University Of California ציבורי
[search 0]
עוד

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
Using carbon dioxide removal (CDR) strategies to mitigate climate change is a land-intensive endeavor. To capture one gigatonne of CO2 through direct air capture requires a facility & energy production footprint of at least hundreds, but potentially tens of thousands of square kilometers. To capture one gigatonne of CO2 via reforestation requires a…
 
Data is everywhere but how can it be effectively harnessed to answer questions and guide meaningful research? Cue the data science librarian! With a skill set that includes sourcing and vetting data as well as the ethical implications, the librarian is a key resource to researchers and students alike. UC San Diego's Stephanie Labou shares what it i…
 
As we age, our bones become thinner and weaken. For older people this can lead to life-altering fractures. Our bones are growing, living tissue made up of calcium-based minerals, collagen and other proteins. Understanding your bone health - how well the minerals and proteins are working together to resist fracture - can help you and your doctor det…
 
Who has access to data and what can be done with that data? Shannon Ellis, Ph.D., shares how she is training undergraduate students to be effective, inclusive and ethical data scientists. She discusses how data can be used, the limits of data science, and the barriers and biases that may shape data sets and potential conclusions. Series: "Data Scie…
 
What's the future of engineering education look like? This discussion by three engineers from UC Davis - Chancellor Gary May, Dean Richard Corsi, and Vice Provost Jean-Pierre Delplanque - focuses on the latest in educating the next generation of engineers. [Science] [Education] [Show ID: 38000]על ידי UCTV: UC Davis
 
Soil - that mixture of degraded bedrock, decomposing organic matter, and microorganisms that nourish the root systems of plants and trees - holds 4x more carbon than vegetation. By changing how we manage our soils, we can increase the rate of CO2 trapping from the atmosphere into the soil carbon bank, while at the same time enhancing the agricultur…
 
Rick Rosen, WME Agency co-founder and representative for writer/director Hagai Levi, discusses Scenes from a Marriage and the state of global television with moderator Patrice Petro. Rosen details the development of the HBO miniseries and the challenges of adaptation from Ingmar Bergman’s original Swedish television series. He explains the vision o…
 
This program looks at education and how the brain of adolescents primes them for learning. Caroline Hoxby, professor of economics at Stanford University and one of the world’s leading scholars in the field of education economics, says investing in education in early adolescents can have profound impacts on the continuation of learning through teena…
 
We are experiencing an accelerated rate of loss of species due to human activities. This anthropogenic phenomenon extends beyond extinction. It encompasses an expanded loss of biodiversity as the genetic diversity of species diminish, reducing gene pools to “gene puddles.” We know details of species extinctions events from the fossil record, histor…
 
There are many new developments in cancer care. This program focuses on three exciting areas of cancer diagnosis and treatment. Dr. Hope Rugo, a leader in breast cancer research, leads a discussion on tumor DNA with Mark Magbanua, Ph.D., novel imagining techniques with Dr. Courtney Lawhn Heath,and CAR T-cell therapy with Dr. Rahul Banerjee. Series:…
 
Thorold Theunissen, Ph.D., of the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shares his work using naive stem cells to model trophoblast development. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37674]על ידי UCTV: UC San Diego
 
One of the world’s leading scholars in the field of education economics, Caroline Hoxby’s lectures draw upon economics, neuroscience, and education. She shows that early adolescence is the point at which most people either join the path towards advanced cognitive skills or not. Hoxby argues that it is imperative to invest in early education. Series…
 
Humans now annually add more biologically available nitrogen to the Earth’s land surfaces than do all natural processes. For 3 billion years, available nitrogen had been the major limiting currency for life on Earth. The recent human disruption of the global nitrogen cycle is causing major environmental harm, including water and air pollution, mari…
 
What are essential tremors? In this program, Dr. Doris Wang explains that essential tremors are rhythmic, involuntary movements of the head, voice or extremities. Common neurological diseases associated with tremors are cerebellar degeneration, Parkinson's disease, and thalamic hemorrhage. Yang discusses how tremors are diagnosed and treated. Serie…
 
The Kumeyaay are native inhabitants of San Diego and Imperial counties and Baja California, Mexico. For thousands of years, the Kumeyaay people farmed the land and ocean, managed forest fires, manufactured pottery and basketry and engaged in commerce and trade. Stan Rodriguez, Ed.D., executive director of the Kumeyaay Community College, talks about…
 
One of the world’s leading scholars in the field of education economics, Caroline Hoxby’s lectures draw upon economics, neuroscience, and education. She shows that early adolescence is the point at which most people either join the path towards advanced cognitive skills or not. Hoxby argues that, in a highly industrialized economy like that of the …
 
Plastic is everywhere. There are 17 trillion tons of the stuff on the planet. While plastic is convenient and cheap, it can take hundreds of years to decompose. Michael Burkart, Ph.D., professor of chemistry and biochemistry at UC San Diego, works on inventing new types of renewable, biodegradable plastic made from algae, including the world's firs…
 
