Artwork

תוכן מסופק על ידי Sketchnote Army Podcast and Mike Rohde. כל תוכן הפודקאסטים כולל פרקים, גרפיקה ותיאורי פודקאסטים מועלים ומסופקים ישירות על ידי Sketchnote Army Podcast and Mike Rohde או שותף פלטפורמת הפודקאסט שלו. אם אתה מאמין שמישהו משתמש ביצירה שלך המוגנת בזכויות יוצרים ללא רשותך, אתה יכול לעקוב אחר התהליך המתואר כאן https://he.player.fm/legal.
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Ordained minister Rev Andy Gray, loves to turn what people say into art - S14/E07

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תוכן מסופק על ידי Sketchnote Army Podcast and Mike Rohde. כל תוכן הפודקאסטים כולל פרקים, גרפיקה ותיאורי פודקאסטים מועלים ומסופקים ישירות על ידי Sketchnote Army Podcast and Mike Rohde או שותף פלטפורמת הפודקאסט שלו. אם אתה מאמין שמישהו משתמש ביצירה שלך המוגנת בזכויות יוצרים ללא רשותך, אתה יכול לעקוב אחר התהליך המתואר כאן https://he.player.fm/legal.

In this episode, Rev Andy Gray, who obsessively drew as a kid, shares an incredible 30-year journey of graphic designing and how his art has evolved to become an editorial cartoonist, coach, and graphic illustrator.

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Running Order

  • Intro
  • Welcome
  • Who is Andy
  • Origin Story
  • Andy’s current work
  • Sponsor: Concepts
  • Tips
  • Tools
  • Where to find Andy
  • Outro

Links

Amazon affiliate links support the Sketchnote Army Podcast.

Tools

Amazon affiliate links support the Sketchnote Army Podcast.

Tips

  1. Practice using long-form, business-based YouTube videos.
  2. Network with other people.
  3. Photograph your work and link to it.
  4. Practice the "Something about" technique.

Credits

  • Producer: Alec Pulianas
  • Shownotes and transcripts: Esther Odoro
  • Theme music: Jon Schiedermayer

Subscribe to the Sketchnote Army Podcast

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Support the Podcast

To support the creation, production, and hosting of the Sketchnote Army Podcast, buy one of Mike Rohde’s bestselling books. Use code ROHDE40 at Peachpit.com for 40% off!

Episode Transcript

Mike Rohde: Hey everybody, it's Mike and I'm here with Andy, a.k.a Rev Gray. Andy, how are you doing?

Andy Gray: I'm doing all right. Thank you.

MR: It's good to have you. We were connected by Patty and Grant, good friends of mine who actually just finally met in Holland, just this fall. So really good to make that connection and have people out there. I've always got people out there suggesting people I'd have on the show.

So thank you, Grant and Patty. Probably more Grant than Patty, I suppose. But Rev, why don't you tell us who you are and what you do, and then go right into your origin story? How did you get here doing what you're doing, and all interesting tidbits along the way?

AG: Yeah. We're gonna go back a long time. So who I am, and what do I do? I'm a graphic recorder and I'm a children's and grownup book illustrator, and I illustrate magazines as well. Think of me—I don't know whether you've ever heard of a guy called Quentin Blake.

MR: Quentin Blake, I don't know that name. It sounds familiar, but I don't know him.

AG: If I say "Charlie in the Chocolate Factory."

MR: Oh yeah.

AG: And I say Roald Dahl, and I say, the person who illustrated Roald Dahl then immediately you start to get to know who Quentin Blake is.

MR: Got it.

AG: He's just turned 90, actually.

MR: Wow.

AG: And so if you take his style and you mix it with people from the other side of the pond, 'cause obviously I'm a Britt, people from the other side of the pond from your side say, "Oh, you look just like the New Yorker." So think of me as an editorial cartoonist illustrator, and you won't be far off.

I'm also a Church of England Minister. I've been in youth and children's ministry for decades, and I plant churches and stuff, and I train people and coach people. And basically, I try and help everybody to live life in their fullest. I'm also a DJ, magician, a dad, husband, and general mad person. I do everything I can. I get bored easy.

MR: Well, you fit right in the Sketchote Army podcast and in the Sketchote community, 'cause we're all quirky. I've been reminded of that when I just came back from Laiden, from the International Sketchnote Camp there. And loved everybody. You know, we're really community minded, but we're all quirky in our own ways. So you fit right in.

AG: Fantastic. Yeah, I've kind of got this target, and next time you do something like that, I wanna be there. So I was too late to take advantage this time, but I'll be there next time.

MR: Sounds good. Well, why don't you get into, like, where did you start from? You can go back as far as when you were a little baby, I suppose if you remember.

AG: We were talking just before we started rolling, weren't we? Okay, so this will make some people either laugh or they'll be sick. If you're eating at the moment, do stop. Have you finished your mouthful? Excellent. Good. Right. Because my mother tells me very reliably that the first time that I really I got into art was when I was in my cot when I was about two years old. In fact, probably younger, actually, I was just a toddler. So maybe about 18 months.

And when she put me down for a nap in the afternoon, I would take the contents of my nappy and I would smear them all over the walls. So, you know, it is early start in my expressionist period using brown pigment and various shades. So funny enough, she stopped putting me down after that.

I guess then I mean, I've only just in the last what? In the last five years, been diagnosed having autism or being autistic. I'm actually autistic because we prefer Asperger's or neuros-spicy. Which makes sense for a lot of the things which I'm gonna talk to you about.

But I couldn't sleep as a little kid, which is quite normal for autistic people, you know? And so, I'd wake up about 1:00 in the morning and I'd have pens and paper, and I remember so often I just would be sound asleep for about four hours. So I'd get my pens and paper and I would just draw continually for about four hours. And then mum would come in and she'd see me that I'd be falling asleep with pens and paper all over my bed.

And so, the next thing would happen the next night. So I obsessively drew, and that's kind of like always been my story. I couldn't draw that well. I used to always be jealous of my friends at school. They could draw really well and I couldn't, probably bit rubbish till I was about 14.

And then it started with me copying Bino. Have you ever come across Bino? If I say comic, the problem is, it's sort of like around the world, comics are kind of like superheroes and stuff. In the UK, we talk about comics and we're talking about sort of like cartoon characters in strip cartoons you might call them.

MR: Yes. We had this in the newspaper. I don't know Bino, though. That's not a character I know.

AG: Right. Okay. So it is that kind of style. So Dan de Bino UK people know exactly what I'm talking about. So think for you, it's the kind of simplistic style that you get with peanuts.

