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In March 1869, Mendeleev delivered a full paper to the Russian Chemical Society spelling out the most significant aspect of his system, that characteristics of the elements recur at a periodic interval as a function of their atomic weight. This was the first iteration of the periodic law. Come along with us as we explore the history of the periodic…
 
During the Cold War, cultural diplomacy emerged as an important aspect of relations between states across the globe. Exhibitions, concerts, performances, book readings, and film screenings captured the ideological message of each side, as they showed conflicting “ways of life” in the global Cold War context. Based on Theodora Dragostinova’s recent …
 
The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated the United States—and the world—in ways that hearken back to the Great Depression of the 1930s. In this country, in 1933, 25 percent of the workforce was unemployed, another 25 percent underemployed. We haven’t reached those figures yet, but there’s a very real possibility we may arrive there soon.Written by All…
 
Epidemics figure prominently in what we call “Early” American history—a past often animated by the meeting between Africans, Native Americans, and Europeans in the Americas. The idea that diseases such as smallpox, measles, typhus, and influenza decimated Indigenous communities in the Americas is a commonly held one. Like so many of our popular con…
 
From February 22 to 25, 1986, hundreds of thousands of Filipinos gathered on Epifanio de los Santos Avenue to protest President Ferdinand Marcos and his claim that he had won re-election over Corazon Aquino. Find out more about the People Power Revolution in the Philippines in this piece written by Mark John Sanchez.Narration by Nicholas Breyfogle.…
 
China has expanded its global presence over the last decade much to the concern of U.S. officials. Africa is a major recipient of this new influence, building on Cold War relationships first forged during an earlier era of Sino-American competition. Yet looking at Chinese engagement in Africa over the last 50 years reveals that increased power has …
 
There is perhaps no greater challenge facing humanity (and all species on the planet) than climate change. This podcast explores the top ten most important things you should know about it. Written by Sam White. Narration by Patrick Potyondy. Audio production by Paul Kotheimer.על ידי Origins OSU
 
On 20 November 1975, Spanish General Francisco Franco died in bed, signaling the unceremonious end of one of Europe’s longest dictatorships (1939-1975). Written by Andrea Davis. Narrated by Nicholas Breyfogle. A textual version of this podcast is available at https://origins.osu.edu/milestones/death-franco-spanish-civil-war…
 
The issues of race and racism remain as urgent as ever to our national conversation. Four scholars discuss such questions as: Since Race does not exist as a biological reality, what then is race and where did the idea develop from? What is racism? How have race and racism been used by societies to justify discrimination, oppression, and social excl…
 
HIV and COVID-19 have both laid bare that stark racial disparities exist in population health and in access to quality medical care in the United States.Written by Erin V. Moore. Narration by Dr. Nicholas B. Breyfogle.A textual version of this video is available at https://origins.osu.edu/connecting-history/hiv-covid-affordable-health-care-lessons.…
 
Beginning in the late nineteenth century, India played a pivotal role in global conversations about population and reproduction. In this talk about her new book, Reproductive Politics and the Making of Modern India, Sreenivas demonstrates how colonial administrators, postcolonial development experts, nationalists, eugenicists, feminists, and family…
 
The story of Israel's foundation has often been told from the perspective of Jewish immigration to the Land of Israel. In this presentation, Ori Yehudai turns this historical narrative on its head, focusing on Jewish out-migration from Palestine and Israel between 1945 and the late 1950s. Based on previously unexamined primary sources collected fro…
 
In July 1995, in the final days of the Bosnian War, over 8,000 Bosniak (Bosnian Muslim) men and boys were killed in the Srebrenica massacre. As the largest case of mass violence in Europe since World War II, Srebrenica serves as a poignant reminder of the dynamics and consequences of extreme nationalism, the long legacies that acts of violence leav…
 
We are facing a world food crisis of unparalleled proportions. Our reliance on unsustainable dietary choices and agricultural systems is causing problems both for human health and the health of our planet. Solutions from lab-grown food to vegan diets to strictly local food consumption are often discussed, but a central question remains: how did we …
 
Faculty experts from the Ohio State University Department of History hold a conversation about the first one hundred days of the Biden administration.Panelists:-Maysan Haydar, Lecturer and Graduate Student, Department of History-Treva Lindsey, Associate Professor, Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies-Peter Mansoor, Professor and Gene…
 
Eminent environmental historians from the Ohio State University Department of History share how environmental history informs our shared future in a world confronted by pandemics, climate change, droughts and floods, unstable food supplies, changing energy needs, and the threats of pollutants and toxins.Panelists:-Nicholas Breyfogle, Associate Prof…
 
