In Defense Of Plants ציבורי
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Lichens have so much to teach us about our planet and yet we have so much to learn about them! That is where people like Dr. Jessi Allen come in. She has devoted her life to understanding lichens and their diversity in addition to sharing her passion for these symbiotic organisms with the world. Join us as we discuss the importance of lichens, some…
 
How long can a tree live? How old are the oldest trees? The answers to questions like these are more nuanced that some might think. We sit down with curator of the Gymnosperm Database, Dr. Chris Earle, for some insights on tree longevity. This episode was produced in part by Lor, Monika, Brandon, Jeremy, Suzanne, Kristina, Christine, Silas, Michael…
 
In this episode, we journey back in time with the help of DNA and fossil evidence to learn what they can teach us about plant evolution. Specifically, we explore how genome duplication events has influenced the evolutionary history of gymnosperms. Joining us to talk about this is Dr. Greg Stull who has built his research career around being able to…
 
How do parasitic plants find an appropriate host and what determines their range of host possibilities? These are the kinds of questions that drive Dr. Caitlin Conn's research. Join us as we explore some of the insight she has gained into parasitic plant ecology. This episode was produced in part by Monika, Brandon, Jeremy, Suzanne, Kristina, Chris…
 
Magnolias are among the most iconic trees in the world. This family (Magnoliaceae) has also been around for a very long time. But, for all their history, intrigue, and interest, the magnolia family is not faring well in our modern world. Recent estimates indicate that nearly half of all magnolia species are threatened with extinction and that is wh…
 
To look upon a flowering azalea is to bare witness to one of our planets most stunning botanical spectacles. These ericaceous shrubs enjoy celebrity status among many a gardener because of this. Azaleas are also ecologically important plants in their native habitats. Joining us to celebrate these Rhododendrons is Curator of Special Collections at t…
 
Plants come in a bewildering variety of colors. Even within species, colors can vary from individual to individual. How and why color can differs are exactly the kinds of questions that intrigue PhD student Cierra Sullivan. Join us as we explore ideas relating to topics such as leaf variegation and the influence of climate change on flower color. T…
 
In this episode, we celebrate one of the most venerable conifers in North America - the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). This wide ranging species can establish early after disturbance and live for centuries, bolstering the ecology of the forests it comprises. Joining us for this celebration is arborist Casey Clapp, co-host of the wonderful Com…
 
Their ancestors once dominated the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period, growing into massive trees that could reach upwards of 160 feet (50 m) into the canopy. Today, the quillworts (Isoetes spp.) are all that remains of this lineage. Though cosmopolitan in their distribution, quillworts can be hard to find unless you know where to look. Luckil…
 
Have you ever walked through a plant nursery or garden center and wondered about who keeps track of all those named varieties, selections, and cultivars? The answer to this are horticultural taxonomists! From registering new plants to maintaining herbarium records and DNA barcoding, horticultural taxonomists really have their job cut out for them. …
 
It's important to give credit to the small but important things in life, like algae! In this episode we dive under the microscope lens with Julia Van Etten to talk about the microscopic world of algae and how they relate to plants. Julia is a PhD student researching extremophile algae and also runs a wonderful and fascinating science communication …
 
In this episode, we explore how a small native seed company selling native plant seeds out of their living room grew into one of the biggest native plant nurseries in the United States. Joining us is Horticulture Educator Kaitlyn O'Connor to give us a deep dive into how Prairie Moon Nursery is able to provide over 700 species of native plants for u…
 
The United Nations kicked off 2021 is a rallying cry for restoring ecosystems around the globe. The so-called UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration is aimed at preventing, halting, and reversing ecosystem degradation around the globe. Importantly, ecosystem restoration should not be seen a prescription, but rather a process that changes as we learn mo…
 
This episode explores the amazing world of Trillium diversity. This charismatic genus is incredible in its own right, but what makes it so diverse only adds to the intrigue. Joining us is Dr. Chelsea Miller to talk about her research on the role of ants in explaining the diversity of trillium in North American forests. You will learn just how impor…
 
Everyone needs a bit of calcium in their diet, but too much of it can cause serious health issues. The same is true for plants. Growing in soils high in calcium is no walk in the park and yet, around the world, we see many plants that have adapted to soils made toxic by calcium sulfate. How they manage to adapt to such conditions is the main resear…
 
Palms (Arecaceae) are among the best known and easily recognizable groups of plants on Earth. Their diversity is staggering and they play important roles in the ecology of the habitats in which they grow. But how much do we know about their evolutionary history? What can a deep time perspective teach us about palm evolution. Joining us to talk abou…
 
Cacti may appear like strong, independent organisms but that simply isn't the case. No organism operates in a vacuum and cacti are no exception to this. This episode, we talk with Stefan Burger, or as you may know him, Cactus Explorer, about the amazing world of cacti and some of the organisms they interact with that allow them to live in some of t…
 
Plant sex is strange. Rooted in place, plants have had to get really creative (evolutionarily speaking) when it comes to reproduction. Moreover, there is no single pathway to success, and each plant lineage seems to have evolved multiple strategies for swapping gametes. Joining us to talk about the sex lives of one genus of plants is PhD student Me…
 
Disturbance is an integral part of any ecosystem, but as the human presence on this planet continues to grow, disturbances are becoming more frequent and more severe. In this episode, Dr. Brian Buma joins us to discuss his research on disturbance ecology. His work has taken him all over the globe with the aim of understanding how disturbances lead …
 
Resolving the origins of flowering plants requires an understanding of how their morphology came to be. After all, despite their rapid appearance in the fossil record, flowering plants did not evolve over night. There had to be transitional phases between what we recognize as a gymnosperm and what we recognize as an angiosperm and that is what this…
 
Seeds are among the most important biological structures on this planet. Seeds have been instrumental in the diversification of plants, allowing them to spread into new habitats all over the globe. In fact, you and I would not be here if it were not for seeds. For these reasons and more, Dr. Cecilia Zumajo is fascinated by how seeds evolved. By loo…
 
More than half of the species on the Endangered Species List are plants and yet plants receive less than 5% of all conservation funding. If we care about slowing or reversing biodiversity loss, we need to start prioritizing plant conservation efforts. Joining us to talk about this is plant conservationist Sara Johnson. Sara's work focuses heavily o…
 
Are the leaf margins smooth or toothed? How dense are the leaf veins? Are the petioles thick or thin? The answers to these questions go far beyond helping us identify plant species. Dr. Ian Miller of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science joins us to talk about how such details in leaf fossils can be used to understand everything from the climate …
 
The asteroid that slammed into the Yucatan Peninsula some 66 million years ago marked the end of the Cretaceous and the reign of the dinosaurs. As famous as this extinction event is, we know considerably less about how such disturbances affected ecosystems like tropical rainforests. That is where people like Dr. Mónica Carvalho come in. Together wi…
 
In today's human-dominated world, healthy forests require healthy and sustainable management practices. To do this, we must try to understand the myriad processes that affect forest health and that is where our guest comes in. Dr. Matt Russell is an Associate Professor and Extension Specialist for the University of Minnesota and his research focuse…
 
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זכויות יוצרים 2021 | מפת אתר | מדיניות פרטיות | תנאי השירות
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