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"The Hidden Now Heard podcast is a collection of oral histories that investigate life at long stay hospitals for people with a learning disability across Wales. It's an opportunity to uncover a hidden part of Wales' history, we will speak to nurses, doctors, hospital administrators and most importantly patients who may have spent most of their lives in hospital. Hidden Now Heard is a Mencap Cymru project, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund with support from the Welsh Government. The Hidden ...
 
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Sarah Goldsmith talks about the Grand Tour as a rite of passage for young men. These young men went abroad to learn things about art and architecture. She also discusses the way the Grand Tour intersected with military rites of passage and how some grand tourists ended up at the Battle of Waterloo. To follow Sarah Goldsmith: @S_Goldsmith_This was p…
 
Joanne Paul talks to Helen about Anne Dowriche. Dowriche was a 16th century writer, usually classified as a pious writer. Joanne casts her instead as a deeply political writer, and explains how her commentaries on the wars of religion were a rare example of political writing from a Tudor woman. To find out more about Joanne's work, follow her on Tw…
 
Rachel Hewitt talks to Helen about women in sports and mountaineering, and how that plays into perceptions of women generally, as well as informing current gendered perceptions of who gets to use public spaces. Women are subject to a myriad network of social pressures, many of which are informed by previous perceptions of history. Sports play a lar…
 
Emily Cock talks to Helen about Thomas Fairfax, the Civil War general who used a wheelchair, as well as the history of disability more generally. What did it mean to have facial scars in the 17th century, and how did the Earl of Arlington use a scar on his nose to curry favour with Charles II?Thomas Fairfax's wheelchair: https://www.culture24.org.u…
 
Louisa Egbunike discusses the history of the Nigeria-Biafra war, and particularly how Nigerians responded to the war through the visual and written arts. To follow more of Louisa's work, follow her on twitter at @LouisaEgbunike. Unfortunately, there were a few connection issues in the recording of this podcast, and the sound may be a little patchy …
 
Sophie Oliver talks to Helen about Jean Rhys, the author of Wide Sargasso Sea, intended as a prequel to Jane Eyre. Sophie talks about how she practices history, and the role of objects in literary history.To follow Sophie's work: @sophieolive @LivUniEnglish @LivUniThis was produced in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Follo…
 
Jon Healey discusses the 17th century in all its twists and folds and manifest complexity. He talks about the Royalists, the Parliamentarians, the Levellers, the Diggers, and the Quakers and what each group stood for and fought for, as well as the Glorious Revolution and tales of drunken cavaliers delivering sermons and placing their genitalia into…
 
Nandini Das talks to Helen about the early age of travel in the Elizabethan era. This era saw the beginnings of travel, with the likes of Thomas Coryate creating 'travel wagers' - where he dared others to bet against him circumnavigating Europe. Nandini also reflects on immigration in the Elizabethan era, and she chronicles some of the similarities…
 
David Petts talks about Lindisfarne, the Holy Island. He talks about how St Cuthbert ended up as patron saint of the island, and how the practice of early Christians there. Since Lindisfarne is a tidal island, the coming and going of the tides was often compared with the parting of the Red Sea, and the sea itself was seen as a channel to God. To fo…
 
Emma Butcher talks to Helen about her work on children in warfare. They talk about why children enlisted, and what they did on the battlefield. They discuss the likes of Joseph Bara and Marjorie Fleming, as well as the many magical worlds created by the Bronte sisters. To find more of Emma's work, follow @EmmaButcher_ or see her website: https://ww…
 
In this episode of Hidden Histories I have released an interview with Terry Watson that I conducted on 25 July 2013 as part of my research for the book Tartan Gangs and Paramilitaries. Sadly Terry died in December 2020 after a long illness. His family kindly gave me permission to use this interview for a podcast episode.In the interview Terry talks…
 
Were the Dark Ages really that dark? Seb Falk argues that science and religion weren't at odds with each other in the medieval era, but two sides of the same coin. His main story focuses on the life of John Westwyk, a medieval monk, and through John's eyes we understand how the medieval man or woman might have viewed the world.He talks about the me…
 
Victoria Donovan chats to Helen about how present-day Russia and the USSR have grappled with the legacy of Russia's buildings. The atheist USSR frequently deployed images of ruined Orthodox churches in the aftermath of the Second World War - it was great propaganda. But this posed problems - the USSR was an atheist state, and did not want to be see…
 
