Saxon ציבורי
[search 0]
עוד

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Anglo-Saxon England is a podcast looking at the history of Anglo-Saxon England, beginning with the end of Roman Britain and ending with the Norman Conquest. We will not only talk about the history but also the literature, culture, and historiography of the Anglo-Saxon period. This show strives to offer an accessible but scholarly rigorous overview that will appeal both to beginners and to experts.
 
The Wanderer. This is a podcast for Anglo-Saxon Heathenism. We will discuss subjects such as Yggdrasil, the world tree, the Anglo Saxon Runes, The people who were alive at the time when Heathenism was the only religion open to them, how the people worshipped their gods, and which gods were most popular to different sections of Anglo Saxon Society. This is a PayPal link if anyone wants to donate a dollar or a pound to help keep the podcast going. paypal.me/EnglishFightingArts
 
Do the Anglo-Saxons still have relevance? Do they really matter? I’d like to posit that they do, and in this podcast, we'll be hearing directly from the Anglo-Saxons themselves in order to better understand who these people were and how they viewed the world around them. Join me, as we read from Bede's Ecclesiastical History, Alfred's Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Beowulf, and more.
 
Loading …
show series
 
The Anglo-Saxons prised wisdom. It permeated every aspect of their culture and they created an elaborate literature of wisdom meant to convey both profound truths and practical knowledge. In this bonus episode we take an overview of Old English wisdom literature; its characteristics and subjects, and we also talk a bit about gnomes. Learn more at P…
 
Ragnar Lodbrok(Old Norse Ragnarr Loðbrók, also anglicized as Ragnar Lodbrok), whose epithet means 'Hairy-breeches' or 'Shaggy-breeches', was a legendary Viking king, with Old Norse sagas, poetry, and medieval Latin sources telling of his accomplishments in Scandinavia, Francia, and Anglo-Saxon England during the 9th century CE. Commonly occurring e…
 
The period between Cynegil’s baptism in 636 and the rise of Cædwalla in 685 is one in which the political history of the Gewisse becomes extremely complicated. This is because the political structure of the Gewisse that had developed by this time was one in which any male heir of Cerdic was entitled to claim the throne. Thus while the Anglo-Saxon C…
 
'Heroic’ isn’t a term the Anglo-Saxons used, rather it refers to a general type of poetry dealing with heroes, men who live by a code and put their lives at risk upholding said code while performing marvellous deeds. The heroic ethos in Old English literature is not just one thig, rather it’s a collection of related ideas and tendencies that togeth…
 
Our first secure historical date for the people who became the West Saxons occurred at some point in the 630s when a missionary called Birinus baptised their king, Cynegils, at his royal palace near Dorchester on Thames. According to traditions which circulated among later generations of West Saxons they already had a century of history prior to th…
 
Now available on Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/anglosaxonengland) Old English poetry can be grim, but why? And is it as grim as it seems? In this second bonus episode I consider why so much Old English poetry is focused on death and loss and look at the deeper cultural tendencies that shaped the Anglo-Saxon's attitudes to life and joy. Learn mor…
 
Following the Battle of Ellendun, Mercia entered an uncertain new phase in its history. No longer the supreme power in England, it was forced to regroup and rebuild amid dynastic strife and encroaching threats from without. It would survive for only a further half century after Beornwulf's death, but rather than being solely a time of decline, that…
 
The pub name “The Green Man,” then, seems to have originated in the 17th century and to have referred in its earliest forms to the leaf-covered Green Man common in 16th-century pageantry. As we've seen, Lady Raglan was drawing on this tradition when she named the foliate head “Green Man.” Glance upwards as you approach or enter many of Britain’s gr…
 
The Mercian Supremacy collapsed within just five years of Coenwulf's death, a dramatic reversal of fortune. Why did this happen and what role did the political instability which gripped Mercia at this time play in the course of events? This episode, follow me as we look at how something as successful as Mercia could come crashing down in such a sho…
 
In this episode we look at the reign of the last king of the Mercian Supremacy: Coenwulf. We look at how he rebuilt a fractured Mercian dominion in the wake of Offa's death, how he struggled to incorporate the Church into his overlordship, and how a 10th C legend about his son's death was used to explain the whole collapse of the Mercian supremacy …
 
Tamworth in Staffordshire proudly announces it's history as 'capital of the kingdom of Mercia' to all who visit. In this episode we look at the history of the town and how it's origins as a major royal site rest decisively with King Offa, who cemented its place in history as the heart of Mercia. Credits – Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening http…
 
Reasonable Force A person may use such force as is reasonable in the circumstances for the purposes of (in the alternative): - self-defence; defence of another; defence of property; prevention of crime; lawful arrest. In assessing the reasonableness of the force used, prosecutors should ask two questions: was the use of force necessary in the circu…
 
Offa of Mercia is one of the great figures of Anglo-Saxon history. Casually known in English textbooks, his true greatness is often only alluded to. He was a great visionary king who aspired to remake the political system of Mercia, to centralise it, and even to found an empire in Britain. Credits – Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening https://ww…
 