Amazing new technologies in developmental biology and genetics research are allowing scientists to begin to answer long standing questions such as – how does a single fertilized egg cell transform into a complex animal? Why does the embryo of a marine organism like a sea slug develop differently from that of a sea urchin? Join Scripps Developmental…
 
UC San Diego’s Last Gift study aims to identify where HIV hides in the body of individuals who are terminally ill from a disease other than HIV, like cancer, ALS, or heart disease. Karine Dubé, DrPH, MPhil, Sarah Gianella Weibel, MD, Andy Kaytes, and Susanna Concha-Garcia discuss the ethical implications of the study, the experiences of the partici…
 
This episode features Isabel Dees, who was the associate vice chancellor for the Equity and Equal Protection Office at UC Santa Cruz. She recently was hired to serve as deputy Title IX director at UC Office of the President. Originally from the Los Angeles area, Dees has lived and worked in Santa Cruz since 1998. She is the daughter of Mexican immi…
 
Journalist and Los Angeles Times columnist Jean Guerrero covers immigration issues and the current political climate. She is the author of "Hatemonger: Stephen Miller, Donald Trump and the White Nationalist Agenda." Her first book, "Crux: A Cross-Border Memoir," won a PEN Literary Award and was named one of NPR's Best Books of 2019. Her writing is …
 
In order to reach global net-zero emissions by 2050, we must remove CO2 from the atmosphere as well as prevent further emissions. Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) can be accomplished naturally -- through forests, soil sequestration, or mineralization -- and technologically. In fact, we will need both natural and technological CDR methods to get to net-…
 
Climate economists have created a value called the "social cost of carbon" in order to better understand the cost/benefit relationship of climate policies and regulations. The social cost of carbon is the cost to society from damages caused by a ton of CO2 emissions. This value is difficult to quantify, with factors such as future societal wealth a…
 
We are losing species much more rapidly now than in the last two million years! At this pace, we may lose a large proportion of vertebrates, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes, in the next two to three decades. Modern extinctions caused by human activities are higher than the normal or natural extinction rate which tells us …
 
This program discusses peripheral nerve diseases, including the anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems by Dr. Maggie Waung. Peripheral nerves control sensory, motor and autonomic functions and can regenerate though very slowly. Dr. Michael Wilson discusses difficult to diagnose neurological disease cases using advances in genomic tes…
 
The field of performance studies is interested in not just performance but how it intertwines with social and cultural contexts. It sees value in taking a scholar practitioner approach. Monica Stufft, PhD, shares how she uses performance to tackle issues surrounding the climate crisis and science communication. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Humanitie…
 
Filmmaker Ann Kaneko spoke with moderator Kelsey Moore about the process of directing and editing her documentary, Manzanar, Diverted: When Water Becomes Dust, which depicts an alliance between former Japanese American WWII prisoners, Native Americans, and environmentalists to defend their sources of water. Kaneko describes the decisions behind the…
 
This CARTA public symposia addresses specific examples of how humans have drastically altered the planet. Acknowledged experts will discuss clearly defined global-scale negative impacts on planet earth, our life support system (other than climate change, population growth and infectious diseases, which are well-known). Each talk succinctly describe…
 
The introduction of species into new environments has occurred throughout human history. While most introductions fail and most of those few that establish remain environmentally innocuous, a notable minority wildly proliferates in their new ranges. These invaders disrupt ecosystems and burden economies. Environmental impacts associated with invasi…
 
Beginning with Homo erectus at least a million years ago, hominins have used fire to engineer the world around them. The earliest uses of fire surely included cooking, changing the energy yields of foods. Such innovations altered the course of our evolution, facilitating the evolution of species that could adapt quickly using tools and social ingen…
 
Humans have adapted to meet their water needs across disparate environments over time using behavioral adaptations. Yet, as temperatures rise and freshwater sources become depleted, it is critical to understand 1) how populations modify their environments to meet their water needs, and 2) the consequences of these anthropogenic - or human caused ch…
 
In this program, Sat Bir Khalsa, Ph.D., talks about the practice of yoga in healthcare, how to elevate life purpose and meaning through its use, and the basic elements of yoga - physical postures and exercises, breathing exercises, deep relaxation, and mediation. Khalsa also explains some of the growing body of research on the benefits of yoga, inc…
 
Labor leader and activist Dolores Huerta, visual effects supervisor at Pixar Animation Studios Danielle Feinberg, and NASA aerospace engineer Aprille Ericsson join journalist Lynn Sherr to talk about what it means to be a woman and a leader in our challenging times. Sharing stories of childhood dreams, career challenges, social justice and more, th…
 
Human-made chemicals with the unexpected ability to interfere with our body’s endocrine system have become prominent contaminants in daily life. Because the hormones produced by our endocrine system create complex signaling networks that control our growth, maturation, fertility, immunity, behavior, and sleep, these endocrine disrupting chemicals, …
 