Sam Goodman talks to Helen about the end of the British empire and how Britains choose to remember and interact with their former colonies, particularly India. Sam also talks about where alcohol fit into the British Empire - from guides that advised the drinking stout to fortify oneself, to the formation of cultures of drinking in India and at home…
 
Michael Talbot starts with a broad overview of the Ottoman Empire's interests and what power it held, before moving on to a problem that would haunt the Ottomans consistently - pirates. These weren't necessarily pirates in a Disney sense - war between the British and the French consistently spilled over into the Meditterenean, and often Ottoman goo…
 
Christienna Fryer talks to Helen about the emancipation of slaves in Jamaica in 1838. While the colonial government thought that a similar plantation system might exist with the addition of wages, their formerly enslaved subjects disagreed. Christienna talks about how Jamaicans resisted British rule, and particularly about the Morant Bay rebellion …
 
Charles Masson set out one day to hunt down the lost cities of Alexander the Great. He was an private in the East India Company's army until he deserted, and was as such trying to both locate and excavate a mysterious lost city, whilst also being on the run. His story is full of hardship, and Edmund Richardson discusses why a man would choose to ab…
 
Brendan McGeever talks to Helen about the relationship between anti-semitism and the Russian Revolution. The Russian Revolution in 1917 was a complex event, with myriad factions vying for power. In the chaos, a wave of anti-semitic attacks occurred, and many of the those vying for control did little to stop this. The Bolsheviks, lead by Vladimir Le…
 
Catherine Fletcher talks about the Italian Renaissance, giving a run-down of her new book, The Beauty and the Terror. She talks about Florence, and the beginnings of the renaissance, discussing Lorenzo de' Medici as well as the Borgias, as well as the influence of Girolamo Savanorola.She also talks about the more brutal aspects of the renaissance, …
 
Tom Scott-Smith and Helen talk about the history of famine relief and humanitarian aid, and how it has changed over time. Humitarian aid is intensely political, and the form that humanitarian aid takes today is heavily influenced by its past. That form is important, because the type of aid that refugees receive has a big impact on their lives; the …
 
Helen talks to Joanna Cohen about the relationship between patriotism and consumption and how American attitudes towards consumption changed over the 19th century, particularly in response to the American Civil War. The ways people thought about the American flag, for instance, are particularly insightful as tools for understanding their attitudes …
 
Helen and Marion talk about the man that shaped the English literary canon, Geoffrey Chaucer. They discuss his life and his legacy, and how the son of a vintner came to write such an influential text.This will be the last episode for a while as Helen takes a well-earned break.Producer: Peter Curry See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out infor…
 
Helen takes a deep dive into some gory medical history with Dr Richard Sugg, professor of renaissance literature in Durham. They talk about all manner of wacky medical cures, such as blood consumption and powdered skull, and how these were used by royal surgeons and paupers alike to cure themselves of diseases or to manipulate their enemies. Produc…
 
Helen talks to Dr Nicola Tallis about Margaret Beauford, who was instrumental in establishing the reign of her son, Henry Tudor, and thus the Tudor dynasty. Margaret had to balance her ambitions of power with her womanly status, which wasn't an asset when it came to the Tudor court, and yet she managed to wield significant autonomy. Nicola also dis…
 
Burn the Witch is a new collaborative podcast series between historians and podcasters Helen Carr and Rebecca Rideal, where they discuss new history in the media and in the world generally. They talk TV shows, movies, music, museums, archaeological discoveries, King Alfred, and viking beards, and more importantly, they talk about how history is rep…
 
Adam Rutherford chats to Helen about racism. Should we call race a construct? Why does Africa have the greatest genetic diversity of any continent? Where do common misconceptions about racist tropes come from?Producer: Peter Curry See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Witches were around a long time before they were tried for heresy and crop failures. Why did governments start to hunt and prosecute witches and why did people begin to fear them? Helen talks to Professor Suzannah Lipscomb to find out.Producer: Peter Curry See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
Emily Brand talks about the scandalous family of Lord Byron. They talk about Foulweather Jack, who couldn't find the right port in any storm, the Devil Byron, who squandered the family fortune and then outlived them all anyway, and finally Lord Byron himself, discussing his incestuous relationships and love for scandal. Producer: Peter Curry See ac…
 
Helen speaks to Helen McCarthy about the history of motherhood through the 19th and 20th centuries. They discuss feminism and the struggle for women's rights more generally, but Helen McCarthy is absolutely fascinating on the struggles that mothers in particular faced, and how they fit into the broader women's movement.Producer: Peter Curry See aca…
 
