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Cada episódio desse podcast aborda um grande tema em evolução, com explicações cientificamente precisas, mas voltadas para o público em geral. Também entrevistamos pesquisadores que trabalham direta ou indiretamente com o tema abordado. Podcast produzido pelos alunos da disciplina de Biologia Evolutiva da Universidade Federal de Goiás.
 
Carry the One is a small team of young scientists at UCSF who are passionate about bringing science stories straight to the public's ear in an entertaining, digestible way. Tune in for stories ranging from current research to science history, from medical science to the natural and social sciences. -- Visit us at carrytheoneradio.com Twitter: @CTORadio Instagram: @carrytheoneradio To support the show: www.patreon.com/carrytheone
 
Behind every scientific discovery is a scientist (or 12) and a story. “Point of Discovery” takes you on a journey beyond WHAT we know to HOW we know it. Along the way, listeners will meet the sometimes quirky, always passionate people whose curiosity unlocks hidden worlds. Music by: Podington Bear. Learn more at: http://pointofdiscovery.org DISCLAIMER Point of Discovery is part of the Texas Podcast Network, which is brought to you by The University of Texas at Austin. Podcasts are produced b ...
 
Join the crew of Extension302 as they dive into current topics affecting YOU — the people of Delaware! Brought to you the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension, this podcast offers unbiased scientifically-based conversation featuring guest experts! Topics range from agricultural sciences to nutrition, mindfulness, financial literacy and more! -- This program is brought to you by the University of Delaware Cooperative Extension, a service of the UD College of Agriculture and Natural Re ...
 
Discover the power of Dr. Davis’ “liquid software for the mind” – vibrational frequencies hidden within the moisture of flowers, extracted into drops – that can overwrite one’s limiting beliefs. In the purest way, the drops transmit to us “enlightened natural guidance” so that we can more easily achieve our fondest dreams and wishes. Chapter by chapter the tale unfolds, telling the story of how great serendipity enabled an unlikely fellow to make astonishing discoveries one after another aro ...
 
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show series
 
We, like many animals, live in groups. We need these groups to survive -- but why? What are the benefits of group living? What do we gain from each other? What quirks of evolution drove us to band together, form collectives, and solve problems together? In this episode, we’re joined by collective behavior researchers Iain Couzin and Naomi Leonard, …
 
In our final episode, we're continuing the conversation about how institutions can perpetuate racial inequalities and the work that remains. We talk to a graduate student whose family has been touched by Penn and slavery across generations, a philosopher who weighs the past and future when it comes to the case for reparations, and a political scien…
 
When you think about the future of medicine, do you picture cure-all pills? Instant diagnostics from a drop of blood? What about going back to the basics with plant-based treatments with a side of spiritual healing?In this episode, we sat down with scientist and social entrepreneur Dr. Victoria Hale, co-founder of an ayahuasca tea company called Sa…
 
This season, we’ve spoken to experts about how institutions have perpetuated racial hierarchies. Higher education is no exception. In our final two episodes, we’re talking to students and faculty about the work that comes next. This episode features an undergraduate student whose research with the Penn and Slavery Project reveals truths about the r…
 
This podcast of the reading of chapter 13 is a continuation from chapter 12 that I read last week. This chapter, titled “The Incorruptibles”, refers to the pure power of specially mandated flowers that can accelerate manifestation of what we desire based on energizing spiritual means for accomplishment. In the commentary, after the chapter reading,…
 
Physical punishment, or spanking, is widely practiced in the U.S. and around the world, although it appears to be decreasing. Parents, caregivers and school administrators who use it say the goal is to prevent unwanted behaviors and teach children to make better choices. But does it actually work? And what long term effects does it have on the phys…
 
The inability to identify and call out lying and misdirection that can be observed on a daily basis would seem to be linked to a loss of perceptive ability and the inner intuitive knowing of what is true. Chapter 12 recounts a personal experience of mine that emphasizes the need for us to strengthen our ability to recognize and avoid cloaked dishon…
 
When Covid-19 delivered a disproportionate blow to communities of color, environmental hazards like air pollution, that are all too frequently present in these communities, was one of the contributing factors cited by experts. The idea that race is a factor in determining who has access to resources that allow a community to thrive is not so much n…
 
What do cancer cells and t-shirts have in common? You might be surprised! In this Young Scientist Spotlight, Dr Danielle Twum explains how she uses her communication skills and expertise to help doctors and researchers improve the way they treat cancer. In addition to working in industry, Dr Twum also works with AAAS IF/THEN to teach young students…
 
Introductory Remarks: Chapter 11 builds upon themes in Chapter 10 relating to how humanity is prone to be controlled by stealthy forces of Darkness masquerading as the Light. In 2021 it is glaringly evident why this is such an important theme. And it really does relate closely with our ability to experience and express who we really are, and to emb…
 
