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When SSRI medications were introduced in the 1980s, there were hopes they could forever change mental-health treatment. Since then, many are still not as effective as they could be. Now, attention is focusing on psychedelics, such as magic mushrooms and LSD. In December, Health Canada approved some exemptions to the ban on these drugs. We look at t…
 
When people look for great design in a city, they're often looking up, and while some skyscrapers involve incredible designs, the wonder can really be found everywhere, according to podcast host and author Roman Mars. He describes how design affects behaviour, and why urban dwellers should appreciate the mundane but brilliant designs in the city. S…
 
Do Black voters generally lean toward liberal ideologies? Our panel discusses and perhaps dispels that concept. We welcome the Ontario government's Advocate for Community Opportunities Jamil Jivani; a former candidate for the federal conservatives, Lilly Obina; political advisor Frances Bradshaw; and Carmen Wilson, of the Conservative Black Congres…
 
Steve Paikin speaks to veteran former deputy minister Charles Pascal, who was responsible for much of Ontario's early childhood education system, helping to introduce full-day kindergarten. He shares wisdom from his five decades in the educational trenches, the topic of his book, "Leading from the Inside Out: Hard-Earned lessons from Education, Gov…
 
Any initiative to "build back better" for the post-COVID era will mean big spending, but what does that means for transit? Federal Minister of Infrastructure and Communities Catherine McKenna discusses Ottawa's recent multibillion-dollar spending plan for that sector. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
The Agenda's week in review begins with some gentle advice for our troubled times from psychotherapist and author Julia Samuel. Then, how the history of Black settlers in one Ontario town was almost wiped out; Canada's approach to vaccine diplomacy; why western nations don't try to export democracy like they once did; and Uganda's efforts in the pa…
 
In the last 15 years, the cause of democracy promotion around the world has been afflicted by what's come to be known as a democratic recession. To discuss what this means and why the idea of exporting Western democracy is problematic, we welcome University of Waterloo's Bessma Momani and Lucan Way; Crestview Strategy's Chad Rogers; and the Toronto…
 
History shows that liberal democracies are very delicate and complex political systems. Sheri Berman, a political scientist from Barnard College and author of "Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe: From the Ancient Regime to the Present Day," discusses the effort it takes to sustain the idea and practice of democracy. This is another instalment of …
 
Given that Canada has ordered more than enough vaccines to inoculate its population five times over, should it follow in the steps of China and India and adopt vaccine diplomacy as a means of asserting its economic and political interests on the world stage? With guests Bessma Momani, University of Waterloo; and Erica Di Ruggiero, director, Centre …
 
As Uganda marks the 50th anniversary of Idi Amin's military coup, we discuss how Uganda is coping today. And what is its future as its current President Yoweri Museveni enters his fourth term? Gerald Bareebe, York University; Derek Peterson, University of Michigan; and Rita Abrahamson, University of Ottawa. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy i…
 
The terrorist group Boko Haram has abducted and brutalized thousands over the past decade in the east African country of Nigeria - including more than 1,000 girls kidnapped from their schools and forced into unspeakable captivity. Canadian journalist Mellissa Fung set out to document stories of some who survived, and the bravery they've shown in fo…
 
A number of communities in Ontario were settled by Black pioneers in the 1700s and 1800s. Elise Harding-Davis, former curator at the North American Black Historical Museum and Cultural Centre, which is now known as the Amherstburg Freedom Museum; and producer and director, Jennifer Holness, president of Hungry Eyes Media, which produced the film, "…
 
No one gets through life without obstacles. Throughout a lifetime, people deal with countless changes both good and bad. For some, these changes create anxiety and fear, while others ebrace opportunity and thrive. Psychotherapist Julia Samuel's new book, "This Too Shall Pass," tells stories of people learning to cope with change, and offers lessons…
 
Ontario is far behind in implementing ways for correctional inmates to stay connected to their families. Eastern Ontario hub journalist Marsha McLeod has been looking into how the phone system works, what the progress is in bringing the system up to speed with current technology, and why it's important to recognize the value of connection for these…
 
The Trudeau government has introduced new travel restrictions to curb the spread of COVID-19. But how well do those measures address the situation? Steve Paikin speaks with Kelley Lee, Simon Fraser University's Canada Research Chair in Global Health Governance, who is helping the Pandemics & Borders global project; along with Frederic Dimanche, dir…
 
