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ANAM is dedicated to the training of the most exceptional young classical musicians from Australia and New Zealand. It is a place in which young musicians fulfil their potential as music leaders, distinguished by their skill, imagination and courage, and by their determined contribution to a vibrant music culture. ANAM Musicians share the stage with the world’s finest artists, performing in over 180 concerts and events in venues across Australia. Alumni work in orchestras and chamber ensembl ...
 
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Episode 5, 2021: Hindemith’s Kammermusik no. 1Wednesday 22 September 2021Born in Hanau, Germany in 1895, Paul Hindemith was cultivated as violist, violinist, pianist and percussionist. He was also “one of the most practical, but also the most overlooked composers of the last century.” Considered an avant-garde composer in the 20s, Hindemith’s Kamme…
 
Episode 4, 2021: ANAM Radio Special Part IIMonday 21 June 2021“ANAM is really interested in the person, as well as the musician.”-Thea Rossen (percussion, 2016)In the second part of the ANAM Radio Special, alumna Thea Rossen, and current musicians Rachel Lau, Nathan Gatenby and Noah Rudd share fun anecdotes about their ANAM auditions and share hot …
 
Episode 3, 2021: ANAM Radio SpecialMonday 7 June 2021In this special episode of ANAM Radio, alumna Thea Rossen takes over the mic to chat with ANAM musicians and faculty about why ANAM is a unique and special place for young musicians. They also give us insights about what a usual week at ANAM looks like whilst musicians, faculty and guest artists …
 
Episode 2, 2021: The Poet, Nature and the Dance (ANAM 2021 Opening Concert)Wednesday 28 April 2021ANAM Head of Strings, Resident Cello Faculty (Chair of Cello, Supported Anonymously) and long-standing member of the Chambre Orchestra of Europe, Howard Penny talks to ANAM Music Librarian Phil Lambert about ANAM 2021 Opening Concert, The Poet, Nature …
 
Episode 1, 2021: Strauss’s Der RosenkavalierThursday 25 March 2021In 1911 Richard Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier (The Cavalier of the Rose) premiered in Dresden, Germany when the aftermath of World War I caused the cultures of Vienna to fade. A bittersweet romantic comedy set in the 1740s in old Vienna, a half-real and half-imagined Utopia, one that S…
 
Episode 17, 2020: Britten’s Young Person’s Guide to OrchestraFriday 11 December 2020For his final year as ANAM’s Artistic Director, Nick Deutsch originally planned to start and end the year performing with the complete ANAM cohort and faculty. However, 2020 had other plans. Yet as he proved, “no pandemic will stand in our way”. In this special epis…
 
Episode 16, 2020: Antheil’s Ballet MécaniqueWednesday 18 November 2020For ANAM Radio’s final 2020 episode, Phil Lambert (ANAM Music Librarian) and Peter Neville (ANAM Head of Percussion) talk about one of the 20th Century’s unique, bizarre and outrageous compositions, George Antheil’s Ballet Mécanique. Born in New Jersey, Antheil found himself in P…
 
Episode 15, 2020: Dvořák’s Quintet in A majorWednesday 4 November 2020ANAM alumnus Laurence Matheson (piano 2016) and ANAM Music Librarian Phil Lambert agree that Dvořák was quite happy when he wrote his Quintet in A major in his country estate in Vysoká, Czech Republic in the summer of 1887. Yet, this light and folk-influenced composition finishes…
 
Episode 14, 2020: Bottesini’s Double Bass ConcertoWednesday 21 October 2020Giovanni Bottesini is considered to be one of the most colourful and mysterious celebrities of 19thcentury music. Although his Double Bass Concerto no. 2 is considered to be a staple in every double bassist’s repertoire, there is unfortunately no surviving orchestral score w…
 
Episode 13, 2020: Finnissy’s Ru Tchou (The Ascent of the Sun)Wednesday 7 October 2020A virtuoso pianist himself, British composer Michael Finnissy has been at the forefront of new music for the last fifty years. He composed Ru Tchou in 1975 for a concert series in Taiwan and intended it to be a musical ritual for welcoming the sunrise. A Canadian c…
 
Episode 12, 2020: de Falla’s Concerto for HarpsichordWednesday 23 September 2020When pianist Wanda Landowska asked composer Manuel de Falla to write a composition inspired by Baroque music, she envisioned the piece to be played on a harpsichord. To this end, Landowska also commissioned the French firm Pleyel to build the instrument for her which th…
 