MR: Yes.

AG: And we have magazines full of that which is just fun. And I used to copy Backstreet Kids which people will know the name of over here, and I could get it so that I could draw them without needing to reference them. And so, I just did that and, you know, covered all my school books in Backstreet Kids and other illustrations.

And then you weren't supposed to, I went to a Deb Posh private school, and you weren't supposed to do that. And I did. It wasn't naughty, but I just didn't get told off for it 'cause they like recipe me work as well. So I drew all of this stuff. And then when I was 14 like I said, I couldn't really draw. And then my little sister was born and my dad took me away. And when he took me away, he I bought a book o pencil drawing pencils.

So we just done a whole day for two or three days, and I just started drawing from that book. And suddenly, literally overnight, it clicked and I was able to draw anything I wanted in pencil, you know, realistically or not realistic, however I wanted. So the first gig came in maybe about six months after that from somebody, and she wanted a picture of Peter Rabbit. So I drew it and she paid me 10 quid. I thought, "Ooh, this is easy."

MR: Wow.

AG: So, yeah. So back in the '80s, 10 quids is nothing to be shy of. So I did bits and pieces here and there, but I really wanted to be an editorial cartoonist. So when I got married in my early 20s, I self-study the style of how to be an editorial cartoonist. And it went really well. But I ended up working so hard. I was also working for a company called British Gas. And it was a regional office, and this, it was the size of a warehouse and it was just open-plan office space.

So, if you can imagine what that was like and what that did, I was right in the middle of it, what that did to an autistic brain, not knowing it was autistic at the time. And I was trying to get this editorial cartoon business going. And we didn't have internet in those days. Do you remember that?

MR: Yeah.

AG: We didn't have internet, did we?

MR: I was there.

AG: In the very early '90s, I had a fax machine. I was dead proud. And that was it, that's all we had. And so, trying to get the business in was really hard. And although I sort of like did—you know, the newspaper did pick up for a couple of issues, that was it. And I ended up burning out really badly.

And during that period, I couldn't have time off work with stress, somebody came to me and said, "Look, you know, find out what God really wants you to do." So I'm a Christian, like I said, I'm a minister. They said, "Find out what God really wants you to do." Within two weeks I'd worked out that really, "I need you to put the pens down," and just say, "God, what do you want me to do?" And within two weeks somebody came back and said, "Why don't you train for youth and children's ministry?"

So it's like, "Hmm, all right then that sounds right." And it came from so many places, people saying it, they didn't know each other, so I thought, "We're gonna do it." So dived into going training and I sat in the lecture theater, listening to theology. And it's sort of like getting fairly bored. 'Cause theology is quite a boring thing, really.

While everybody was taking notes, I didn't know taking notes. I learned how to mind map, I also learned memory techniques, and all sorts of other things. Just trained myself in the whole lot. But then when the thing interesting was happening, I just started drawing.

And so, I didn't draw anything particular. I just drew in the same way as I used to drawing my school books. So that was great. And then I found myself drawing a little bit for the college 'cause they wanted little bits and pieces done. So that was okay. Then I went to go and be a youth and children's minister, and I found that the art stuff that I did then became what I was doing as part of my ministry.

And so, that lasted for, I think about, we'll do rough figures about 10 years, and then I went to go and work for a Christian publishing organization. So they got about 10 million, 12 million pound turnover. And they did publishing as well as training people. So I trained people around the country and in the Northwest of the UK in working with young people and children and how to do it and how to help them get a life of fullness and all the rest of it.

And they found out that I could draw. And so, they said, "Would you mind drawing a book for us?" "Oh, that's quite good. Draw a book for you". And they paid nicely for them. Oh, that's all right, isn't it? And they said, "Would you do some more drawing for us?" And so, I had this side hustle of drawing at the same time, and it all went through their book. So I didn't have to do any bookkeeping or anything. And that was very nice.

At the same time, as we drew to the end of, I was doing more and more drawing for them. I was also learning how to be an entrepreneur and developing those skills of running businesses, but also lots of side hustles. So I got things going and I was trading mp3 players and all sorts of other things on the side. It was great.

And then I got a calling to go and get a dog collar. So, you know, it's the whole dog collary thing to be a church minister besides just a youth and children's worker. So, for me, it wasn't really an upgrade, it was just a development of ministry, and I was doing something else, but I was gonna become a pioneer, an ordained pioneer minister, which means planting churches in interesting places like coffee shops and things like that, rather than just going running normal churches.

And I knew that I didn't really wanna be in full-time, paid ministry because it ties you to the church. And I'm a minister for people who don't go to church. That's the kind of person I am. Anyway, I trained in theology. And while I was doing it, I went back to drawing at the back of the lecture theaters 'cause it's boring. I could write the papers, no problem, do the study and stuff.

And then one day, 'cause I mean it was pretty small, things that we were doing, small cohort. It was only about 40 of us. And we were just really good friends. So I was about 40-odd at the time. And I was really good friends with the lecturers, you know, 'cause we all just got on together. It is that kind of format when you're doing this kind of training.

And one of the lecture one day turned around, he said, "Would you draw what I say?" I said, "Sorry, what?" He said, "Would you draw what I say?" He said, "Well, yeah, instead of just drawing," he said, "I'd love to see what it looked like if you drew what I said." Oh, all right. So I drew what he said and he's like, "Oh, that's quite interesting."

So I then just started drawing what people said. Instead of drawing sort of like—I mean, I dunno whether people are familiar with what you might call Christian art drawn and painted in sermons and the like, but it's usually quite squirly-worrly. And it's usually got hands in it and it's usually got a dove in it. Sometimes it might be the story and that's about it and it's art.

But I wanted something else. So I started drawing art and then combining key phrases in there and making it part of the arts and doing that. And I just built on that. And then when I was ordained and I was a trainee vicar, if you like. So the best way of putting it, so cure it. Sometimes I wasn't lecturing , I wasn't actually leading, and I wasn't preaching.

So I'd sit there bored again. I can't stand church. I'm a minister who hates church I get bored. That's why people love my sermons and my talks and the way I lead church 'cause I get bored quicker than anybody else does. So that's great.

So I sat there drawing instead, and because I got in this habit of drawing what people said, I started drawing the sermon. And I would start by seeing, so we'd have a bit of a Bible story or a Bible passage, and then I'd draw the outline of that. Then I'd start putting in smaller elements of what was preached on within that bigger picture and where necessary adding words.

