MARGARET ROACH ציבורי
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Some of the most beautiful and intricate creatures in the garden are not plants at all. A diversity of lichens are showing off right now on tree bark and branches, on stones, on unpainted garden furniture and even soil, more visible since many of the garden's plants have quieted down visually for their dormant season. Let's go on a virtual lichen w…
 
Author Marta McDowell, a gardener and landscape designer in contemporary New Jersey, has an enduring passion for digging into history, particularly into noted authors and their gardens—what she calls the “connection between the pen and the trowel.” She's written books from that vantage point on Emily Dickinson, Beatrix Potter and Laura Ingalls Wild…
 
It's been a strangely mild fall so far in the Northeast, where Ken Druse and I both garden. But as some recent overnight freezes served as a reminder: Get the must-do chores done or else, because who knows when the weather will lower the boom for good. On our lists, still: collecting some seeds of natives to sow later and cleaning and preparing too…
 
Designer David Culp sees the garden in layers, but not just the most obvious landscape ones most of us do—meaning the canopy, the shrub layer and ground-covering plants. His view of the garden is more like 3D chess and then some: layers of color, texture, shape, and even the layer of time. He's here to offer us advice for looking at our garden’s ma…
 
When I saw news of a popular new garden book called “The Heirloom Gardener,” I thought it would be about growing vegetables or flowers of old-time, open-pollinated varieties maybe. You know: of heirlooms. But John Forti's latest book is about much more, about not just traditional plants, but traditional practices, too, that serve to connect us to t…
 
What are the forward-looking steps in your fall garden routine—the most important tasks you take now to get your garden tucked in, that really focus on success next year? Over at the part-farm, par-garden of Lee Reich in the Hudson Valley of New York State, his emphasis is on building soil health, and also on stashing his tender potted figs, so the…
 
"What do you want to talk about when we tape our next podcast segment, I asked Ken Druse the other day, and his answer was succinct. "Monocots," he said. To which I said, "What?" "I want to talk about monocotyledons," he said, using the unabbreviated name of one of the two groups that all flowering plants fit into, the other being dicots. And so we…
 
Have you made room in the compost heap for all that incoming organic material about to be created during your fall cleanup? Compost is today's topic with Associate Director Cary Oshins of the US Composting Council. And we'll talk about everything from best how-to practices to improve your results, to all those claims about compostable plastic bags …
 
I'm always looking for more places to tuck native plantings, and my current mission is along my property edges, where I'm adding a more complex layer of shrubs and small trees adjacent to the big old canopy-level ones to increase habitat for beneficial insects and birds, in particular. I've been turning to today's guest for suggestions, and now we …
 
I've been scouting around in my garden for orphaned plants, ones that used to be in visually pleasing clumps or masses, but because of expanding shade or a naughty vole or who knows what, aren't looking as good as they used to. Over in New Jersey, Ken Druse has been digging and dividing some perennials, too, but for different reasons. And that's ou…
 
Today we're going to get a lesson in winter sowing, sowing seeds in fall and early winter outside in a protected spot, a sort of easy DIY home nursery for making more plants. What we'll learn to propagate that way are specifically seeds of native plants—both meadow perennials, like asters and Joe Pye weed, and also various shrubs and even trees. My…
 
The days are getting shorter, and in my Northern garden, they're growing cooler, too. I know my houseplants will be screaming soon to come back inside, and then screaming all winter about the less-than-ideal conditions I'm offering, and how they'd like me to do better, please. Darryl Cheng does better, using all the technical insights he can to mak…
 
Today's guest answers even more Urgent Garden Questions each year than I do, in her role as plant clinic manager at The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois—including lots each summer and fall about caterpillars galore, from bagworms to gypsy moths and fall webworms. Besides being an arboretum and public garden, The Morton is a world-class 1,700-acr…
 
Here's how my head, which is always lost in the garden, I guess, works: The first thing I thought about when the pandemic started—when we got news of a new pathogen in the world—was how many plant pathogens I've written about in my career, and the trajectories of each of them. Dr. Margaret McGrath is a longtime vegetable pathologist for Cornell Uni…
 
Maybe you, like I do, have certain perennial beds that could use editing and some particular plants that need dividing in the process. That's just one focus of today's guest, Toshi Yano, in his role as director of horticulture at Wethersfield, a former private estate turned public garden in the Hudson Valley of New York, He'll tell us the how-to, a…
 
Texture and Variegation With Ken Druse - A Way to Garden With Margaret Roach - August 16, 2021 Ken Druse called the other day to say that he and his garden have the August lulls. The sort of annual dog days experience when it's way past spring, and still way before fall color, when maybe even some of the annuals you potted up or put into your beds …
 
In a recent industry newsletter, I saw a link to a story about the herbicide called horticultural vinegar, and clicked on it. And then, realizing how little I knew about this product that I see prominently displayed in every garden center I visit, I wrote to the story’s authors at Montana State University to ask them to tell me more. In our subsequ…
 
