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Exploring the coolest and most incredible stuff in science, from way back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth to a future where humans live in space! Fun Kids Science Weekly is hosted by Dan and is the perfect science podcast for kids and families everywhere. Each week, you'll find episodes from series like Deep Space High, Age of the Dinosaurs and Professor Hallux. There's also a special guest, top experts answering all your science questions and Dangerous Dan - something scientific that’s also ...
 
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The coronavirus variant has spread across the UK at incredible speed – but there are signs that the wave may have reached its peak. Madeleine Finlay talks to the Guardian science correspondent Nicola Davis about what we can expect in the weeks and months to come, and whether a second ‘exit wave’ could be here in the summer. Help support our indepen…
 
NEWS: 'Ocean battery' targets renewable energy dilemma | TechXplore (00:57) A wind turbine sitting idle on a calm day or spinning swiftly when power demand is already met poses a problem for renewables, and is one researchers think can be tackled under the sea. The company, Dutch startup Ocean Grazer, has come up with the concept of a “ocean batter…
 
This week, we talk to Karla Rivera-Figueroa and Inge-Marie Eigsti, who together with Nana Yaa A. Marfo published a systematic review asking about parental perceptions of autism in both LatinX and Black Sociocultural contexts. Six themes popped out, and the question for Karla and Dr Eigsti were “how can research help”? What funding opportunities, cu…
 
SpaceSpeak's Peter Beery joins us in this week's Science Weekly podcast to chat all about how he is sending our Mission Transmission message into space and we hear how you can go to space with Mission Transmission! We catch up with Sidney McSprocket who is teaching us about Great British Scientists - this week its about the inventor of the toilet! …
 
Last week, the tech CEO Elizabeth Holmes – once described as ‘the next Steve Jobs’ – was convicted of fraud, and could face decades in prison. Her now collapsed company, Theranos, promised to revolutionise medicine with a machine that could run hundreds of health tests on just a pinprick of blood. Those claims have since been exposed as false – but…
 
It’s been called the most important glacier in the world. The Thwaites glacier in Antarctica is the size of Florida, and contains enough water to raise sea levels by over half a metre. Over the past 30 years it has been melting at an increasing pace, and currently contributes 4% of annual global sea level rise. Ian Sample speaks to marine geophysic…
 
MIT Engineers Test An Idea For A New Hovering Rover | Brighter Side News (01:28) Due to the lack of atmosphere, the moon and other airless bodies such as asteroids can build up an electric field. Because of direct exposure to the sun and surrounding plasma. Moon’s electric charge is strong enough to levitate dust more than 1 meter above the ground.…
 
Most people with autism have some sort of sensory dysfunction: hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity or sensory avoiding behaviors to touch, smell, sound, light. But a new study looking at kids from the Study to Explore Early Development (SEED) suggest that it may be more important than you think. In fact, it was the only feature to unify those with …
 
NASA's Astronaut Candidate Jack Hathaway joins us in this week's Science Weekly podcast to chat all about his journey to become an astronaut and we also hear how you can go to space with Mission Transmission! We catch up with Sidney McSprocket who is teaching us about Great British Scientists - this week its about William Jenkins and Lucy Hughes. W…
 
On Wednesday, 194,747 daily confirmed Covid cases were reported for the whole of the UK. But this doesn’t include all the people who have caught the virus for the second, or even third time. In fact, official figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland don’t include those who have had Covid before, despite warnings from scientists that up to…
 
New year resolutions often include eating more healthily, doing exercise and trying to shift some of the extra weight put on over Christmas. Yet research suggests the vast majority of people who do lose weight ultimately end up putting nearly all of it back on. So why is it so difficult? Madeleine Finlay speaks to health journalist and ex-neuroscie…
 