Great. Did that for about 10 years, you know. And then I found that throughout all of this, with the theology side of things and stuff, people started saying, "Andy, can we have a copy, please? It'll help us remember." Brilliant. There's no skin off my nose, you know. So they'd take copies, then they'd share them around and all the rest of it.

I did another job coming out of that because, after 10 years of church planting and all the rest of it, that was great. And then I decided that it was time to start moving away from being a paid minister. And I wanted to achieve being a self-supporting minister so that I wasn't tied to the whole—there's quite a lot of management involved in the Church of England now because you have to look after more than one church.

And so, there's a huge number of meetings, and everything else. I thought that's not me. I have to sort of like, be freelance, if you like. So little bit of prayer, "What do you want me to do, God?" And answer came back looking to try and work towards being self-employed and stuff. And then what should I do? You know, be an illustrator. I'm not sure I wanna be an illustrator again.

And then within two weeks of this conversation somebody came to me and said, "Andy, you don't remember me from college days 20 years ago. We were in the year below you. We've just found you on Facebook. Do you still draw pictures?" Well, oddly enough, "Yes. I've just started getting back into drawing pictures and being paid for it." "Oh, great. Could you illustrate our book for us, please?" " Don't wanna Illustrate books."

Spoke to a mate of mine. He turned around, he said, "You gotta illustrate." He said, "You can do whatever God sends you." Oh, all right then. Okay, fair enough. I did this one book, and it's not stopped ever since.

MR: One thing leads to another.

AG: Yeah. Slowly the price has gone up. Every time I've finished one book, another book—I mean, I've got, I think it's eight projects sitting on my desk at the moment of books people want illustrating. It's a nightmare. Anyway, can't complain. So what happened was, though that as I got out of this, so this was what? This was five years back. And I dropped down to working for the Southwest of England, training people in churches and to talk about their faith. Fun enough.

But carried on training people. And I've got a way of coaching and a way of styling how I train people. It's all the same thing. It's selling them the idea that they can actually do it. It's great. And so I can do that. During this time, I was illustrating more and more books. And then September last year, I realized that I'd started—the grant funding was running out this coming summer. So the summer is just gone.

And I realized I'd have to leave even earlier than I thought before the money ran out. So I said to the guy who was my line manager at the time, I said, "In one week I've turned down 3000 pounds worth of money. I can't keep going like this. I think I have to leave early." He's a brilliant Christian man. He said, "I think you do actually excellent and we'll help you to do it." What? So like, oh great. All right. Okay.

And I thought, "Well, I wanna see what God wants as well. So I said, "Okay, God, what do you want me to do next?" So illustration itself, I mean, I developed this very fast illustration style because the way of making ends, meters and book illustrates is you've gotta be fast and people have to like what you do.

So I'd really gone to this point of really refining my art style into a very, very posh art style, which took ages to do, and was very pretty. And people said, "Yeah, that's really nice. I really like that." And I get paid for it. But it wasn't quick enough to make an income.

And then we were just finished with the diocese, paid for us all to do coaching. Coaching, training. So I'm a trained coach. I'm not a coach, qualified coach 'cause I've not done the hours. But I'm a trained coach 'cause I've done the training. So take it as you leave it. So don't call yourself a coach, but you know how to do it.

And during that time, we had to practice coaching each other. And there were two really significant things that came up. One of them we'll might mention later, which is something about phrasing coaching. So it would be good to come back to that because I think it's a top tip is that one.

MR: Okay.

AG: But the other thing was I was trying to work out how to make ends meet. And I was in this coaching session with this bloke. He was coaching me, I was just having fun. And I said I have to work out how to make ends meet. It was then I realized that I had to dump my style of being very posh and fast, very posh and nice and digging ages, charge more, much more, and drop back to the fastest speed that I developed when I was 18, 19, 20 years old of this editorial cartoonist.

And it just so happened that the 20 years previously—20 years? 15 years previously, as I'd been doing the book illustrations, I got so fed up with posh illustrations what basically burned me out a bit on the illustration, that I picked up a book and this is gonna be one of my recommended books by a guy called Quentin Blake to basically for the people who couldn't draw.

Now I could draw, but what it did is it was so close to my style and I hadn't realized, I thought, well I'll read this book and you're drawing in it at the same time. It's brilliant. And you draw and you read at the same time, you draw what he tells you to. By the end of it, within 36 hours, my style had completely relaxed, and was 20 times faster than it was before.

And I started putting it on Facebook and people weren't just going, "Oh, that's nice." They went, "Oh wow, that's so awesome." And I'm like going, okay, faster, people think it's awesome and I can charge more, brilliant. So that became my style. And you'll see how that's relevant in a minute because 12 months ago, not sure what I was gonna do next. I of course start praying, saying, "God, what should I do next?" You know, and said, "Oh, I give up. I've got no idea what to do next. It's your job."

And within 24 hours, somebody gave me a call. I called him Matt Pritchard, and he gave me a phone call. And he said, "Andy", he said, "You drew for me 15 years ago a logo." And we've been in touch ever since. We're both magicians. He's much better than me. Much better. He's a member of the magic circle. I'm not. And he said, "Can you draw conversations?"

I said, "Oh, don't know. I've got no idea. What do you mean?" And he said, "Well, have a look at the Bible project." So I went on there and said, well that's the kind of style. Okay, right. And he said, "Do you wanna have a go?" And I said, "Well, let me look into it and see if anybody else has done it now."

So I thought, what could he refer to? And I thought, well, what is it? lsn't it a live illustration, maybe? So I looked it up and went, "Hang on, it's got a name. It's called graphic recording. I've been doing this for the last 30 years. What? And it's an industry. This is so cool."

So I jumped in with Benjamin Felis' course 'cause I had no idea. So I like to learn fast. And because of doing all the artwork, and so, I built up some money in the business for training and stuff. So I bought his course. So props to Ben on that one. His main thing was that really helped me was the reference to three books. To a few books.

And I saw a line finally between a TED Talk and what he was saying, how it was done. And I went, "Ah, I do do this already. It's not just called drawing in church, which I've called it for years. I can do it." So I've not even come across you by that point, you know?

MR: Sure.

AG: More conversation with Matt, and I said, "I'd like to do it on iPad 'cause then we can try it out and just link it through a video projector." And he said, "Well, I think it should be done on paper or on canvases or something. So I looked around, and well, you could do it on a big foam core board, but I thought, well, the people we are doing it with, were gonna be young people talking about faith and science and the link between the two. And I thought I can't draw it like that for you. Because they would feel guilty if they threw it away. Anyway, I said, we'll do it on iPad.