By the time we hit August, some plants in the garden are a little beat up—or have at least needed deadheading, or even wholesale cutting back, perhaps. As delicate as they might look texturally from the moment of their first emergence in spring, though, the ones that always startle me by their incredible toughness are the ferns. That's our topic to…
 
Don't answer this question too quickly; take your time and think it over. How many mints are you growing in your garden? When Ken Druse suggested the other day to me that we talk about mints on the show. I thought, "Spearmint, peppermint, what?" But then I thought a moment longer and looked around and realized there were mint family relatives all o…
 
I was at the local garden center the other day, when a truck full of tropical plants was being unloaded. And in the heat of a summer day, they looked like just the right choice to bring home to liven up the place. But which ones among the many choices could become what Marianne Willburn calls “best friends,” and carry over year to year without too …
 
How many bird species are there in the world and how many individual birds? And how do you even try to count? Do bird sweat, and how is their eyesight or sense of smell? What makes some eggs solid blue and others speckled brown, or are any two species’eggs the same size and shape and color? Well, these are just a tiny fraction of the disparate and …
 
I've been looking forward to connecting with Patrick McMillan, who last October took over as director of the exceptional plant collection and astonishing landscape that is Heronswood Garden in Kingston, Washington. Besides wanting to know what's next there at a place that's been known for a long time for its influence on American gardeners, Patrick…
 
I have a fascination for seeds of unusual edibles from around the world, and the other day on Instagram, I saw maybe the oddest one of all: What about growing a monkey puzzle tree from Chile from seed? And who even knew that tree produced edible nuts? O.K., so maybe that wasn't on the top of your list, but how about carrots that are gorgeous purple…
 
A story I wrote recently for my “New York Times” column took me on a fascinating, deep dive into the world of radicchio and put me back in touch with today's guest, organic seed farmer Brian Campbell of Uprising Seeds. Radicchio, with its long heritage in Northern Italy, isn't the only crop with Italian roots that the Uprising team is crazy about, …
 
Today we're going to do some multiplication, as in: make more shrubs, thanks to a lesson in propagating favorites like Hydrangea or elderberry or Physocarpus and more, courtesy of our friend and regular guest, Ken Druse. Ready to learn the basics of shrub propagation and have plants to share or to repeat in your own garden? You all know my old frie…
 
Looking around the garden as some of spring's show off shrubs and perennials fade, I realized how glad I am that I made room for some garden-sized trees too. Not too big and not too small, and the best of them are offering more than a single season of interest. Choice trees for the garden, and also some unexpected ways to use them is our topic toda…
 
Environmentalist and best-selling author, Jonathan Drori, says that for him, plant science is fascinating, but it's truly enlivened when it's entwined with human history and culture. In his new book, “Around the World in 80 Plants,” the followup to his hit “Around the World in 80 Trees,” he does just that. He enlivens plants both obscure and as fam…
 
Ken Druse and I are putting a new spin on weeding by giving it a new name: treasure hunting. Maybe the incessant, relentless nature of all those naughty things that keep popping up around the garden beds will be softened if we focus instead on the fact that we might just come upon some real goodies as we seek to rogue out the bad. Discovering treas…
 
One dimension of my friendship with today's guest is a years-long ongoing barter. She shares her cooking expertise with me and my extended family, and I give Alexandra Stafford and her husband gardening advice. It's a pretty sweet deal, and today Ali, creator of the indispensable alexandracooks.com website, is here to swap asparagus wisdoms, becaus…
 
I just read a book that filled me with wonder and awe. Now, would it startle you to hear that it was a book about wasps? Don’t cringe and turn away; listen as I talk to entomologist Eric Eaton, author of the new book, “Wasps: The Astonishing Diversity of a Misunderstood Insect.” The world would be a much worse place without wasps, if it were a plac…
 
It's Trillium Week the first week of May at Garden In The Woods, the headquarters of Native Plant Trust in Framingham, Massachusetts, the nation's oldest plant conservation organization with more than a century of history. Well, with a little help from today's guest, it can be Trillium Week in your garden, too, around this time each year. Uli Lorim…
 
I watched a Zoom lecture the other day that really put into words a lot of the ways my own deepening understanding of ecology is shaking up the way I practice horticulture—from spring cleanup, right on to the last chore of the active year. The speaker was today's guest, Rebecca McMackin, director of horticulture for Brooklyn Bridge Park, where she …
 
There's the so-called language of flowers, as in the symbolism or sentiment attributed to a rose versus a pansy or a daisy. And then there's the actual language of flowers in botany, as in what's a sepal or a tepal and a bract, or what's a perfect flower technically speaking? Those are some of the many eclectic lessons, both scientific historical a…
 
They're among the most popular and good-for-you vegetables, but brassicas—broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and the like—can also be a little tricky to grow unless you start with the right variety, get the timing right, and have a preemptive action plan to outsmart pests. I got advice on how to accomplish all that from Steve Bellavia…
 
