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talkPOPc or the Philosophers' Ontological Party club is a non-profit founded by Dena Shottenkirk, who is both a philosopher and an artist. talkPOPc sponsors one-to-one conversations with a philosopher, who always dons our amazing gold African king hat! Various philosophers participate and it happens in various places. For example, we go into bars and have one-to-one conversations. Various bars, both dives and fancy. We go to Grand Central Station in New York City. We go to the sidewalk outsi ...
 
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show series
 
In answer to Flores' question, "What's the latest art piece that spoke to you?" Botti answers Robert Altman's Three Women, which is about conveying emotions instead of telling a story. Flores asks if movies can express pure emotion as well as music? Botti answers that movies rely so much on music, pictures, etc., that are borrowed from other art fo…
 
Nayanci Lopez, who hosts the philosophy/comedy podcast "But Why Not? A philosophy themed comedy podcast!" discusses with RP Olasov why we make art - do we do it for a purpose or is it just something that we have to do? If it's about beauty that's a bit of a problem because our notion of beauty changes over time. They agreed that although our notion…
 
Resident Philosopher Ian Olasov makes the point that even though the usual media you use to do philosophy - writing journal articles, etc., could be extended and one could also do philosophy through sculpture or other media. Joshua thinks of Picasso's Guernica and the reference to war - "what man can do to man". But also when we talk about "art" th…
 
Shannon starts with the belief that everyone is creative and able to make art in some kind of way, which she discovered when she first took a drawing and painting class in high school. Her new desire is to act, but feels apprehensive about it because, in RP Flores' words "you're on the line". They discuss the difficulties of performance and the lin…
 
Gaston discusses the effects of Covid on people and on art. For him, covid has made people rethink what they value and what they want in their lives. People have purged their homes, and rethought what they wanted. But covid has also had the effect on artists - lots of small producers have not been able to produce, and people now buy from ebay inste…
 
Summer of 2020: talkPOPc sets up next to the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn and speechwriter Marjorie Sweeney talks about social role of art. She agrees to the obvious fact that there is great individualism in art, but her point is that there are also great social and political functions. Wanting to create is a natural human urge & all children show thi…
 
Joan, a lawyer in NYC, got her undergraduate degree in art history, and here in the talkPOPc tent discusses the political role of art, comparing today's world to the art of the medieval world. Using Bronzino's chapel of Eleonora in the Palazzo Vecchio, Joan refers to the sociology of that world and how art reinforced power relations. Bronzino, who …
 
Justin points out that we find ourselves through thinking and we find ourselves through thinking about art. Everyone has a different interpretation - a different fingerprint. Ergo cogito sum. Subjectivity is everything here: Justin uses the examples of basketball and being black. The subjective experience is hard to hand over to someone else so tha…
 
A software engineer and a mathematician, Aaron argues that empathy is a central part of art, both on the part of the artist and on the part of the viewer. In order for the artist to be able to convey something they have to have empathy for how other people experience the world. But he also says that sometimes "art doesn't have to conform to well-de…
 
Ali, who is an amateur boxer, and a recent college graduate who wants to go into nursing, thinks of boxing as an art form. When Resident Philosopher Carolina Flores asks him why he thinks boxing is art, he says because "you can fall in love with it". And it must involve a practice. It is a skill-based practice. Cooking, video-games, etc., are all a…
 
Stephen, who worked until recently at David Zwirner Gallery, discusses the differences in the audience experiences in a gallery as opposed to a museum, arguing that museums give people a greater diversity of experiences. RP Flores asks the fundamental question: why should people go to museums? Stephen points out that they are re-designing themselve…
 
The fashion designed Hoover Chung speaks to Resident Philosopher Carolina Flores about his interest in gender-fluid fashion. He points out that it's not just feminine clothing on men's body, but it is something that "we are all experimenting with". RP Flores asks Hoover if he thinks that because fashion is consumed and worn by people, is it the cas…
 
Arion references the book The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study, by Stefano Harney and Fred Moten, which criticizes and tries to reform one's relation to the state and avoid being categorized specifically for the ends for state power. Identity is important, and Arion draws on his love of free-form jazz to make the point that we can be i…
 
The artist Bogyi Banovich explains creativity as where the body is trying to "catch up" to what the mind has wanted and designed. Bogyi discusses how art is setting up a goal and then the body tries to make the goal real, but with each physical step we re-imagine the mental goal and the two get merged: now we want this version. The important part i…
 
In a fascinating conversation about theatre and acting, the actor Kaya Simmons explains both why people act and why people go to see others act. "We act to tell stories, and we act to tell other people's stories, and to live those stories, and to live those truths and to tell those truths." The distinct quality is the actor's willingness to be vuln…
 
As an urban planner, Beth notes how the city is now reclaiming the public arena: the visual experience of the urban experience during the times of COVID show the nature of the social dimensions that have happened: the protests, the demands to give over some of the streets back to the public both for bikes and restaurants, etc. She explains how the …
 