The world is facing a health crisis due to increasing rates of obesity and diabetes, and the consequences of this pandemic will accumulate over the coming decades. Simultaneously, climate change is accelerating and is already having devastating effects that will undermine our ability to feed the world’s growing population. In turn, our food systems…
 
In the U.S., there are close to 17 million cancer survivors. What does it mean to be a survivor? An individual is considered a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis through the balance of his or her life. There are many types of survivors, including those living with cancer and those free of cancer. In this program, Dr. Ana Velázquez Mañana ta…
 
Growing up in Los Angeles in a close knit family with a strong bond to her Cuban roots, Natalie Rodriguez, MD, knew she wanted to be doctor from an early age. She shares the story of how she found her way to UC San Diego to study medicine. Rodriguez also discusses her work with UC San Diego’s Student-Run Free Clinic Project and the importance of ro…
 
Moderator Stephanie Malia Hom joined Professor Joan Roman Resina to discuss Death in Venice and the work of filmmaker Luchino Visconti. Resina contextualized the film within the larger context of Visconti’s German trilogy and his long, storied career. He also discussed the film’s adaptation from the Thomas Mann novella. Resina examined the idea of …
 
Dilek Colak, PhD, shares the results of recent work identifying aberrant Ca2+ signaling in ASD astrocytes as a mechanism that contributes to specific behavioral and neuronal deficits. Series: "Stem Cell Channel" [Health and Medicine] [Science] [Show ID: 37673]על ידי UCTV: UC San Diego
 
In this inaugural episode of The Art of Change, filmmaker, film scholar and Dean of Arts at UC Santa Cruz, Celine Parreñas Shimizu, talks about her personal history as well as her vision for the Arts Division at UCSC. She is well known for her work on race, sexuality and representations, and is the first Asian American female arts dean in the UC sy…
 
There are 6 million Americans living with Alzheimer's Disease. This program explains the latest understanding of the anatomy and functions of the brain and how it relates to neurological diseases. Dr. Gil Rabinovici is at the forefront of novel diagnostic testing to detect Alzheimer's disease as early as possible. He explains what Alzheimer's is an…
 
California is a pioneer in researching the impacts of and solutions to climate change. Getting to carbon neutral - or net zero carbon emissions - is key to curbing our increasingly warming planet. Dr. Roger Aines of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory talks with Climate Now's James Lawler about the latest research on ways to capture carbon. …
 
A school environment where trust, community and inclusion are valued allows students and their families to thrive. Tony Smith, Deputy Superintendent of Innovation for the San Diego County Office of Education, joins educators Gabriela Delgado and Morgan Appel to discuss how we can work together to support equitable outcomes for all. Series: "Educati…
 
The pandemic brought swift change to the world of education but was it a temporary blip or the start of a great transformation? What is the appetite for change in schools and are we supporting a climate that allows for it? Educators Morgan Appel, Gabriela Delgado, and Lisa Johnson Davis kick off a series of conversations on the state of education d…
 
Moderator Jennifer Tyburczy discusses the production and impact of HBO miniseries Veneno with star Daniela Santiago. Santiago talks about the process and pressures of portraying transgender icon La Veneno, and the importance of representation both in front of and behind the camera. She detailed the significance of La Veneno, including her famous ch…
 
Our series bringing arts and humanities practice to medicine continues with educators Holly Walter Kerby and H. Adam Steinberg as they show you a simple and repeatable method you can use to explain your work to the public via story and poster design. Series: "Let's Jam: The Arts in Medicine" [Health and Medicine] [Humanities] [Show ID: 37996]…
 
UC Davis's dean of engineering, Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., P.E., is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. Corsi discusses "pandemic engineering" and approaches to disrupt transmission by reducing the inhaled dose …
 
Finding a mentor can set you on a path to success. Ebonee Williams, Ph.D., explains what mentorship can look like at every step of your academic career, how mentoring can help you beyond the classroom, and more. Series: "Education Channel" [Education] [Show ID: 37864]על ידי UCTV: UC San Diego
 
"Still We Rise" is a concert celebrating American diversity in music and the legacy of UC San Diego Professor Emeritus and pianist Cecil Lytle. This year’s program celebrates both the 25th anniversary of the Lytle Scholarship and the establishment of the Cecil Lytle Endowed Chair in African and African American Music. The concert features music and…
 
The use of yoga and meditation as complementary medicine is growing. In 2017, 14% of U.S. adults participated in yoga, according to NIH. Depression and anxiety are among the most common conditions self-treated with yoga. Yoga is relatively low cost, easy to access, has high social acceptance, and enables one to focus on the whole person. In this pr…
 
Loading …

מדריך עזר מהיר

זכויות יוצרים 2022 | מפת אתר | מדיניות פרטיות | תנאי השירות
Google login Twitter login Classic login