Astronauts, Doctors and Prime Ministers join us in this special best 2021 episode of the Fun Kids Science Weekly! Boris Johnson answers your climate questions, Tim Peake chats about his life in space and Adam Kay joins us to give us some really gross body facts! We catch up with Sidney McSprocket who is teaching us about Great British Scientists an…
 
From electrons behaving as both particles and waves to a cat in a box that’s both dead and alive, the consequences of quantum physics are decidedly weird. So strange, that over a century since its conception, scientists are still arguing about the best way to understand the theory. In the second of two episodes, Ian Sample sits down with the physic…
 
It has been more than a century since the groundwork of quantum physics was first formulated and yet the consequences of the theory still elude both scientists and philosophers. Why does light sometimes behave as a wave, and other times as a particle? Why does the outcome of an experiment apparently depend on whether the particles are being observe…
 
Launch Day From Nasa.gov: NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope launched at 7:20 a.m. EST Saturday (Dec. 25th) on an Ariane 5 rocket from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana, South America. A joint effort with ESA (European Space Agency) and the Canadian Space Agency, The Webb observatory is NASA’s revolutionary flagship mission to seek the light from …
 
Yesterday, daily cases in the UK exceeded 100,000 for the first time since the pandemic began. Despite this, the government has stuck to its guns in refusing to introduce any restrictions in England before Christmas Day. Yesterday also saw the publishing of a report from a team at Imperial College London that suggests, in the UK, the risk of a hosp…
 
Cop26 may have dominated the headlines this year, but there have been lots of other fascinating, devastating and hopeful environment stories over the past 12 months. Madeleine Finlay speaks to Guardian environment editor Damian Carrington and biodiversity reporter Phoebe Weston about some of their favourites, from reintroducing wild bison to the fi…
 
News Self-Driving Microscopes to Navigate the Nanoscale | IEEE Spectrum (02:11) 3D IMAGING ENHANCES CHECKS FOR AGGRESSIVE PROSTATE CANCER | Futurity (07:34) Scientists Discover 'Significant' Water Hidden In Martian Grand Canyon | Vice (14:45) AI Predicts Which Individuals Will Develop Dementia Within Two Years | GenEngNews (20:40) FDA Approves New …
 
It’s up! The 2021 Year End Summary of Autism Science. It covers everything from glial cells to girls and females, from those that are traditionally underserved to the genetic underpinnings of ASD and siblings and everything in between. It’s a 30 minute recap of the highlights of research from the past 365 days. You can read the full summary here: T…
 
Catherine from the National Space Centre joins Dan for this week's Science Weekly podcast to chat all about earths planetary defence system and how it works to deflect asteroids. We catch up with Sidney McSprocket who is teaching us about Great British Scientists - this week its Eugene Rimmell and James Dyson. Whilst the deadly (and festive!) Vampi…
 
For three consecutive rainy seasons, the eastern Horn of Africa has experienced poor rainfall. Confounded by Covid-19 and desert locust invasions, millions are now facing starvation across parts of Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia. Already, livestock and wildlife are dying of thirst and hunger in large numbers. And at the heart of it all is the worsenin…
 
As England moves to plan B, Boris Johnson has announced that all adults will be offered a booster vaccine by the end of December. But will that be enough to protect the NHS from being overwhelmed? Madeleine Finlay speaks to the Guardian’s science editor, Ian Sample, about the spread of Omicron, and what we can do to prevent a tidal wave of cases. H…
 
News Timestamps: WhatsApp Launches Instant Cryptocurrency Payments in the US | MacRumors (01:42) Two-year follow up shows delaying umbilical cord clamping saves babies' lives | MedicalXpress (10:11) Body-sucking sleeping bag may help protect astronauts' vision | New Atlas (19:19) Blue Origin's Third Space Tourism Flight Takes Off | Interesting Engi…
 
On Tuesday, the journal Lancet published a 2+ year long endeavor around understanding the heterogeneity of autism not just in features but in access to services for individuals and families across the world. They called for a stepped care to help individualize and prioritize needs in different individuals based on their needs, not their diagnosis. …
 