Introductory Remarks: I wrote Chapter 10 in 2013, and I never would have predicted then that such blatant forces of Darkness and consuming control would envelope the earth in just a few years. From the beginning of 2020 until now a battle is waging between light and darkness that is surely equal in magnitude to the epic depictions in two movie saga…
 
During the worldwide protests that followed the death of George Floyd, demonstrators mobilized to challenge the representations of history presented by some of the monuments and memorials that occupy our public squares. In this episode we hear from an anthropologist, a sociologist, and an art historian, who reflect on why there has been such a focu…
 
The Master Gardener concept originated in Washington State in 1972 as a strategy for handling an overload of home gardening questions and Delaware launched its own program in 1986. Today, our state has nearly 300 Master Gardener Volunteer Educators who volunteer more than 20,000 hours each! Find out how you can become a Delaware Master Gardener wit…
 
Episode 6 (the reading of Chapter 9) describes the unusual promptings that directed Dr. Brent Davis to take an expedition to Western Australia to find flower essences for his FlorAlive® product line that would facilitate manifestation of our twin flame or soul mate – the romantic relationship and the partnership that we hope for in our life. His tr…
 
Episode description: Chapter 8 details Dr. Davis’ amazing adventure in Jamaica, filled with serendipity, where he was led on a search to find – and succeeded in discovering – a much needed psychically protective flower – a shield against malevolent and destructive forces. Chapter 7 describes a pivotal experience for Dr. Davis that occurred in a spe…
 
The earth can’t wait, and it’s imperative that we are climate aware and are moved to action to maintain it. In this episode covering sustainability and climate change, we talk to Dr. Sheri Weiser, a physician-scientist at UCSF with a long history of researching food insecurity and climate justice. Dr. Weiser has been a Principal Investigator on ove…
 
Racism and discrimination are more than individual problems—they are part of institutions that have far-reaching impact. In this episode we hear from a professor of sociology, education, and Africana Studies who delves into discusses discrimination in higher education and explores how modern racial attitudes shape and are shaped by the places in wh…
 
Feat. Lillie Binder (Ag Council President) and Christy Mannering (CANR Digital Communications Specialist) For many decades thousands of people headed to the University of Delaware's south campus on the last day of April to celebrate Ag Day. This year's theme is "One World, One Health" and will highlight college-wide research on this concept. Find o…
 
Dr. Davis, reading from Chapters 5&6 of The Floral Hand of God: Secret Healing Codes of Flowers Revealed, describes the astonishing way in which he discovered the UNCUT Flower preparation method, now used in the production of FlorAlive® flower essences. The advantages of this evolutionary new process are compared to the traditional Bach flower esse…
 
As we worked on our third episode, the news broke about the shooting in Atlanta that left eight people dead, including six women of Asian descent. This tragic event comes after more than a year of rising violence against members of Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islander communities. In this special episode, we talk to Josephine Park, Professor…
 
Dr. Davis reading from Chapter 4 – an intimate and revealing description of the unusual spiritual awakenings he received and the trials he underwent after leaving Los Angeles. He did not know at the time (as he was launching into the development of his organic herb farm in Tennessee) that this would provide him the tools and insights he needed for …
 
The enslavement of Black people was supported by a legal system that including everything from laws preventing legal marriage to those restricting movement and access to education. When slavery was abolished, this system did not go away. Instead, it evolved to include Jim Crow laws and 20th centuries policies including redlining and urban renewal. …
 
Before this episode, if someone asked me what could be done to improve maternal and newborn health outcomes, one of the last things on my mind would have been “kindness” because that part should be obvious, right? Wrong. In this episode, we speak with Dr. Afulani and Dr.Walker, two faculty members in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and …
 
Reading from chapter 2 of the Floral Hand of God:Secret Healing Codes of Flowers Revealed, Dr. Davis describes an extraordinary encounter in the mountains of New Mexico that led him to South America. In chapter 3 he recounts how “magic” once again directed him where he needed to travel in Peru to receive a stage of healing with enlightenment.…
 
Contact tracing is a term that almost all of us are familiar with, but what exactly does it entail? As part of a collaboration with the Institute of Global Health Sciences (IGHS) at UCSF, we spoke to three contact tracing experts in San Francisco. From our conversations with librarian and manager at the Excelsior Branch Public Library Ramses Escoba…
 
Rev. Dr. Davis’ extraordinary and diverse background in holistic medicine (since 1978), ancient healing systems, and philosophy will become evident as you are transported on an incredible discovery quest with him. You will learn why he feels such extraordinary floral gifts from Nature must be revered and utilized as sacraments, for they can help yo…
 
Last fall we launched our podcast, “In These Times” with an examination of COVID-19 and its far-reaching impacts. We spoke with students and faculty who shared their personal experiences with the epidemic, along with perspectives drawn from history, science, politics and beyond. A recurring theme of our first season was the crisis within the COVID …
 