Anyway, it was in January just gone that I was going to a conference, and I thought, "Well, I know they won't mind if I sit at the back. But I wanna do it a bit more than just on a piece of paper. I don't wanna draw an iPad. I can do it on paper and see what it feels like." So I got myself four pieces of foam cardboard, which is about A1 size on its side.

But then I also got the paper and I used the foam call board as my board, a real lightweight board, and my previous easel of broker. So I bought myself a new easel dropped another a hundred quid on market pens and some paper. And I said to the guy, the tech guys that back said, do you mind if I just sit at the back with you? You know, it wasn't a big space. Only about 200 people there for a three-day conference and said, "Can I just sit at the back with you and just draw?" Anyway, so I did.

Quick cut ahead, the result of doing that means that the main people presenting then found out what I was doing. The fact that I could draw, become really good friends. And I've ended illustrating for them and recouping about 5,000 pounds worth of work of them.

That's beside the point, the graphic recording stuff. I've done books for them. They go internationally. So I'm an international illustrator, you see. I was at the back drawing and then somebody came up and saw what I was doing and they went, "Oh wow. Can I take a photo? I thought you were just doing normal Christian art, like everybody else's but this is different."

And then I even had one person—so people start taking photographs and I've got these small pieces of paper, I say small, but A1s or landscape all over the place being drawn in this style. I do focus on the art first, but I was trying at that point to say it was kind of like there was a bit of a popcorn method going on. But I wanted it to be artistic.

By that point, I hadn't quite managed to smush these two things together. You know, the style I used to do together with actually sort like trying to get data that people can hook in with. So I was like, "Oh, my word. Okay, yeah short Cushing photographs. For an artist, people taking photographs of your work is like, that's the best ever. You don't care about selling if you just, I mean, you want to sell stuff. You have people taking photographs, and you get excited.

And then I asked this lady, come up, looked at this picture, and burst into tears. I thought, "By it, what I done now." And I said, why? She said, "I can never follow anything that's said in these sort of things. And I feel so guilty about it. What you have done have made it so that I can remember what was said."

MR: Wow.

AG: And one of the things that my friend guided me on—well another friend actually, I got too many millionaire friends and one particular millionaire friend said to me, when I was trying to work out what to do, he said, "Well, how does your art serve people?" And I said, "Well, I dunno, really."

And digging around then we discovered that doing the art as the books is I help people tell their stories. So that's my tagline. But I realized that this person, I'd done an act of translation and later I found it was actually even similar to the way she reacted, was even similar to someone you get sign language if they're hard of hearing or deaf or deafened, because some people, they can't manage to remember what's said.

And so, doing this meant that it wasn't just exciting, and oh, look, my words have been drawn. And more recently I've discovered a better word is interface. But we can come onto that one as well if you like. So anyway, so I thought, well, I've never managed to do nine hours a day for three days on an iPad. It would've done my head in. So we're gonna do paper. So I phoned up, I can't remember whether you've had him on or not, but Tom from Inky thinking?

MR: No, I need to have him on. I need to have him.

AG: He would be cool. He'll be cool. I'll link you later at another point.

MR: Okay.

AG: But they're one of two suppliers in the UK for Neuland products.

MR: Hmm. Okay.

AG: And I spoke to them, and he was really good. And after talking to him, I decided I was gonna actually invest in the graphic wall.

MR: Yeah. I've heard that.

AG: LW hyphen X, you know, this sounds very cool, but you can expand it in all sorts of things. I mean, I've got now got five panels, so I go out four meters by one and a quarter-meters tall. So this thing's huge. I've even got the winders on the ends now, so I can do 25 meters nonstop, which is just so cool.

MR: And for those who are watching or listening who don't know what the GraphicWally, I think is, was the name of it. It's like—

AG: Well, the GraphicWally is the little thing.

MR: It's the little one. Okay.

AG: It's quite narrow and small. I'm talking about the free-standing job basically.

MR: Big guy.

AG: If you take a flip chart board and basically, you just stack them for 4 meters.

MR: Five

AG: It's five. Yeah. That's what I've got. All right. And it just keeps going. It's awesome.

MR: And I think it's got like a winder, isn't it? A roll of paper that you can continuously
wind it.

AG: It doesn’t unless you drop the funds on the new stuff, so.

MR: Oh, okay.

AR: So be aware this stuff isn't cheap. I think I've dropped about five grand on equipment so far.

MR: Yeah. I think that's the key of the GraphicWally, is it's a smaller one. I think they intended it for a camera or something, right?

AR: Yeah, that's right.

MR: Because I know Ben Felis has it, and it's got like a crank. It's got a roll of paper on one side and a roll on the other. And it's sort of like old school film, you know, you would drag it across and take pictures.

AG: Yeah. Well, if you 10 x that, literally 10 x it, you get what I've got now.

MR: Oh God.

AR: And the thing is that, I mean, this is a top tip for anyone wanting to go into graphic recording, go with looking like you know what you need to do. Now apparently, I might be wrong on this, but apparently Disney discovered this. So I go full lo place. So Disney they had a little bit of full feedback.

Apparently, Disney, Europe, I think had some feedback. The people thought that it was dirty. So what they did, they got more cleaners in and people still said it was dirty. So they then put their cleaners in yellow jackets. Everybody said it was clean. One of the things that I've established in the past is a Ballgame Cafe. So a community Ballgame Cafe.

I mean, I made the money through affiliate processes at Amazon to buy the ballgame for the Ballgame Café. Is great, and just left it there. So, community thing. But we recognized that if people came along to the cafe for the first time, 'cause the popup cafe and looked, I went, "Oh, look, you've got just a few games, haven't you?" They won't be impressed. In the end, we've got about 3000 pounds worth of games all through me raising entrepreneurial funds. So it all works.

And raise these funds to buy all these games. So people came in, it's like a sweet shop, they went, "Oh wow." Got excited and then stayed. And it wouldn't have been in the same way. And, you know, take the tip from Disney. I mean, I heard about Disney later, but I've always had since then, make it look like you know what you're doing by having the right kit.

The idea of all the gear and no idea isn't quite true. Because actually, if you go in and you've just got sort of like ropey stuff, you can have all the ideas and the, the professionals will look and go, yeah, I haven't got a clue. And so, you won't have that start of a 10 of them getting that first impression. You have a good set of kit, and they will look and say, you know what you're doing, and therefore they'll come with that mindset.