Vaccine creator and Scientist Katie Ewer joins Dan for this week's Science Weekly podcast talking the science behind vaccines and why snot and scabs are so important! We catch up with Sidney McSprocket who is teaching us about Great British Scientists - this week its Sir Charles Wheatstone and Sir Jonathon Hive. Whilst the deadly velvet ant is the …
 
On 22 December, if all goes to plan, the £7.5bn James Webb space telescope (JWST) will be blasted into space on top of a giant European Ariane 5 rocket. As it travels to its final destination – a point about a million miles away – it will begin to unfold its gold, honeycombed mirror; a vast light-catching bucket that could give us a view of the uni…
 
Over 40 countries have now confirmed the presence of Omicron. And, in the UK, scientists have been increasingly expressing their concern about the new variant. Some have speculated there could be more than 1,000 cases here already, and that it could become the dominant variant within weeks. To get an update on what we know about the Omicron variant…
 
News Timestamps South Korea plans to host world's first floating city by 2025 | Global Construction Review (01:50) Safely delivering radiation to cancer patients in a 'FLASH' | Phys.org (09:26) Bionic Eye Study Paves the Way Toward Human Trials | Neuroscience News (13:21) Synthetic tissue can repair hearts, muscles, and vocal cords | McGill Newsroo…
 
Andrew Gordus joins Dan for this week's Science Weekly podcast talking about the amazing science behind spiders webs and why they weave them. We catch up with Sidney McSprocket who is teaching us about Great British Scientists - this week its Harrison and Oluwaseyi Sosanya. Whilst the hottest ocean are the subject of Dangerous Dan. In Kareena's Che…
 
Clinicians around the world have noticed an increase in young adults, often women, developing ‘tic-like behaviours’ – sudden movements or vocalisations similar to what’s seen in Tourette Syndrome. Except these tics come on much later in life, and escalate more rapidly. Some have blamed the recent rise on social media – but the reality is much more …
 
Last week, a new variant of Covid-19 was detected by scientists in South Africa. Since then, additional cases have been reported beyond southern Africa, including Belgium, Canada, Israel, Australia and the UK. And with the WHO warning that the Omicron variant poses a very high global risk, scientists around the world are scrambling to uncover clues…
 
News Timestamps: Scientists use seismic noise to image first hundred meters of Mars | Ars Technica (01:44) Ultrashort laser pulses shred superbugs without harming human cells | New Atlas (08:47) The World's First 3D-Printed Prosthetic Eye Will Be Received by a British Patient | Interesting Engineering (16:48) White Matter Brain Lesions on MRI Linke…
 
Anne Wignall joins Dan for this week's Science Weekly podcast talking about the history and importants of the assassin bug and how it uses taps to calm its prey. We catch up with Sidney McSprockett who's teaching us about great british scientists, this week its Babbage, Lovelace and Berners Lee. In Karina's Chemistry we find out about how we can he…
 
Last week the UK government confirmed it would be extending its animal welfare (sentience) bill to include decapods (such as crabs, lobsters and crayfish), and cephalopods (such as octopuses, squid and cuttlefish). The move followed a government-commissioned review of the scientific evidence, which found strong evidence that cephalopods and decapod…
 
Chris Hadfield was the first Canadian to walk in space, became commander of the International Space Station, and became a viral sensation after covering Bowie like no one else. He speaks to the Guardian’s science editor, Ian Sample, about life as an astronaut, the new race to the moon and his new novel, The Apollo Murders.. Help support our indepen…
 
News Timestamps: Meta’s sci-fi haptic glove prototype lets you feel VR objects using air pockets | The Verge (01:35) A New Membrane Can Substantially Upgrade Wearable Energy Generators | Interesting Engineering (10:23) Research reveals how to design a better next-generation lithium-ion battery | TechXplore (15:23) Psychedelics show promise in treat…
 