Let’s be real -- life can be stressful. For those facing early life stress, the consequences can even affect their very biology. Fortunately, Rebekah Rashford is a young Ph.D. candidate at Princeton University who is uncovering just how these stressors affect people. In this Young Scientist Spotlight (our 16th!), Rebekah Rashford shares how she beg…
 
When we get sick, we change our social interactions—we keep away from others and we don’t share food. It turns out, humans aren’t the only species to do it. According to a new review in the journal Science, when highly social animals — such as ants, mice and bats — get sick, their social interactions change, too. For example, sick vampire bats groo…
 
Roughly 4% of the world’s population is affected by a rare disease, and while we are learning every day how to better diagnose and treat these conditions, there is still much to uncover. Rare Disease Day, which lands on the last day of February every year, seeks to raise awareness and improve access to care for patients and families living with rar…
 
We don’t usually hear the words science and art together, but we’ve been misled -- science and art exist together on multiple planes, constantly informing each other in beautiful and unexpected ways. This is the second episode in our two-part mini-series on science and art. Here, we’re joined by visual artists and science communicators Kelly Montgo…
 
Did you know you could scuba dive for science? Well, that’s exactly what Gaby Keeler-May does in the waters of New Zealand! In our latest Young Scientist Spotlight episode (#15!), learn about how Gaby’s scuba diving class in Santa Cruz, California, led her to investigating invasive seaweeds in New Zealand!We discuss how she conducts each dive (safe…
 
You feeling stressed? Well, take a break from work and listen to our latest Young Scientist Spotlight with Sero Parel. Sero is a Neuroscience graduate student at Princeton University, who is interested in studying stress and how stressful moments can change the course of our developing brain. For Sero, their research goes way beyond any old science…
 
We don’t usually hear the words science and art together, but we’ve been misled -- science and art exist together on multiple planes, constantly informing each other in beautiful and unexpected ways.This is the first episode in our two-part mini-series on science and art. Here, we’re joined by choreographer-slash-educator Suba Subramaniam and compu…
 
On Wednesday, January 6, 2021, as legislators counted and confirmed the votes in the Electoral College, rioters breached the Capitol building, forcing an evacuation of the House floor, including Vice President Pence. The events unfolded amidst President Trump having urged his supporters to fight against the ceremonial counting of the votes. The rio…
 
New Year, new you, new …. ant? Dr. Balint Kacsoh, a postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses his work on the genetics of social interactions in ants in our latest Young Scientist Spotlight. Listening to this conversation, you’ll learn a ton of interesting ant facts, like how ants bites are used to staple together wounds in the jungle. Y…
 
Stephanie Renee is a non-traditional undergraduate student. After working in non-scientific fields, she decided to go back to school a few years ago to pursue a bachelor's in neuroscience with the goal of becoming a clinical neuropsychologist. In this spotlight interview, she shares her experiences working in a metastatic breast cancer lab, her tho…
 
The tables are turned and our hosts are placed in the hot seat to recap and review topics, trivia and Extension memories from one of the wildest years we can remember. Travel back with us through the creation of this podcast, revisit some of our earliest episodes and find out about what's to come in 2021!…
 
“All day strong, all day long”, “the painkiller hospitals use most”, “the extra strength pain reliever”. We see pain reducing drugs like Advil and Aleve advertised all the time. But how do these drugs actually work? Can they relieve all types of pain? What about prescription drugs? Why are opioids the best we have, and awful at the same time? How a…
 
The worldwide scale and scope of discontinuity, loss, and uncertainty has made the year of the pandemic like no other in recent memory. How are we processing this moment, and how do we move forward? In this episode, we talk to three students, who share how the COVID crisis has reshaped their undergraduate experience at Penn and their visions for th…
 
COVID-19 wasn’t the only health crisis of 2020. In June, the American Medical Association and the American Public Health Association declared that police violence, particularly against Black and brown communities, is a public health crisis that demands attention and action. Widespread protests drew attention this summer, but where do we go from the…
 
For this eleventh installment of “The Spotlight” we interviewed Oluwasegun Akiniyi, a bioengineering masters student at Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile Ife, Osun State, Nigeria. We talked about his education journey and current research endeavors using a robotic device to rehabilitate the hand of stroke patients. We discussed how his identity inf…
 
A brain is very computationally efficient – you can look at a group of objects and your brain will instantly calculate the average features (size, orientation, etc). But how fast is this process – can it even be done with images that flash by so quickly you aren’t sure if you even saw them? To learn more, we interviewed Maria Servetnik, a Master’s …
 
Each year, an estimated 48 million Americans become ill (and 3,000 die) as a result of eating food contaminated by harmful microbes. You might think you know how to avoid foodborne illness, but chances are, you're routinely committing one — or a few — dangerous food prep or serving mistakes. (We just learned we are!) In this episode, the crew sits …
 
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זכויות יוצרים 2021 | מפת אתר | מדיניות פרטיות | תנאי השירות
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