It is called the Pygmalion Effect, I do believe. So look that one up. Quite interesting. So anyway, so I invested in this kit, went and did this gig elsewhere in the country for my mate Matt. And we first of all worked with those from primary school age up to about 11 years old. And it was brilliant. It was great fun.

And then we did it again, and this time with teenagers. And the teenagers got well into the conversations. It was really deep, it was a really heavy day that they were talking about, science and faith and really digging deep.

I mean, they did heavy lifting. And I just drew it. It was a bit more text than I liked on it, but it didn't matter. And we ended up with this really big board of that particular one was three and a half meters long with all of their conversations throughout the whole day. And illustrated all illustrated. And at the end of it, these 16, 17-year-olds came up and photographed their own work.

MR: Wow.

AG: And it's like, hang on a minute, you know, you have done really heavy lifting and you've been excited about taking photographs of this work at the end of the day. And the holy grail of a young person's phone is their photo albums. And it's like, I don't believe this. So it kind of like went on from there. Then I started drawing for different people and carrying on sort of like, 'cause I mean, once you've invested, I mean, at that point it was about 2000 pounds.

MR: Now you have to use that stuff.

AG: Yeah. I've gotta use it. You know, even if it just benefits people. And I discovered I started putting things on LinkedIn about, you know, sort of like what I was discovering on the way through learning stuff still out, you know, building up relationships with a number of people. So, you know, Grant was one of those people on the way through and Patty as well.

And then there were other people. A guy called James Duro. Brilliant, brilliant chap. He worked in South Africa. He's just wonderful, wonderful man. And so, he's been doing it for 25 years. And Dario, I know you've had Dario on.

MR: Of course, yeah. Dario. I've had in on, yeah.

AG: Yeah. You've had him on. And he was just like really helpful. I didn't take part in his course. He just helped, which is just brilliant, you know?

MR: Yeah.

AG: So at some point I gonna be jumping in with him just to just pay for his course, say thank you for everything he's helped me with for free, you know?

MR: Yeah.

AG: And it was just been a right old journey. So in one sense, I've been doing this thing for 20, 30 years, and in another sense, I've been doing it for 12 months, which is bizarre. But I think for me, the most exciting thing was, you know, I did a very big gig on Thursday. So like just this last Thursday, gone, and they had sort of like these major, I mean, you've probably heard of BP and maybe Iceland. I dunno if you've heard of Iceland.

MR: Yeah.

AG: They had those kinds of people, really top-level people, and my top-level managers there at the same time. And there's a guy there from I won't say which big company it was, but the feedback you gave, I'm just gonna read this to you 'cause this actually kind of like encapsulates everything I'm trying to do. So remember, I'm trying to make art. So I'm coming from an artist's point of view. I'm coming from an artist's perspective rather than I'm trying to communicate.

And we can talk about, actually no, you do do art. Don't care what everybody says about how we are not an artist. Yes, you are. And I'll tell you why. But this is what this guy said to me. He said, okay. So he said this, "What became more apparent to me through the day with the benefit of using illustration to help capture and enhance the message, creating a new perspective, and helping people make necessary connections to understand the story."

So this was a day of virtual, nothing but data. And I was thinking, "How do I illustrate data?" And pictures were forming, so I just drew them. He said, "And although individuals may have taken away something different, it highlighted to me that a different perception of reality is often needed. People of the nervous system of any organization. Yet often the importance of people, their perception of reality and how they connect everything together is underestimated."

So what I do is I turn what people are saying into art. I will use as few words as possible to make it make sense so that it creates a bit of a dissonance. People have to solve the puzzle. Because when you solve puzzles, you get endorphins. You then, this is how Wordle works. You then share it with somebody next. You say, oh, I solved it. And they go, oh, I've solved it as well. And then they talk about it. Then endorphins work and community works, and then it becomes human.

And I realized at that point that from what I got the other day, I thought, that's what I'm doing. It's is interpretation, but even more so, it's interface between data and information, and even if it's told in story and creating an interface between that and people who are listening and watching, and it's making it more human.

So in a world of AI, when we're going faster and faster towards AI, me going in with my analog tools of paper on purpose, 'cause it's a choice I've made, makes it so that it makes that stuff more human. And the more human we can make things, I think that's the way forward for the future.

MR: I would think that because it's physical and it becomes more visceral, right? Like if you had done this on an iPad and even broadcast it on the same size screen, it might've had a similar impact, but there's something about that physical, like you can go up and touch it. Like those kids, those teenage kids can go up and touch their words that were drawn by you and maybe they can even feel the ink, right?

You know, like theres something tangible about it, right? Because the other thing is so much of our world is intangible, right? It's these photons and pixels and bits that we have control of, but they can change or they can disappear at any moment. And that's aren't real are real.

AG: One of real the big influences was when we had when Australian side paper or digital paper or digital. The team who's doing the school's work stuff sent me through one of their promo videos. And on it, one of the teachers, the head teachers from a previous session had said, what I love about this and this wasn't my drawing or anything else, this was pre-me getting involved, says that we spend so much of our time on iPads and screens to have the kids be able to come in and talk in and explore in an analog way. Is fantastic.

So when it was being suggested to me by one of the other team members, oh, let's just do it on iPad. It was like, but then we're just going back to the thing that the teacher said was not the unique selling thing. So I thought, I've gotta do it on paper because it has to be unique. And that's kinda like, just captured me.

I've always been, for the last 30 years, whenever the world goes in one direction, I go in the other direction on literally on purpose. So what are you all doing? We're not going digital. I'm not. So if somebody says, "Will you record this virtual? Will you do this virtual event for us digitally?" I'll go, "Nope." "We'll pay you money for it." "Nope." I'm only doing paper and I'm only doing in person. That's it. And I'm only doing it on big sheets as well. So if you don't like it, I'm not doing it.

MR: Interesting.

AR: Find your people, dig deep.

MR: There's plenty of people who will do that work and do it well. So I mean, they can't find somebody you can recommend them.

AG: I've got friends I can recommend, actually.

MR: I would think so, yeah.

AG: I do pass it on. That's if I can, anyway.

MR: It's good to know your boundaries because then you can be really clear and you can really lean into the specific elements that you've chosen to work with, right? That's pretty cool. And obviously, like you said, that you, you're not a typical churchman, right? You're the vicar for the people who don't usually go see vicars. So this fits right into your personality, I would think.