Episode 11, 2020: Vivaldi’s The Four SeasonsWednesday 9 September 2020 It was in 1725 in the city of Amsterdam when Venetian virtuoso and composer, Antonio Vivaldi’s Il cimento dell’armonia e inventione or The Contest between harmony and invention was published. The composition was made up of twelve sets of concertos for violin, strings and continu…
 
Episode 10, 2020: Chopin’s BarcarolleWednesday 19 August 2020It is surprising to know that Frédéric François Chopin wrote the Barcarolle without having had the chance to visit Venice during his lifetime. A barcarolle is a Venetian gondolier's song, and Chopin wrote his in 1845. ANAM Alumnus Adam McMillan (piano 2017) tells ANAM Music Librarian Phil…
 
Episode 9, 2020: Mozart’s Six German DancesWednesday 12 August 2020This week we revisit Mozart’s first time in Prague in 1787 where he wrote the first of his ten sets of German Dances. But first, Phil Lambert (ANAM Music Librarian) clarifies that the music in the elegant ballroom scenes in film adaptations of Jane Austen’s novels where couples danc…
 
Episode 8, 2020: Strauss’s MetamorphosenWednesday 5 August 2020The position of Richard Strauss during the Second World War was truly tragic. Already an esteemed composer during his time, he was used by the Nazi Party as a validation of its program. His contrasting political view was compromised by his desire to protect his Jewish family members. Th…
 
Episode 7, 2020: Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for stringsWednesday 29 July 2020This week ANAM Music Librarian, Phil Lambert, talks about one of the most popular String Serenades by Pyotr Tchaikovsky. The story begins in 1868 when the master composer was putting together an anthology of Russian folk songs for piano duets. The arrangements are short and ha…
 
Episode 6, 2020: Dvořák’s Serenade for windsWednesday 8 July 2020Antonin Dvořák’s road to success was long and hard. But like many successful composers of his time, his perseverance enabled him to create masterpieces that endured time and space. In December 1877, he travelled to Vienna to meet Johannes Brahms, the first great composer to truly appr…
 
Episode 5, 2020: Ibert’s Flute ConcertoWednesday 1 July 2020ANAM Music Librarian, Phil Lambert thinks French composer Jacques Ibert’s most popular compositions sparkle like French champagne. First coming to public attention in the early 1920s, Ibert’s oeuvre is known for being polished and entertaining, never driven by any theory, agenda or the des…
 
Episode 4, 2020: Strauss’s Sonatina no. 1Wednesday 24 June 2020Writing Sonatina no. 1 during the height of World War II became Richard Strauss’s form of escape from a decade of Nazism that wrought horrors in his hometown in Munich, Germany. The then 80-year-old composer wrote this piece to keep his mind occupied after the premiere of his opera Capr…
 
Episode 3, 2020: Mozart’s Oboe QuartetWednesday 10 June 2020While in the middle of completing the finishing touches for his first major opera, Idomeneo, for the Munich Court in 1781, Mozart found the time to write a chamber work for the Court Orchestra’s principal oboist, Friedrich Ramm. That work is the Quartet in F major for oboe and three string…
 
Episode 2, 2020: Bartók’s Violin Concerto Wednesday 3 June 2020The 1930s sees the Hungarian composer Béla Bartók at the height of his career as he produced succeeding masterpieces exhibiting strict counterpoints and new sounds. That is why the Violin Concerto he wrote for his close associate, violin virtuoso Zoltán Székely was seen as a step backwa…
 
Episode 1, 2020: Prokofiev’s Sinfonia ConcertanteWednesday 27 May 2020After a disastrous premiere in 1938, Sergei Prokofiev put away his Sinfonia Concertante. It wasn’t until 1947 that it resurfaced, when a 20-year-old cello student, Mstislav Rostropovich, discovered it from the archives and performed it at the Moscow Conservatory. After that perfo…
 
The great Hungarian violinist and conductor, Gábor Takács-Nagy describes the First Viennese School as the “golden time in classical music”. It is a thought that many around the world share, as audiences continue to be moved and inspired by the masterpieces that came from late-18th century Vienna. Hear Gábor, along with ANAM’s Artistic Director Nick…
 
Clara Schumann was one of the most successful concert performers of the 19th century, lauded across Europe as the ‘Queen of the piano’. She was also a skilled composer, but her music was forgotten for years in favour of her husband’s significant and celebrated output. However, in recent years, her music has been brought back into the classical musi…
 