You have heard a lot about how the pandemic affected those with a diagnosis – and it isn’t good. Recent studies have turned their attention to stress and anxiety and depression of caregivers during the pandemic. It was higher in those parents with children of a neurodevelopmental disorder, but it was also complicated, related to the functioning of …
 
Science in the news this week is the biggest news from the last month from one of the most important people - we speak to UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson about COP26. Also this week we answer more of your questions, Sir Sidney McSprocket joins us to tell us about a Great British Mind, we find out about ducklings and K-Mistry is exploring about chem…
 
Over the past few weeks, a thick brown smog has enveloped Delhi. The pollution is so bad that the capital and surrounding states have shut schools and imposed work-from-home orders. Toxic air at levels 20 times higher than those deemed healthy by the World Health Organization has become a seasonal occurrence in India, causing about 1.6 million prem…
 
Growing numbers of people catching coronavirus are experiencing an unpleasant distortion of smells. Scientists are still unsure what causes this often distressing condition, known as parosmia, where previously enjoyable aromas trigger feelings of disgust. Madeleine Finlay talks to science correspondent Linda Geddes about her own parosmia, and chemi…
 
News Timestamps: A New Origami Lunar Habitat Can Unfold Into 750 Times Its Own Size | Interesting Engineering (00:52) SpinLaunch completes first test flight of alternative rocket | CNBC (06:44) Chemotherapy-free stem cell transplant promises safer leukemia treatment | New Atlas (15:25) A New Cable Prototype Fully Charges an EV in 5 Minutes – Robb R…
 
On this week’s podcast, we interview Dr. Giacomo Vivanti from the AJ Drexel Autism Institute who, together with Daniel Messinger from University of Miami, wrote an analysis of how research and intervention have changed since the DSMIII was written 40 years ago. They include theories of the causes of autism, the theories of the deficits and strength…
 
This week we have so many friends joining us from Maddie Moate to Professor Hallux and even Techno Mum! Plus we've got questions about clouds and ears, cows are in the news because Morrisons are feeding them seaweed to help fight climate change and COP-26 is finishing up. Maddie Moate's new book is called Stuff: Eco-Stories of Everyday Stuff, liste…
 
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian’s award-winning environment team. Today, Science Weekly host Madeleine Finlay talks to the Guardian’s environment correspondent, Fiona Harvey, and environment editor, Damian Carrington, on how the …
 
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian’s award-winning environment team. Today, host Madeleine Finlay speaks to environment reporter Oliver Milman about electric cars, ‘environmentally-friendly’ planes and the need to rethink transport.…
 
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian’s award-winning environment team. Today, Guardian global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, talks to Katharine Hayhoe and Peter Stott about their work as climate scientists and how they feel Cop26…
 
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian’s award-winning environment team. Today, Science Weekly host Madeleine Finlay and Guardian reporter Nina Lakhani attend the People’s Summit, which brings together movements from across the world to…
 
News Timestamps: Thiel-Backed Helion Targets 2024 Breakthrough for Nuclear Fusion | Bloomberg (01:08) Humans could 'live forever' as firm offers 'immortality' freezing for about $660-a-year | The Brighter Side (08:52) Magnetic brain stimulation nearly cures depression | Free Think (15:08) 5D data storage technology offers 10,000 times the density o…
 
The Science Weekly podcast is in Glasgow, where we are bringing listeners daily episodes from Cop26. Each morning you will hear from one of the Guardian’s award-winning environment team. Today, the Guardian’s biodiversity reporter, Phoebe Weston, talks to one of the world’s leading marine ecologists, Dr Enric Sala, about the role our oceans can pla…
 
Two weeks ago the topic was gene x environment interactions. But some genetic variants, including rare genetic variants, can exert huge influence on a diagnosis by themselves. New data from genetic samples that have been sequenced are showing an increase in the number of these genes and the role of these genes, and how they work with common variant…
 
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