Athelbald of Mercia was yet another Anglo-Saxon king to return from exile and rejuvenate a stagnating kingdom. More than any king we've discussed so far, he fundamentally altered the way politics in his kingdom worked through daring use of royal power to cement the position of the king of Mercia as a legal warrior diplomat at the head of an economi…
 
After Penda's death in 655, Mercia faced a grim future. Cowed by a dominant Northumbria and ruled by a puppet king there seemed to be little hope for the people of march. But, in the shadows, nobles plotted with Penda's second-born. The puppet was killed and when Oswiu's attention was elsewhere, they raised their banner in rebellion to expel the No…
 
Penda's career is one of the most dramatic in Anglo-Saxon history yet very little is known about him apart from what others tell us about him. In this episode I cut through the uncertainty to give you a glimpse of this man, what he accomplished, and how he not only helped forge a singular Mercian identity but also set the stage for future Mercian s…
 
A Choice of Anglo-Saxon Verse contains the Old English texts of all the major short poems, such as 'The Battle of Maldon', 'The Dream of the Rood', 'The Wanderer', and 'The Seafarer', as well as a generous representation of the many important fragments, riddles and gnomic verses that survive from the seventh to the twelfth centuries, with facing-pa…
 
Robin Hood was the legendary bandit of England who stole from the rich to help the poor. The stories about Robin appealed to common folk because he stood up against—and frequently outwitted—people in power. Furthermore, his life in the forest—hunting, and feasting with his fellow outlaws, coming to the assistance of those in need—seemed like a grea…
 
Mercia, the kingdom which grew out of the English Midlands, dominated England south of the Humber from the 620s until its final fall in the late 800s. It was a military and cultural powerhouse for much of that time, yet its origins are mysterious, even more mysterious than those of the other Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. In this episode, we begin our look …
 
The collapse of Northumbria in the ninth century was a result of long standing crises being compacted by the sudden arrival of a new threat the likes of which they could not have imagined. The memory of Northumbria would echo down the centuries, but as the smoke cleared a whole world had come to an end and the future seemed more ominous than ever. …
 
A 48‐line fragmentary poem in Old English dealing with part of the tragic tale of Finn and Hildeburh, a later part of which is sung by the scôp in Beowulf, II. 1,063–1,159. The fragment is included by F. Klaeber in his edition of Beowulf (1922, etc.) and in other editions. The fragment of the Finnsburh poem and the Finnsburh reference in Beowulf so…
 
Even as its glory days slipped into the past, Northumbria was still able to produce one last great mind who would have a profound impact on the rest of the world. Alcuin of York came from an obscure family but would go on to find success in the court of Emperor Charlemagne as one of his advisors and teachers. Here he would help formulate new standa…
 
This episode, ahead of the big episode on the Northumbrian collapse, we take a break from politics to look at one of the most important artefacts from Anglo-Saxon England: the Lindisfarne Gospels. It is my hope that this episode will give you a grounding in the history and features of this remarkable manuscript. I think you will agree that the deta…
 
After Osred's death in 716, Northumbria entered a period of political upheaval which eventually saw the emergence of a new dynasty to claim the throne. This family, descendants of Leodwald, quickly achieved prominence during a period of peaceful foreign relations and cultural dynamism. But just as quickly as they rose, equally quickly they fell bac…
 
This episode of the Wanderer has David Casserly as a guest. David Casserly was born and brought up in Bolton where he still lives. His first book "Massacre, The Storming of Bolton" published in 2011, came after a lifelong fascination with the subject and in learning the facts behind the story. He is a guest speaker for Blackpool and Fylde College o…
 
Mead was a very important part of a heathens civilization and culture. It helps define their leisure time and identity as a people and thus gets a prominent role in their stories and myths. Mead is no different from the Northern peoples during the Viking age. So important, in fact, that they use the drink as essentially a metaphor for how the inspi…
 
This week we look at fallout of Nechtansmere and the end of Athelfrithing domination of Northumbrian politics. Ironically, this coincided with one of the more famous kings of the dynasty, famed for his wisdom and piety. But wisdom and piety cannot save a crumbling powerbase or end subjugation to external powers. Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdeni…
 
Woden was a war god, and he appeared in heroic literature as the protector of heroes; fallen warriors joined him in Valhalla. The wolf and the raven were dedicated to him. His magical horse, Sleipnir had eight legs, teeth inscribed with runes, and the ability to gallop through the air and over the sea. Woden was the great magician among the gods an…
 
This episode is very short, but It is a fun episode that talks about the Teutonic Knights fighting the Undead, This article is presented as fact from the sources I read. It is clearly complete fantasy but it was a great read. Unfortunately, I can no longer find this information on the internet. But I hope you enjoy the episode.…
 
This episode is a short talk about the quarterstaff, it discusses some of the histories of the staff, and some of the people that used the staff as a weapon of defense. We go through a brief explanation of how the staff has progressed down through the ages to modern times. The name "quarterstaff" is first attested in the mid-16th century. George Si…
 