AG: Yeah. I lean into it. That and the autistic side I really lean into on purpose. And it's quite amazing how many people then talk to you about that kind of stuff and makes them realize that we've got a human face. Well, supposedly, anyway.

MR: It's funny. Your story of discovering graphic recording is not so different from my discovery of graphic recording. I started exploring Sketchnoting. I had no clue, just like you, that this whole community and "industry" existed. And this was, you know, 10, 15 years ago, I just stumbled onto it and realized, you know, the stuff I was discovering myself and building Sketchnoting totally matched the same principles that they were doing.

They simply did it large scale, in person. You know, maybe they were trying to be more neutral. A lot of graphic recorders just try to be interpreters, right? They don't leave an opinion. So yeah, that was a little bit different, but I mean, at the core of it, it was really similar.

And then, I don't know, was it 15 years ago? I was invited to come to the IFVP in Pittsburgh since I was nearby and spoke to that group and then became really good friends with lots of graphic recorders and see the relationship. But it's kind of amazing that you can have these ideas and sort of practice them and only later stumble into like, "Wow, there's like this community."

AG: Yeah. People pay for it. What?

MR: Yeah. It's pretty exciting.

AG: People pay for that. Okay, fine.

MR: I could do that.

AG: Yeah. Yeah. It's like, I don't even need to think and I get paid for it. I'm great. You know, it's awesome. It's awesome.

MR: So well, you know—

AG: I just—

MR: Go ahead.

AG: Yeah. no, I was gonna say, I mean, I mentioned earlier, didn't I? That I mean it's a big, it's a big thing. Thing for me is the whole thing about, 'cause I remember when you say, say that, so my brain really bounces between one thing and another. I think that's what really helps me to be able to do what I do.

And with you saying about IFVP, I remember, there's not that much on YouTube, you have to really dig for it. But I found one of the recordings of one from about, I think about 2017 or something, and I think it was Kelvy Bird, was saying "No, we are artists. Stop saying you are an artists. "

And I was trying to think about why is it that so many people, you know, sketch notes as well, who come across and say, oh, it's not you, we're not artists. You're, and, and I think you've got your little certificate, haven't you, saying it's okay to suck at art.

MR: Yeah, I think it's great.

AG: And I think one of the problems is that I mean, you might disagree, happy for that. The problem is that people look and say art is realism. So what they do is because they can't draw something realistically. They say, "I can't draw, so I'm rubbish and I'm not even gonna try it again." Whereas I'm trying to teach people and say, well, actually no, do you know when you do your letters in a particular way, that's as you are? If you haven't noticed, you can go and buy prints of letters and put it on a wall.

So I'm coming from a very much an artist's point of view, and I'm saying, look what art does—I discovered this in the Tate Gallery. Do you know the Tate Gallery? You're familiar with that? So it's basically, it's all modern art and stuff and made-up stuff. I say, made up. Yes, it's true. And here was a huge canvas. I'm saying huge. I mean, we are talking feet upon, feet upon feet by feet upon feet upon feet upon feet of gray canvas in this white room.

And he'd walk in, it was battleship gray. And it was like, what's the point of that? You know, why, why. So abstract art, always ask why, seeing what it does to you. So abstract art is about what's it do to you. Abstractionism is slightly different, but what's it do to you? And people are going, "No, that's a bit rubbish. That isn't it? How can that be in any gallery?"

But if you went up and you read the little plaque, the little tiny plaque next to this huge canvas, it says, "This is not saying that this is art. It is saying what does art do to the room. What does art do to the room?" So in other words, the gray canvas, it says this gray canvas wasn't here, it just be a white room. Now the gray canvas is here. What's it do to the rest of the room? Ignore the canvas.

And you had all sorts of things. You've got people having conversations, deciding what it was, and you start to realize that the aesthetic of art is that it makes people talk. It makes you think different. It has an impact. In fact, I'm always saying that art is not meant to be hidden away in a secret gallery. Art is meant to be responded to. When I do a piece of art, I say, "What do you think?" And that person says, "Well, I think this." And I go, "Oh, why do you think that?" Because it's the conversation it initiates, which is the important bit.

And I think that that's the point that when we do our graphic recordings when we do our big physical thingies, you are creating conversation. You are not trying to just sort of like having—you're creating conversation. So whether that's just in letters or images, it doesn't matter. And then you get to the point of saying, well, actually, what is art? So art is a triangle, and you've got a symbol. You've got realistic, and you've got abstract. And art falls somewhere in that little triangle somewhere.

So if you look at my style, which is like I said, New Yorker style, we're looking more about the symbol. Somewhere in the symbol artistic kind of element. And the more—sorry, symbol and realistic. And the more realistic you do something, the more people will notice problems with your picture. They'll notice it's all squiffy, whatever. But the more fun you make it, the more cartoony.

I mean, I can draw one hand bigger than another to make a point. Make a point 'cause the hand's bigger. And that's great. 'cause People say, "Oh, it's just a style, isn't it?" And they won't try and say it's wrong. So what I'm trying to say here is that you can actually draw, but just have fun with it. Don't try and worrying that away.

I haven't drawn a car that looks quite like a car. Instead you you can draw a car and say, well, if it's got these elements on it, people recognize it as a car. It's a bit like a symbolic emoji of a smiley face. It's really just a circle, two dots and a curve, and that's it. But you arrange them and compose them into the right way., it's now a smiley face.

And I think that so many people in the graphic recording and sketchnoting and visual thinking world have got it into their heads that they can't draw. And so put up these barriers saying, "I can't draw, therefore I don't do art." And not realize that actually what they need to do is say, "Actually, maybe I create art in a different way, and I could explore it."

And if they explore it and say, well, I can do art, then it might open the floodgates for them to be able to explore new spaces to go into and relax a bit. So yeah, it's one of the things I do. I coach people and train people in art as well. So, if anybody wants to know, I'll help them.

MR: That discussion came up in Laiden with my friend Ben Crothers, who's from Australia. And he was challenging, like, you know, 10 years ago when I wrote my book, my big mantra was Ideas, not art. It was positioned as so many people had baggage around art that would stop them from doing anything whatsoever. And the solution that I had at that time was, you know, let's focus on the ideas. Don't worry about the art. That was the message I was saying.

Like, you can put a few elements together and you're producing communication. And then the problem is over time, if you hold onto that, you feel like, well then I'm not an artist. Exactly what you're talking about. So we discussed that maybe the phrase could change to something more like ideas than art.