The real origins of the iPhone’s power stems from the pioneering efforts of communication innovators that preceded the AT&T engineers of the 1920s. The story of wired long-distance communication really begins with the Western Union post-diggers who laid the first American transcontinental telegraph in 1861 and the Atlantic Telegraph Company that dr…
 
Shannon Gonzales-Miller, PhD, shares her dissertation research project that sought to examine the experiences of identity erasure, invisibility and hyper visibility for Urban Indian, graduate students who attended an historically and predominately white public university. She considers how prevailing, monolithic descriptions of Native students infl…
 
This presentation is an Indigenous autoethnographic study of a family’s story of survival through the Native American boarding school system. Although this project was in a part an academic exercise, it was also an effort to reclaim pieces of a family’s experience that was purposefully silenced and erased from mainstream hegemonic nationalist narra…
 
The medieval church gave birth to the misogynistic rhetoric that continues to hinder women’s progress in the West today, but it also witnessed the first real “feminist” rumblings of discontent.Medieval women were not content to be victims of oppression: they challenged the rhetoric, and when that didn’t work, they found ways to work around it. List…
 
With more than 80 million forcibly displaced people in the world and another 260-plus million international migrants, humans today seem to be on the move. Debates over immigration and refugee policy in the U.S., Europe, and across the world have become fierce and deeply divisive, to say the least, and will surely continue to dominate politics in th…
 
On World AIDS Day 2020, in the midst of another pandemic, Ohio State University History Professor Thomas McDow presented a close look at the historical factors that shaped the global spread of HIV, from equatorial Africa to the world.Thomas F. McDow is a specialist in African History at Ohio State University. He co-teaches a course with a microbiol…
 
In August 1942, the most famous battle of the Second World War began. More than four million combatants fought in the gargantuan struggle at Stalingrad between the Nazi and Soviet armies. Over 1.8 million became casualties. More Soviet soldiers died in the five-month battle than Americans in the entire war. But by February 2, 1943, when the Germans…
 
On the Season 1 Finale of Prologued, we look back and what we have learned over the last seven weeks and forward to what this means for the future of women in American politics. Season 1 Host:Sarah PaxtonToday's esteemed guests:Dr. Lilia Fernandez, Rutgers UniversityDr. Joan Flores-Villalobos, the University of Southern CaliforniaDr. Kimberly Hamli…
 
After 6 weeks of analyzing women's voting and activism, we finally turn to the final frontier: Public Office. From School Boards to the Presidential ticket, join us as we trace the bumpy road of women running for elected office. Today's esteemed guests:Dr. Susan Hartmann, The Ohio State UniversityDr. Michele Swers, Georgetown UniversityMayor Nan Wh…
 
During the 1970s, a counter-movement arose that challenged the feminists push for the Equal Rights Amendment. Today, we turn to Phyllis Schlafly and her fellow conservative women who saw what feminists' considered sexist discrimination as privileges that they had earned and refused to relinquish. Today's esteemed guests:Dr. Susan Hartmann, The Ohio…
 
The fading of former suffragist activism during the interwar period did not spell the end of the fight for women's rights, especially as so many women remained unable to exercise their citizenship.In this episode, we turn to the next era of women's activism, the Women's Movement of the 1960s and 70s. In the wake of World War II, the revived women's…
 
With the August 18, 1920 ratification, women's suffrage was now the law of the land. Theoretically all women should have been able to vote and that massive organizing power that brought the 19th Amendment to fruition to further "women's issues." Today, we talk about the post 19th Amendment reality that many women in the US were still barred from vo…
 
As the suffrage movement entered he 20th century, it gained momentum as a flood of states passed their own suffrage amendments and World War I loomed. However, not all women were supportive of the pending 19th Amendment. Today, we discuss the heyday of the suffrage movement and the women who opposed their own enfranchisement. Today's esteemed guest…
 
At the heart of the suffrage movement was a shared belief that women deserved to be full owners of their own citizenship and have the right to exercise that citizenship at the ballot box. But the suffragists agreed on little else.From the beginning, the suffrage movement was splintered into different organizations that advocated different courses o…
 
On the season premiere of Prologued, we confront the myth of the women's voting bloc in the aftermath of the 2016 election and during the 2020 election cycle. Then, to truly understand the truth of the women's bloc, we take you back--all the way back to the American Revolution--and learn that women in America have never been completely united. Toda…
 