Igor Stravinsky is considered one of the most influential composers of the 20th century, in no small part indebted to his three groundbreaking ballets - The Firebird, Petrushka, and The Rite of Spring.These pieces were made possible by Russian artistic visionary Sergei Diaghilev, and his ballet company known as the Ballet Russes. Hear leading arts …
 
The ANAM experience is one like no other. Hear first-year violinist Mia Stanton, Head of Cello Howard Penny, and ANAM alumnus Jonathan Bekes share insights into what it’s like to be a musician at the Australian National Academy of Music (ANAM).Written and produced by Madi Chwasta.Music, all performed by ANAM musicians:Mozart - String Quintet No.4 i…
 
2019 marks 100 years since Czech composer Gideon Klein died in horrifying circumstances during World War II. However, his music - a distinctive mix of folk-infused melodies reminiscent of Leoš Janáček and the modernist sensibilities espoused by Arnold Schoenberg’s 12-tone school - lives on, and is only becoming more prolific with time.Hear ANAM Art…
 
Ten Thousand Birds by John Luther Adams is an immersive piece of music deeply connected to nature and place. Hear triple Grammy-award-winning flautist and ANAM Guest Artist Tim Munro, Grammy award and Pulitzer prize winning composer John Luther Adams, and ANAM cellist David Moran talk about their love of birdsong, breaking down performance conventi…
 
Recorded live at ANAM for the concert "Cage and Zappa" on August 12 2017, this very special episode of the Up-Bow Down-Low sees hosts Luke and Kenny joined by Melbourne mezzo and choral director Jeannie Marsh, ANAM Head of Percussion Peter Neville, and Tasmanian piano virtuoso Michael Kieran Harvey for a panel discussion on John Cage and Frank Zapp…
 
What does it mean to be female in classical music? Hosts Kenny and Luke dive headfirst into the many-layered topic of equality in classical music, accompanied by ANAM viola alumnus and all-round great lady Katie Yap. They talk composers, the dark of history of women in classical music, discrimination and oppression, and what might come next, with h…
 
Hosts Kenny and Luke reflect on finishing up at ANAM with the help of high-flying alumni Phoebe Russell, Cameron Jamieson, Ashley Smith, Dean Newcomb, and Kaylie Melville. They convince first-year violinist Laura Barton to reluctantly play the theremin, and find out that Gore, New Zealand, is indeed a real place.…
 
Supernova conductor Simone Young is back in the building this week, generously sharing her seemingly boundless knowledge with the ANAM orchestra through a week of workshops on works by Faure, Berg, and other masters of the theme and variations. We talk about the musicology of the orchestra, what it means to lead an orchestra, and what to do when th…
 
ANAM flute alumna Tamara Kohler and internationally renowned conductor Douglas Boyd (former oboist and founding member of the Chamber Orchestra of Europe) join us this week to talk about their chosen paths down the road less travelled. We talk about the linear direction that a career in music can usually take, and about the courage and risk inheren…
 
This week we talk about the Eureka moment, the great 'a-ha!’ which can give you direction and purpose. We're joined by Maestro Simone Young who tells us her story and shares her 'a-ha’s' with us. ANAM percussionist James Townsend drops in to talk about his feelings and to play the snare drum, and we talk about the upcoming gigs at ANAM, but not ver…
 
The meaty topic of auditions is on the menu this week, and somehow Rhapsody in Blue pops us twice in 32 minutes. ANAM Artistic Director Nick Deutsch joins us to share his experiences and stories of tears and triumph and how they do it in Europe, and we’re joined by ANAM horn player Alex Morton who makes what’s probably a copyright infringement duri…
 
We jump into the way-too-big topic of tradition this week, and if it can cause more problems than it solves. We talk about audiences and the classical music industry, the tropes of the orchestra and the stuff we Australians left behind in Europe. We’re joined by the Scottish musicological giant Roy Howat whose virtuosic pianism is matched only by h…
 
Episode 2: Two Erring HumansThis episode is all about perfection, and what that word means in the modern day world of classical music. Our well-meaning discussion on trying to achieve the impossible gets a bit sidetracked by robot trumpet players before being joined by Finnish virtuoso pianist Paavali Jumppanen who charmingly gives us his take on w…
 
Episode 1: New MusicIn this first episode of the Up-Bow Down-Low, brought to you by musicians from the Australian National Academy of Music (ANAM), we talk about ‘new music’, the nebulously-defined body of recently composed Western classical music, and the challenges in getting audiences to listen to and understand what they’re hearing. We talk abo…
 
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זכויות יוצרים 2021 | מפת אתר | מדיניות פרטיות | תנאי השירות
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