So in other words, you begin building the ideas and then eventually you realize you're kind of moving into an art space where it is art and we can learn from artists to improve and level up and keep growing. So that was something we discussed right on that same track.

AG: Yeah. And it's about just practice, keep practicing and trying ideas out. And also, I mean, one of the things which I'm interested with sharing the work which I've been developing with other graphic recorders is they give you feedback and initially find that what they're feeding back is their perspective on what it should be. One of the things about training in theology and I've done for literally decades is reflection and understanding. Reflecting, refine, reflect, refine, reflect, refine.

So I've developed now a filter process and reflection process so that I can look at a piece of work I've done and decide what needs to change. And then when you are working on something, don't try and change everything all at once and learn to do everything all at once, but instead, look and say, "Well, do you know what? I'm gonna learn to do this one bit better in my style. And then when I've learned to do that bit, I'm gonna learn to change this bit and do that over and over in the next thing."

So you're doing iteration and you iterate fast, but you just do lots of them, but then you are changing. If you want to draw cartoon characters, you know, learn to draw eyes, learn to draw ahead, what's your style of drawing head learn to draw the three-quarter view. You know, really most of the time you're only face on side on and three quarter. That's all you need to do.

Then you can do this like the clever tilting of the head and everything else. But just do those three, first of all, learn how to do it. Draw a ball, learn to draw a ball, and then do the half circley things on them. You know, it's not rocket science. It's kind of fairly simple, really.

MR: Take it a bit at a time. It seems like it is a good way to approach it and not leaving it to be overwhelmed pretty easily with the totality of what you could do. So focusing on small bits and keep on working. And then eventually it will all come together as a unit.

AR: Well, if people see my work, they get gobsmacked. They go, "Oh, you are so fast and you are so good. I can't draw anything." It's like, Yeah, that's 'cause I've developed slowly and because I'm an illustrator as well. One of the things that if you look at an athlete and they do drills, they slow it down and they go through the process. So if you watch an athlete practicing their hard link, they kinda like do this weird goose step kind of thing as they're just programming their muscles to do it.

And I think that actually if anybody wants to learn to draw really fast, go really slow and learn what it looks like really slow. Go slow, learn to construct, and then do some little sprint exercises of how quickly can you do it, and then go back and do it again. Go slow and then sprint.

MR: It's kind of a slow building process. That's really good advice.

AR: Yeah.

MR: We're almost stepping into tips, but we want to talk about tools before we get to the tips.

AR: Okay. I go all over the place.

MR: You mentioned Neuland, you mentioned the graphic wall.

AR: Yeah.

MR: Do you wanna get into like that kind of stuff? And do you do personal small scale stuff and sketchbooks with pens? Are there any tools that you, especially like?

AR: Well, I mean I will grab any bit of ground as they're called, any bit of paper or whatever. Some days I'll use pencils. Some days I'll use a ballpoint pen. It just depends what mood I'm in, you know. I like a good bit of color. I mean, you find a lot of graphic recorders they will use one, maybe two shade colors 'cause they can't flick fast. But as I've done my work and my family have looked and said, "No, we like full color best,"

So I have to draw full color. And I thought how I'm gonna draw quick enough. And then last week when I was working with a neuroscientist and he was linking together the ideas I was saying to be able to feed back to the group as we were working with these 200 people. He said, "I wonder what to do while you are drawing." I said, "I know you can be my colorist".

MR: There you go.

AR: So I drew, and then he would color for me. So, this I'm gonna have going forward. I'm gonna have somebody coloring for me 'cause it's a heck a lot easier. And I'll just put a little bit in and say, "What color do you want?" "I want that in pink". "Really? Yeah. Let's go pink." So I kinda like put really bright colors in. So I try to reflect the brand, but then I'll throw in other colors at the same time. So I work in that color spectrum 'cause I'm an artist and I love color.

MR: So, well, if you look at comics, I mean, you have the inker, you have the penciler, the inker, and the colorist. They are separate in that sense.

AR: That's where I'm coming from. We were doing tools, weren't we? Ignore the digital, I hate digital apart from when I'm doing the book. So we won't even talk about them. Procreate, you all right. You know. Oh, have you seen Procreate Dreams? That's exciting.

MR: Yeah. That's the newest one, yeah.

AR: Yeah. But no, I work in pure paper, but there's other tools as well, which I've just got. So those people who end up breaking their backs, carrying those big boards and the stands and two rolls of paper in your ski boot or your document tube or whatever. It must weigh about 10 kilos. I've just bought myself a camera bag a big 100 quid for all my marker pens. All right. So there's a top tip. You save money on big boxes and things. A camera bag is brilliant for all those marker pens and all the s spare inks and everything else.

But put all those is I've just bought for myself something called a Rock N Roller, which I think have built for gigging musicians. You get all types of them, but basically this thing drops down to about a half meter, but it'll stretch up to about a meter and a half. It's got stands on it and you can put a bag on it, a big bag with ends on it. It's like this giant Ikea trolley thing and it'll take up to 500 pounds of weight.

MR: Wow.

AG: So I can put all this in my car, I can put the little Stanley my car and put everything else into it and then wheel it all in in one go. Genius. I'm a bit proud of that. So tools, get yourself a trolley and stop wrecking your back in 'cause five boards is about 30 kilo. It hurts.

MR: Yeah. And you're gonna need your back to be performing.

AR: Oh yeah. You wreck your shoulder. So camera back and a Rock N Roller trolley to push everything in.

MR: And Neuland markers. It sounds like you're doing more with that. Yeah, the best.

AG: Yeah. Neuland markers and the biggest paper you can find and the graphic wall and all the rest of it.

MR: Cool. Well, let's shift then to tips. I think we've already got one, don't wreck your back is probably tip number zero.

AG: Yeah, I would. Very important.

MR: So I request three tips from people. And I frame it as someone's listening who maybe they're in a rut, maybe they just need a little encouragement. What would be three things you would tell that person to help them move forward?

AG: Okay, three. Right.

MR: It's not limited to three. I mean, you can go beyond three.

AG: Oh, might be going a few hundred, actually. I've go to a thousand sets. Gain contact with me, I've got some training. I hardly can't charge anything at all. Actually, I mean, at some point I was trying to come up with it with it already, but I've not managed to get round to it, but I'm gonna be putting a course together next year.

It's gonna be subscription-based 'cause the cost of entry into this world of graphic recording is huge. It's really expensive. And so, I wanted people to have a start of a 10, if they liked it, and then they can go and buy a bigger course or whatever. So that's the intro to the tips. But I would say practice, the biggest thing of all is practice. So practice going slow, practice going fast.