Welcome to Prologued! Prologued is a publication of Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective. Origins, a joint venture between the Ohio State University and Miami University History Departments, and hosted by Origins historian, Sarah Paxton. Prologued is a serial podcast from Origins that performs in depth discussions of historical roots t…
 
Ohio State University Department of History faculty experts discuss the historical context of Election 2020. Panelists include: Paula Baker, Associate Professor, Department of History; Nicholas Breyfogle, Associate Professor, Department of History and Director of the Goldberg Center; Susan Hartman, Professor Emerita, Department of History; Clay How…
 
Ohio State University experts Melissa Beard Jacob, Ph.D., and Associate Professor Daniel Rivers discuss Indigenous Peoples' Day and the history of Indigenous People. Dr. Jacob is the Intercultural Specialist for Native American and indigenous Students and Dr. Rivers is a faculty member in the Department of History. This webinar was held by the Coll…
 
As national governments and the global scientific community struggle to contain the spread of the coronavirus, they have also spent the last few months confronting a different type of outbreak.Misinformation about the current public health crisis—which has either denied the existence of the virus entirely or framed it as an intentional product—has …
 
On the surface, HIV/AIDS and Covid-19 seem as dissimilar as two viruses could possibly be. Yet, the ways in which the Soviet Union reacted to the arrival of HIV/AIDS, and how it spread in the first years of the outbreak, yield valuable insights into our current coronavirus pandemic.Written by Svetlana Ter-Grigoryan. Narration by Dr. Nicholas B. Bre…
 
In geologic years, the Galapagos Islands are infants. Located on the perpetually moving Nazca tectonic plate, the islands were formed through repeated volcanic activity. Layer by layer, the islands have risen off the ocean floor, forming a chain that is approximately five million years old.Find out more in this piece written by David Bernstein and …
 
On the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment the Ohio State University College of Arts and Sciences hosted a conversation with a panel of experts. They discussed the legacy of enfranchisement, especially for women of color; the ongoing gender disparity in elected officials; and how history informs the 2020 election.Panelists included…
 
On August 25th, 1944, the Allies liberated Paris from Nazi occupation, ending more than four years of fear, hunger, and death. Learn more about this important moment in World War II, as well as the soldiers and civilians who took part in the liberation.Written and narrated by Lauren Henry.A textual version of this video is available at http://origi…
 
From Mao Zedong to Martin Luther King Jr., China has a long and complex history of interaction with African American movements for equal rights. Please join Ohio State University’s Melvin Barnes Jr. and Princeton University’s James Watson-Krips as they discuss Barnes’ research on the history of Chinese-African American interactions from the Civil R…
 
When we reflect on the history of government response to natural disasters such as plagues, earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, and now Covid-19, we discover that the expectation that central governments should play a role in recovering from such disasters can be traced back to the actions of three Roman emperors of the 1st century. This vid…
 
The Black Death was the second pandemic of bubonic plague and the most devastating pandemic in world history. It was a descendant of the ancient plague that had afflicted Rome, from 541 to 549 CE, during the time of emperor Justinian. The bubonic plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, persisted for centuries in wild rodent colonies in Cen…
 
James Esposito explores the history of the respirator and cloth mask."Because of COVID-19, N95 respirators and cloth masks—their availability and their efficacy—now dominate the news and are at the heart of often vitriolic public debates. Both futuristic and somehow archaic at the same time, millions now depend on their use to prevent infection of …
 
As the world grapples with the ongoing pandemic of COVID-19, it is important to remember that this is not the first but rather the seventh human coronavirus that scientists have discovered since the mid-1960s (four of which just cause a common cold in humans).A text version of this audio is available at http://origins.osu.edu/connecting-history/sar…
 
"Pandemics: Past, Present, Future" features experts from the Department of History at Ohio State University. From plague to influenza and HIV, learn about the history of global pandemics from our faculty in order to better understand the current Coronavirus pandemic.Panelists include Prof. John Brooke, Dr. Jim Harris, Prof. Thomas McDow, Dr. Erin M…
 
Recent estimates suggest that the 1918 flu pandemic claimed as many as 50 million lives around the world between 1918 and 1919, killing more people in a single year than the entire “Black Death” of the 14th century. As the world confronts a new pandemic, it is worth remembering the history of the “Spanish” flu and how it set us on the path towards …
 
On April 13, 1919, in Jallianwala Bagh, a square near the Sikh Golden Temple of Amritsar in India, British soldiers led by Colonel Reginald Dyer fired on an unarmed, non-violent crowd of Indians. Learn what led up to the massacre and its repercussions.על ידי Origins OSU
 
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