Hallie Rubenhold talks about the five women who Jack the Ripper murdered. Their stories, like those of many women in history, have been corrupted and mistold over time, and Hallie talks to Helen to set the record straight.Producer: Peter Curry See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
Jh̤anna Katrn Friŗiksdt̤tir talks to Helen about Valkyries, the mystical supernatural beings that choose who live and die on the battlefield, as well as women in the viking world more generally. Did women take part in raids? What did those who stayed behind get up to? Producer: Peter Curry See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
Professor Saul David talks to Helen about the Battle of Okinawa, one of the most significant battles of the Second World War, and yet one that does not occupy much space in Western discussions of the war. Saul espouses several theories, suggesting that it was the bloodiest battle of the war, and that it probably was the main reason that the America…
 
Welcome back to another episode of Hidden Histories. This episode is one of the many listener requests I have received in that past few months. Easter Island. Come and join the Hidden Histories team as we discover the history of this well known, but mysterious island. Check out our Facebook page for announcements and interesting historical facts. h…
 
Welcome to the first episode of 2020, thanks for sticking around while we made it through the holidays. What is at almost every party... what beverage can be called liquid bread....it might even be good for you. Beer! Join us on this dive in the food history of been and its evolution alongside humanity. Check out our Facebook page for announcements…
 
Helen and Emma talk about the rite of pilgrimage, and how pilgrimages shape the paths of the United Kingdom. Dr Emma Wells is a Lecturer in Ecclesiastical & Architectural History at the University of York.Producer: Peter Curry See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Sean Cunningham talks Helen through the National Archives, and they look at the incredible source material that not only allows us to look inside the lives of monarchs from Henry V to Edward IV and Henry VIII, but also to get an understanding of how they thought.Producer: Peter Curry See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
Neil travels to Cabrach, described as 'a remote, sparsely populated upland area between the Cairngorms and the Moray Firth in the old county of Banffshire' which was once a 'thriving hub of an illicit whisky industry', and discovers more about the regeneration project to develop a working historical distillery and heritage centre and hears incredib…
 
In Dufftown there lies a hidden history gem in local guest house, Tannochbrae. Discover more about the guest house in the latest episode of the History Scotland podcast. Tannochbrae is a place perhaps best associated with the fictional village introduced to us through A.J. Cronin’s short stories, Dr Finlay’s casebook. It was described as “a snug li…
 
Its mid-November Listeners. We Approaching the holiday season like a freight train once again it seems. But wait, it seems we missed a month-long event that's helping to change the face of men's health worldwide. No not beer and football, I'm talking about not shaving, for a cause. Take a moment and check out No-Shave Movember with me and see what …
 
I love this time of year, no not the fall or the cooler weather, but the spooky stories, costumes and fun family traditions that come about, especially during Halloween. Join us in this episode as we look into two of the most iconic entities of Halloween and their origins. Check our our Facebook page for announcements and interesting historical fac…
 
The USA's northern neighbor seems to have a specific representation in the eyes of American's, specifically the millennial college student. Canadians and the land of Canada itself has had a bigger impact on us Americans and the human race than most people are aware of or remember. Join me as we take a look at some of the things that Canada has had …
 
In this episode I chat to Jeffrey Dudgeon MBE about the gay experience of the Northern Ireland Troubles. Jeff is famous for having brought a case to Strasbourg which led to the decriminalization of homosexuality in NI. He is also the editor of Roger Casement's 'Black Diaries' and most recently wrote a short book about Montgomery Hyde. He was involv…
 
I love listening to stories of other cultures and how histories developed for people and places. As it turns out even food has a culture and history all of its own. In this episode I cover the history of the traditional food Ramen from Japan and how it became the cultural icon of a nation. Check our our Facebook page for announcements and interesti…
 
Dan Jones discusses the complete history of crusading, from Saladin and the Horns of Hattin, to figures who might not make the usual histories, as well as the tainted legacy that crusading has left behind.Producer: Peter Curry See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Welcome Back to another special listener requested episode. This is special Episode #3, whats the topic, no cryptic titles this episode! Check it out! Check our our Facebook page for announcements and interesting historical facts. https://www.facebook.com/HiddenHistorie/ Join us on our twitter page https://twitter.com/HiddenHistorie2 Send the show …
 
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זכויות יוצרים 2021 | מפת אתר | מדיניות פרטיות | תנאי השירות
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