Bitcoin, the first and most popular form of cryptocurrency, hit a record value to start 2021. It's volatility has garnered a lot of questions about whether it's too late to invest in Bitcoin, if cryptocurrency is a safe form of investment and more importantly, how do they work? Field producer Jeyan Jeganathan offers up a crash course in this increa…
 
,It's in the genes,, is often the answer to why some families have a higher prevalence of mental illness in the family tree. But what role does trauma and adverse childhood experiences play? How can those experiences echo through the generations? And does the prevailing genetic view sideline trauma and inhibit individuals from engaging with their p…
 
It's ,one of most paradigm-shifting and powerful stories in the history of medicine,, writes Donna Jackson Nakazawa. From MS to Parkinson's to Lupus and depression and schizophrenia the microglia, a tiny brain cell, is changing how we understand physical and psychiatric illness. Nakazawa joins to discuss her book, "The Angel and the Assassin: The T…
 
Daniel Robinson's new book, "Cigarette Nation," draws a link between cigarette marketing strategies of the 1950s and today's global pandemic and examines the history of smoking to discover why Canadians continued to light up despite the health risks. Robinson, a historian and associate professor in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at th…
 
Is alcohol more harmful than many Canadians may think? Tim Stockwell, a scientist at the Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research; Erin Hobin, a scientist at Public Health Ontario; and Leslie Buckley, chief of addictions at CAMH discuss the consequences of alcohol consumption and drinking habits before and during Covid-19. What role could camp…
 
Researchers at McGill University have found that child marriage is not only legal in Canada but has been happening across the country for decades, even in spite of efforts by the federal government to clamp down on the practice overseas. Why does it persist and what can be done about it? We discuss the scope of the problem and potential solutions w…
 
The construction industry in Canada has a racism problem. The Agenda examines the progress in creating an inclusive workforce and in leadership positions. Steve Paikin also learns about a new association is addressing systemic racism in the construction industry. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
Shorting, short squeezing, pair trading - these are just a few of the terms that investors, both retail and institutional, bandy about when discussing activity in the stock market. Greg Taylor, chief investment officer at Purpose Investments, helps us understand what stock-market lingo means? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
Last week saw huge movement in the stocks of several struggling companies, including GameStop (EB Games in Canada) and AMC. Behind it was an army of Redditors making large bets to trap hedge funds. It was a historic day in the market, but does it signal lasting change? The Agenda discusses the role of free trading apps and social media on the stock…
 
An update on Ontario's plans for returning students to in-classroom learning. Then, what's behind Laurentian University's financial woes? With guests: Alex Usher, president, Higher Education Strategy Associates; and Globe and Mail education reporter Caroline Alphonso. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
Since 2019, the Ontario government has issued more than 30 municipal zoning orders. In comparison, a total of 50 MZOs were issued between 1969 and 2000. One in particular is causing some contention, even among a group of students who've been lobbying the Ontario government to reverse its decision on Duffins Creek, near Pickering. They're worried ab…
 
Our review of this week's Agenda episodes begins with a look at how to prevent, manage, and treat non-sport related concussions. Then, can a new president south of the border help keep preserve the Great Lakes? The Globe and Mail's Robyn Doolittle reveals what a team of investigative reporters found out about the wage and power gap in Canada's publ…
 
Multiculturalism has become the guiding light of Canadian democracy. While Europe has been struggling with the question of how to marry multiculturalism with liberal democracy, Canada has managed to reconcile one with the other better than any other nation. To explain how it happened, we welcome Keith Banting, Canada's leading scholar on the politi…
 
Polarization is very much part and parcel of contemporary politics. More so in some countries than in others. But what attitudes and sensibilities contribute to polarization? To discuss this, we invited Calgary-based journalist Jen Gerson; McGill University professor Andrew Potter; Fredericton-based writer Vicky Mochama; and Toronto Star's national…
 
More than two years ago, investigative journalist Robyn Doolittle and a small team at the Globe and Mail set out to determine why a wage gap between men and women in Canada still exists 70 years after legislation calling for equal pay for equal work. Instead they found that inequity goes deeper than that - women are stalling in middle management, n…
 
