skilled in using their running talents to gain fame and fortune, mostly by doing "stunts" rather than participating in competitions. There is nothing inherently wrong with s…
 
By Davy Crockett In the early 1970s, several highly competitive 100-mile races had been held in England, but they were still primarily organized for attempts to break British or world records. In 1975 another classic race was held, perhaps one of the greatest and most competitive 100-mile race ever held. It left one reporter speechless, witnessing …
 
Jeff Stern recently set the FKT on the Backbone Trail in Southern California. After most of his races were canceled this year, he completed extensive research and proper scouting on the the trail in order to go for the FKT. In this episode, we talked about his background as an athlete, what it takes to prepare, and what he learned from his first FK…
 
By Davy Crockett 1974 is the year that most American ultrarunners unfortunately think 100-mile ultrarunning history began. Hopefully the previous twelve parts of this 100 miler history, including 80,000 words of previous history, has helped readers learn about the forgotten 100-mile history.This brings us to 1974. Several 100-mile races and solo ru…
 
UR columnist Gary Cantrell (Lazarus Lake) took on an unexpected and exciting new race format this summer that ended up being one of the biggest of his career. This podcast episode began as a column and turned into a conversation about the Great Virtual Race Across Tennessee (GVRAT), Big's Backyard and more.…
 
By Davy Crockett During the 1970s, the modern-era of ultrarunning was slowly increasing. The term “ultramarathon” (“ultra” for short) was introduced by legendary Ted Corbitt about 1957 and by the early 1970s it was being used more often to make the distinction with the public that athletes could run further than the marathon distance.100-mile races…
 
By Davy Crockett As the 1970s began, for the first time in decades, daring pioneer long-distance women athletes again joined in the 100-mile quest, with some opposition because of the lack of public acceptance for women to compete in long distances.By 1970, the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) was governing American amateur running and working to prepa…
 
Loading …

מדריך עזר מהיר

זכויות יוצרים 2021 | מפת אתר | מדיניות פרטיות | תנאי השירות
Google login Twitter login Classic login