Will, another one of our Participants who just happened to be wandering by and kindly stopped into the tent and had a conversation, is from South Carolina and likes both country and rap music because they talk about their pain and pleasures, and because they can tell you about how you were already feeling, but just couldn't really talk about it. "M…
 
Charles gives an extremely interesting viewpoint on the naturalness of aesthetics, drawing from the way ants build symmetrical ant piles, birds flying in perfect symmetry and order, and the great cognitive powers of octopus, making the argument that perhaps our divide between instinct and consciousness of behavior is false. He discusses how much is…
 
As a life-long practitioner in theatre, Steven articulates how it is that we use the journey as described by the playwright: we "exercise" our empathy, sympathy, ability to see things from another's point of view. He also discusses the interesting phenomenon of how it is a group exercise in viewing, as we respond to - either in agreement or not - t…
 
Art makes people do this introspective work. He discusses the civil war monuments in the south (in Richmond, VA) that glorify the confederate side, and notes the emotion that the pieces evoke in people. What does that art do the people who see it and how does it resonate to the collective? Richard and RP Shottenkirk discuss how the original subject…
 
Robert discusses the relationship of looking at art, listening to music, and eating: saying yes to those things that we like, figuring out why, and the essential part of enjoyment. As a language teacher, Robert thinks that understanding art is much like learning a language, and (as the ancients said) how similar painting and poetry are, as they are…
 
Ulysses discusses looking at art without the preconceptions of gallery owners or museum directors; he and Resident Philosopher Shottenkirk explore the value of bewilderment in art, feeling vulnerable in initially not knowing and the pleasure found in figuring it out. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/talkpopc)…
 
Dan Durso, artist and PhD student at the University of Illinois, talks about art as evolutionarily adapting, how it helped early humans to bond and work together as a unit, and how it allows us access into others' minds. He also discusses why it's a problem that contemporary art is without philosophical theory. Support the show (https://www.patreon…
 
Jeremy Barker, a performance critic, joins Resident Philosopher Carolina Flores for the seventh and final installment of our Postmasters Gallery series. Jeremy engages in art differently from the layman. He speaks of immediate entertainment value versus the long term process of art. You either grow with the work and evolve, or you engage with art f…
 
Beth Evans joins Resident Philosopher Carolina Flores for the sixth part of our postmasters series. They discuss visual art, in particular performance art as it gives more room for thought. There's a feeling in the moment that's not found in two dimensional art. You become a part of the environment and it changes the way you see the non art world. …
 
John McCarten joins Resident Philosopher Vincent Peluce for the fifth part of our postmasters series. John discusses photography as seeing through the viewfinder rather than seeing an artistic picture. He sees good light, a silhouette and composition rather than a creative energy. It's a mechanical process of capturing an image rather than expressi…
 
Caron Shapiro joins Resident Philosopher Vincent Peluce for the fourth part of our postmasters series. They discuss Hebrew music and the spirituality behind it. Nigunim are spiritual songs that don't necessarily involve cognition. It's a "direct shot to your soul" and the more spiritual a song, the less melody and lyrics it contains. Caron also dis…
 
Jesi Taylor Cruz joins Resident Philosopher Vincent Peluce for the third part of our postmasters series. As they discuss art as cognition, Jesi points to the restrictive nature of creating art for others/an audience. We make choices more carefully when others will see what we do. This raises a question of authenticity. Are we more willing to take r…
 
Nicholas Accetura joins Resident Philosopher Vincent Peluce for the second part of our postmasters series. When discussing art, Nicholas denotes a significant difference in our minds. When we create art, at least for Nicholas, we are free. We don't think about things and instead engage the body to materialize art. When we consume art, we are active…
 
João Enxuto joins Resident Philosopher Vincent Peluce as they kick off the first part of our Postmasters series. They discuss art as cognition, and João thinks of it as a medium for cognitive faculties, yet art is a text one reads. Art represents exceptionality, it doesn't just communicate raw facts, it goes beyond. But we still have to operate wit…
 
Keith Moss, a management consultant from the UK, and is speaking to the Resident Philosopher Martina Botti. Keith, on a business trip, is visiting the bar and having a drink; he steps over to have a philosophical conversation. They discuss what makes something art, and after Keith suggests it is when a reaction is triggered, Martina suggests that m…
 
The art historian and art critic Gilles Heno-Coe, who was the former Associate Director of Matthew Marks Gallery, speaks with Resident Philosopher Martina Botti. The conversation ranges between issues of meaning in art to the role of the market in determining that meaning. Repeatedly in their conversation, Charles Sanders Pierce appears. A nineteen…
 