Swords were enormously expensive weapons 1,500 years ago, and the Anglo Saxon warriors of those times needed a blade that could be used for everyday work and double as a fighting knife or sword. They and warriors of many other Northern European cultures chose the seax, which can be considered either a large dagger or a short single-edged sword. The…
 
This week we meet the single most important Anglo-Saxon scholar of them all. Bede lived an extremely quiet life, but his intellectual world was fantastically productive. He produced works which provided the the framework for all subsequent English scholarship and fully established the Anglo-Saxons on a world stage as a people capable of producing e…
 
This episode is a talk by Guy Windsor. I try to include many different kinds of things in this podcast rather than keep rehashing stuff that has already been done. I have a few really good episodes lined up that I am sure everyone will like. Guy Windsor writes books about historical European swordsmanship and related topics like push-ups. My day jo…
 
This week we step back from royal politics to look at some of the main saints to emerge from Northumbria in the 7th C. We also look at how the distinctive culture that these people fostered set the scene of the flourishing of intellectual activity that would become known as the Northumbrian Golden Age. Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening https:/…
 
all of the Anglo-Saxon poetry that has survived is found in just four manuscripts which escaped the ravages of time, the pillaging of the Vikings, and the censorship of the Church. One thing that the Anglo-Saxon people were particularly fond of was telling (and trying to guess the answer of) riddles. It wasn't just children, who enjoyed riddles. Ad…
 
Following the death of Oswald, Northumbria was reduced to a fragmented vassal of Mercia. But that was changed under the leadership of Oswald's brother, Oswiu. Oswiu reunited Northumbria and led it to a new period of power and hegemony... that all came crashing down very quickly and left the king reeling. Under him and his son, Ecgfrith, Northumbria…
 
In this episode, we look at Heathenism both old and modern. We look at how Heathenism has been reconstructed as well as heathenism of over a thousand years ago. Heathenry, also termed Heathenism, contemporary Germanic Paganism, or Germanic Neopaganism is a modern pagan religion. Developed in Europe during the early 20th century, its practitioners m…
 
Hello everyone. This is a very short episode but I had to give out what is happening at the moment. The Wanderer is now not just a podcast but is also a Website and a youtube channel. Website: https://www.thewanderer.info/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGOpG4Raynnu3bcRUXPbd3w The website: is a campaign website fighting for the recogniti…
 
After the death of Edwin, Northumbria was thrown into chaos by the ravages of Cadwallon who swiftly deposed the kings who rose to replace him. But, in 633, a young Northumbrian noble returned from exile in western Scotland and defeated the rampaging Welsh king. He soon established himself as a new overlord of the Northumbrians and exerted great pol…
 
Anglo-Saxon Poetry encompasses verse written during the 600-year Anglo-Saxon period of British history, from the mid-fifth century to the Norman Conquest of 1066. Almost all of the literature of this period was orally transmitted, and almost all poems were intended for oral performance. As a result of this, Anglo-Saxon poetry tends to be highly rhy…
 
This week we begin a miniseries on the Kingdom of Northumbria from the early 7th to the mid 9th C. We start with a look at one of the most famous Northumbrian kings: Edwin. The first Christian king and a ruler who established Northumbria's place as one of the most powerful kingdoms in Anglo-Saxon England. Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening http…
 
From paganism to Christianity, we explore the religions of Anglo-Saxon England. The Germanic migrants who settled in Britain in the fifth century were pagans. From the end of the sixth century, missionaries from Rome and Ireland converted the rulers of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms to a religion – Christianity – which had originated in the Middle East. …
 
The Anglo-Saxons believed in many different creatures and monsters. They populated their world and haunted their nightmares. Grendel is one of three foes, along with Grendel's mother and a dragon, in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf. Grendel is thought of as a huge troll-like creature who dwells in a swamp or a cave. Those are the sorts of locatio…
 
After last week's absence, we return with a new chronological episode as we continue our journey. This week we turn to the beginning of the conversion of England. We meet a lot new figures and finally come to the first definite date in Anglo-Saxon history: 597. It's the start of a fundamental change which will totally reshape Anglo-Saxon England an…
 
In this episode we take a big picture look at the working and development of Anglo-Saxon kingship. This is the first of two episodes meant to help you better follow what is coming in the podcast by introducing you to the history, ideas, and sources of Anglo-Saxon kingship. Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund Wōdening https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQfdq…
 
This week we take a dive into the mysterious and often complicated world of Anglo-Saxon paganism. We discuss what we mean by 'paganism' today and look at the ways people have attempted to reconstruct the beliefs of the pre-Christian Anglo-Saxons. The results may be unexpected, but they are guaranteed to be interesting. Music: 'Wælheall' by Hrōðmund…
 
Loading …

מדריך עזר מהיר

זכויות יוצרים 2022 | מפת אתר | מדיניות פרטיות | תנאי השירות
Google login Twitter login Classic login