Every time over the years that I've spoken to today's guest, one word comes up: oak. If entomologist and University of Delaware Professor Doug Tallamy sounds a little fixated on native oaks, it's because they are the most powerful plant there is, and he wants us to be very clear on that and plant them. In his new book, “The Nature of Oaks: The Rich…
 
Roses are ancient plants with a 35-million-year history on planet earth, so maybe it's no surprise then that they have been a fixture in nearly every culture and many religions, too. In his recent book, “Rosa: The Story of the Rose,” rosarian Peter Kukielski tells lots of the stories of this beloved flower and our relationship to it, and its place …
 
I met today's guest, Helen O'Donnell, at a plant sale a couple of springs ago, before the pandemic scuttled most such big public events. Spring sales like that, where multiple small growers of unusual specialty plants gather, are my favorite place to shop because I get not just unexpected new things to bring home, but also I get to learn from the p…
 
Do you remember your very earliest gardening books—the ones that transported you into the world of plants, whether that was last year or years ago? Or other books that have earned a permanent spot on your bookshelf as old trusted friends along the way? Ken Druse and I got to talking on the phone about our favorite formative volumes the other day, a…
 
You've heard the expression “companion planting,” as in: What plants supposedly “love” growing alongside what other plants? But how many such pairings are folklore, and how many stand up to research? In her new book, “Plant Partners,” Jessica Walliser looks at the scientific evidence and shares pairings that can help us minimize weeds or improve so…
 
Any gardener shopping at a local nursery or paging through perennial plant catalogs can't help but notice there are a lot of Echinacea, or coneflowers, on the market—more every year, including in unexpected colors and some with extra-showy double flowers. But how good are all these new cultivars as garden plants? And maybe more important, how good …
 
On the website of Far Reaches Farm rare plant nursery, shoppers can filter the plant listings by the usual expected things, like shrub or fern, or shade or sun, or hardiness zone. But there's also a filter for “shop by plant origin,” as in: where in the world each of the goodies hails from. And that filter hints at the fact that the nursery's owner…
 
The subtitle of Ellen Ecker Ogden's latest book, “The New Heirloom Garden,” tells it all. "Designs, Recipes, and Heirloom Plants for Cooks Who Love to Garden," is how it reads. Throughout her career of writing, and lecturing, and teaching about kitchen gardening, Ellen always reminds us, it's not just the literal harvest and what we can cook up fro…
 
Facing a forecast of heaps of snow the other day, Ken Druse and I got to dreaming on the phone together of more colorful times ahead. Of the emergence, not so very long in the future, of spring's first woodland perennials, natives that do their thing early beneath trees and shrubs. “Hey, let's make it another edition of our Desert Island Plants ser…
 
How do you build a better carrot for organic farms and gardens, and how do you grow one for the best results? I discussed those topics with longtime carrot breeder Dr. Phil Simon, who shared a fascinating little carrot history, too—like who knew that the modern carrot’s ancestors originated in Afghanistan? Phil Simon has been breeding carrots for m…
 
It will come as no surprise to regular listeners that I'm mad about small farm-based companies that sell seed grown without chemicals and with a regional focus. Seed matched to a particular set of conditions for best results. Today's guest is the founder of one such company, High Desert Seed in Colorado and even though I don't garden in the high de…
 
I'm on my third generation of seed-starting lights, a journey that began back in the day when shop lights with so-called cool-white and warm-white fluorescent tubes combined were all we gardeners knew. Eventually I moved up to newer, high-output fluorescents, and now maybe the switch to LEDs beckons. But how does a person shopping for grow lights f…
 
Parsley that was bred not for its leaves, but as a root crop. Or a winter squash with vivid green flesh, instead of orange. And perennial onions called potato onions that multiply. These are just a few of the wonders of genetic diversity I've been poring over in the new 2021 listings from the nonprofit seed cooperative called Experimental Farm Netw…
 
A neighbor with a new cold frame emailed me the other day, seeing colder weather finally in the forecast and wanting to know how to extend his season even longer inside the unit. Well, serendipitously, later that day I went to the post office and found a review copy of Niki Jabbour's new book, “Growing Under Cover,” waiting for me, and had some ans…
 
They're the garden's biggest residents, relative space-hogs who also dictate a lot of what goes on with the patterns of light and shade. I'm talking about trees. Today, Ken Druse and I are going to name some names of favorites, our desert-island trees, if you will—the ones we can't imagine gardening without. You probably knew it when you heard us t…
 
I've spoken recently on the show about my personal war on certain groundcovers I planted years ago that have turned out to be hideous thugs. Many other gardeners I hear from have likewise come to lament their overly cooperative, spreading plant choices, like rambunctious vinca or pachysandra. We all want groundcovers to do weed-suppressing duty and…
 
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זכויות יוצרים 2021 | מפת אתר | מדיניות פרטיות | תנאי השירות
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