The choreographer and performance artist Patrice Miller’s conversation with RP Martina Botti (phd candidate from Columbia University) starts out with Patrice asking Martina a definition of ontology and metaphysics. What is real. And how we define the real. This sets the stage for the very interesting exchange between this artist and this philosophe…
 
Destin was the winner of our raffle at our fundraising event at Postmasters Gallery in October, 2019. It was a contest to raffle off a philosopher, and I, Dena Shottenkirk, ended up being the philosopher who was raffled and Destin won the slot of being the talkPOPc participant. He gives a definition of art as something that makes people feel someth…
 
Kunning posits that the function of art is to give yourself a different kind of life-style. He says it’s a way of spending time that is not very “cost effective” - You are not thinking about how one can make money. But I then ask him: What are they getting, knowledge? He says no, novelty. But how does novelty, I ask, distinguish itself from distrac…
 
In this talkPOPc event, held in our tent in a park in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, we have two philosophers having a conversation about the current topic Art and Cognition: The Resident Philosopher Andrew Rubner from Rutgers and Sascha Benjamin Fink from the Otto-von-Guericke University in Magdeburg, Germany. Tackling the distinction between something …
 
As a lover and maker of fashion, Crystal talks about what makes both fashion and art in general meaningful to her. The conversation at first seems to hint at her thinking that something is art because it is emotional and makes her feel a certain way, and Resident Philosopher Rubner comments on that: he points out that she seems to think art is art …
 
After weaving in a discussion of writing and what happens in writing, Jasmine relates a story about the astounding experience of sitting with a friend outside, and between them there suddenly appeared a butterfly. And that was like art. She says, “We are not really aware until we are aware.” In art you are caught up in that moment, and everything s…
 
Mr. Raul Walcott, who is from Guyana and works as a landscaper, talks to Resident Philosopher Andrew Rubner about how the process of making something beautiful is a kind of art. The conversation in many ways is about the definition of art, but it also becomes a conversation about the function of art. Interestingly, it returns several times to the p…
 
Erline, a seamstress from St. Vincent, discusses the importance of clothes in her life: the personal associations with clothes. As a child living in a country where most parents couldn't afford to buy dolls, she instead dressed up a stick from the Breadfruit tree and called it "breadfruit baby". It would become real. Clothes do that: they make cert…
 
Flora, a performance art scholar, talks about the politics of the artworld's elitism (driven in large part by its role as a leisure activity), and also about the vulnerability of the artist in the moment of being public - the artist's vulnerability to the audience. It is an original and profound view on the role of voyeurism in art. She also addres…
 
Mark, an investment banker (and wanderer through Lincoln Terrace Park, where this talkPOPc was held), knows about math, and he knows about the aesthetic qualities in a well-formed formula. And he likes surrealism particularly the oddity of puzzle-teasing in surrealism: what is this thing I’m looking at? For him, art is personal kind of time-travel,…
 
Charlexia connects the amazement she feels in nature – parks – and the emotion that she experiences when in front of a street mural. Nature is in her view something that allows us the freedom to let our minds wander, not going in a particular direction. It is meditation through that freedom. It can be anything you want it to be, and yet it directs …
 
This conversation started out as a query about art and turned into a conversation about decision theory. Or more specifically about how creativity is just decision-making, much like science is. Angelie, an epidemiologist, begins with a quote from Nietzsche – that art is just leaving your mark. She talks about how children naturally want to do this.…
 
This conversation tackles head-on what art is meant to do. Jake takes issue with the recent 75 years or so of visual art, particularly since Conceptual art of the 60s or 70s. Traditionally art is, according to Jake’s view, soteriological. Now, literally, this means to give us comfort, to make us feel better. One often thinks of this in traditional …
 
This is part of talkPOPc's #3 project: Art as Cognition Marcus speaks about his love of diverse kinds of music- Indian, Chinese, Sukka. This is interesting because he has looked for a common thread in music and he sees it in certain kinds as a force for good and in other kinds of music as a force for bad. This bad kind he calls "Poisoning for the m…
 
This is part of talkPOPc's #3 project: Art as Cognition As a kindergarten teacher, Tom, in his conversation with Resident Philosopher Agule, is giving his experimental account of incorporating art into the education of children. The conversation yields a point: Art meets people where you are, instead of -- like testing -- meeting you where you shou…
 
This is part of talkPOPc's #3 project: Art as Cognition Marina has deep feelings about the kind of visual art she encounters in churches, particularly stained glass. She seems to have a dislike for the experience involved in perspectival vision where one separates the object from the background. It is an experience of the whole of the scene as a wh…
 
This is part of talkPOPc's #2 project: Censorship Pessy is a woman who broke out from a religious fundamentalist community, and she insisted on her right to gain her own education. She had the bravery to look back on that fundamentalist world, and analyze the censorship within that world. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/talkpopc)…
 
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זכויות יוצרים 2021 | מפת אתר | מדיניות פרטיות | תנאי השירות
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