Kids, pets, strange or blurred backgrounds, or perfectly staged and framed video calls - the pandemic means people have had to think about how they present themselves in virtual meetings. Shauna Burke and Treena Orchard, two Western University health studies professors; and Kristopher Alexander, a media studies professor at Ryerson University, talk…
 
Once Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's parliamentary secretary and the only Black female MP on Parliament Hill, Celina Caesar-Chavannes grew disenchanted with politics and the Liberal Party and left them both behind. While she no longer has a seat in the House of Commons, the entrepreneur is still advocating for more people of colour in government. S…
 
Taken together, the Great Lakes hold 20 per cent of Earth's freshwater, are the size of the U.K., and have more than 40 million Canadians and Americans living around them. Today, there is also much less winter ice cover and more algae blooms and invasive species. With a new president installed in the White House and a new opportunity for the Canada…
 
Joe Murphy was the number one overall draft pick in the NHL. He won a Stanley Cup, made millions of dollars, and had a solid career. How did he end up broke, fighting drug addiction, and eperiencing homeslessness? Rick Westhead tells the story in his book, "Finding Murph: How Joe Murphy went from Winning a Championship to Living Homeless in the Bus…
 
From hockey to football to rugby to even soccer, there's been a reckoning over concussions and brain injuries. But what about outside of sports? At home, in schools and workplaces, the Agenda explores the other side of concussions. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.על ידי TVO | Steve Paikin
 
One year ago, the first COVID-19 case was reported in Canada. What have scientists learned about the SARS CoV-2 virus since then? And what about the new variants? We discuss the country's progress in treating the disease and how to best control it as the second wave of the pandemic rages on. With guests, Dr. Zain Chagla, associate professor in the …
 
This week's look back on our programming begins with how COVID-19 has disrupted Ontario farming. Then, how are people and businesses in rural Ontario coping with the pandemic. And, will movie theatres ever fully recover after audiences have settled into a year of streaming? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
With movie theatres shuttered across North America because of the COVID-19 pandemic, many wonder what's at stake for the silver screen. Will streaming become the dominant means by which people watch movies, or will movie theatres bounce back? Our panel includes the Toronto Star's Peter Howell; filmmaker April Mullen; Alexandra Seay, general manager…
 
The current lockdown - the second since the beginning of the pandemic last March, has severely handicapped small businesses across the province. In Toronto, where restrictions were imposed just before the lucrative Christmas season, shopkeepers across the city are worried. The Canadian Federation of Independent Business estimates Canada could lose …
 
Author Ron Deibert discusses his new book, "Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society," within. He is director of the Citizen Lab and a professor of political science at the University of Toronto's Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
The COVID-19 pandemic may be global, but its impacts are felt very much on the local level. The federal government has promised to "build back better," but how well has it addressed the specific challenges facing rural Ontario? Minister for Women and Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development Maryam Monsef helps us understand her government's s…
 
How are rural communities in the province faring through the pandemic. We discuss the effect it's had on local economies, public health infrastructure, as well as the influx of city dwellers to those communities. With Dr. Jennifer Young, family physician; Al MacNevin, mayor of the Town of Northeastern Manitoulin and the Islands; Marg Isbester, mayo…
 
In urban environments, poverty and homelessness can be evident at street level but in rural Ontario those facing tough times can be much harder to see. COVID-19 has made that more difficult and essential to address, as the gaps between services and people can be life-altering. Elizabeth McIsaac, president of Maytree, the anti-poverty non-profit org…
 
Last spring, the COVID-19 pandemic upended farming, from labour supply, to mismatches in supply and demand for agricultural products. To discuss how the year has unfolded from there, we welcome Sylvain Charlebois, scientific director of the Agri-Food Analytics Lab at Dalhousie University; Rob Lipsett, president of Beef Farmers of Ontario; and Mike …
 
The pandemic has laid bare some of the stresses and strains between property owners and their tenants. To complicate things, tribunal hearings meant to mediate disputes, have been moved online. That doesn't always work for everyone. Southwestern Ontario Hub journalist Mary Baxter tells us why virtual hearings may be inequitable. See omnystudio.com/…
 
The Democracy Agenda is a joint TVO/Toronto Star initiative exploring western society's commitment to the democratic process. The first modern democracy seems imperiled due, in part to Donald Trump's presidency. Will U.S. democracy survive this test? Will it take another civil war? To help us ponder these questions, we invite David Frum, staff writ…
 
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