But one of the best things you could do, I think is find the long-form videos on YouTube. There's plenty of them. I would hate to say this, but dump Ted Talks, they're great, but they're so fast. You just feel depressed because you can't keep up with them.

MR: Can keep up, not when you're starting.

AG: Yeah, I've tried and it's like you know and some of them aren't all that good. So instead, what I suggest is go and find the long-form videos especially those based around business because then you are learning at the same time. Okay, so that's the first thing. Graphic record, the business ones. Okay.

Second tip, and I dunno if this works in Android, but it certainly works on iPhone. When you've done your practice of your business tip, right. Take a photograph of it. I mean we always just take photographs of all the work because iPhone, if you then type into search, it will search for the words that are actually on your graphic recording. Did you know that? Do you use that or not?

MR: No, I haven't used that.

AG: Which is brilliant because then it means, especially if you remember to write on the YouTube name of where you found it when you want to reference back to find the information—there are loads of things on there as well like book summaries and things. When you want to reference it, you can say, oh, I remembered that it was the name of this guy who did it. So you type it into your iPhone and then it'll bring up the graphic recording.

MR: That's pretty cool.

AG: What's more, if you say you want, if you wanted a subject on sort of like abilities. So you wanted to find out, well what is it about—lots of people I've heard recently have talked about the word ability and I've now written it a few times, right? So you type the word ability in and it brings up all the graphic recordings you've done on ability and now you can link the ideas together. So that's really useful.

And related to that is if you're gonna become a professional graphic recorder, it's stuck with me the other day. So this is new thinking. I like to give people new thinking. We are the best networkers in the world. And there's massive value in putting people who can network. But because we are going in to deal with different companies and people, we can network people together. So that's another tip.

And the final one I think we would say, which is which is very useful it's a technique which is called something about, and I got this from the coaching when we were being coached. So the way that it went was that is that you were put into partnership with somebody and you talked to them and you were told, right, "Tell them everything about what recently happened." So you tell 'em the story.

And then the other person has to tell you back everything they can remember from what you said. And you go, "No, you didn't remember everything. There's bits you missed." They said, well do it again, another story, but this time the other person's gonna summarize it into two or three sentences. And so, this time you go, oh actually you got it quite right there, but you missed this bit of this bit.

I said, right, you're gonna do it one more time with another partner. And this time you're gonna go say something about and give them one word. Okay? So you do that so you're listening and you finally realize you can't remember everything. So all that stress I try to remember you can't do. And so you just relax and let the whole ideas just merge. And then you get the kinda like this one idea that seems to almost evolve in your head. And then you go, "Is this something about this?" And you say one word and the other person goes, "Yes, that's exactly it."

And it's the weirdest feeling. When you experience this, you go, "I just felt heard." Now if you take that and apply that to graphic recording and visual note taking and sketch noting, you suddenly realize that you can use so few words, and the fewer words you use the better, which is brilliant. What I tend to do in my process is—I've seen people write on post-it notes and stick them up and stuff, and I couldn't do that.

If you get a 2B pencil, so this is the people working on graphic recording on big walls, so I have a top tip for them here. You can actually write on the wall with a pencil and from a distance of about five, six foot away, no one can see the writing, they can't see it. You write quite big, no one can see it. So you don't even need to rub it off at the end. So you write it in pencil as you're going along.

So when people start, they're often, like I'm doing today, waffle mode. They're telling stories, this is my history, it's got nothing to do with the thing they're gonna talk about. And you don't wanna capture that so you just start write it and just write out what they're saying long form if you want, just so you can remember the bits they've said. 'cause something might be relevant in the future.

And then suddenly they'll say something and they'll say it slightly slower and slightly louder and you'll go, "Ah, that's important." And then you look back at the notes and now you can take everything they've said and turn it into an image and then you're off 'cause now you're drawing at the same time as listening. So you can do that and bring all those things together. I think creates a rather exciting space.

MR: Well that's a great tip.

AG: I do apologize. That was rather a lot.

MR: I think you ended up with like five or six, which is great.

AG: Yeah, I know. We didn't limit it, so.

MR: I told you, you could go beyond three. So you know, you went however that you want.

AG: Oh, I could waffle forever, I'm afraid.

MR: Well Andy, that's been so good to have you. How would we find you? What's the best place to find you? Do you have a website? Are you on certain social media, LinkedIn?

AG: Yeah, you can find me on virtually everywhere. Well, I'll say everywhere. You can find me on Instagram, you can find me on LinkedIn, and even my website and it's onegraydot. So spell the American way. So I'm gonna spell it out for you 'cause nobody gets this right for some reason I came up with it years ago. So it's O-N-E-G-R-A-Y-D-O-T, all one word, not separated.

And it's all onegraydot.com, LinkedIn onegraydot, and so it goes on. And it's gray. So what I do is I start off with a big blank wall and I put one gray.in the center of it and I say it's no longer blank, so you can't spoil it, now it's got one gray.in it. And I say, what do we do? We connect the gray dots, just one gray dot at a time. So all links in into salesmanship.

MR: Yeah. That's pretty cool. And you know, while you were talking, I just for fun, I did a little search and brought up your Facebook page and at the top you've got an image up there. And what it reminds me of, like you said, New Yorker, for me, it reminds me of Red Bull. You know, the Red Bull gives you wings, cartoons. Have you seen these? It's exactly like that.

AG: It's all editorial cartooning you say.

MR: Yeah, exactly.

AG: So it's all sort like of the same kind of thing really fast. So yeah, best place to find me for sort of like this kind of stuff is probably on LinkedIn and Instagram.

MR: Okay. Well, of course, we always good show notes.

AG: Facebook is Rev, Andy Gray, if you really wanna know. So Facebook's Rev, Andy Gray with an A.

MR: Gotcha. And we'll of course put show notes, links to everything that can find and that we can bother Andy to send to us and put into the list. So if you're curious to see more, you can click there and check it out. Well, thank you, Andy. It's so good to have you on the show. Thanks for the influence you're having in the world and with people who maybe don't expect it and need it. Thank you so much for all that work you're doing. I really appreciate it. And thank you for being on the show and sharing your story. It's been great to have you.

AG: Well, thank you.

MR: And for everybody who's listening or watching, this is another episode of the Sketchnote Army Podcast, until next time.

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תוכן מסופק על ידי Sketchnote Army Podcast and Mike Rohde. כל תוכן הפודקאסטים כולל פרקים, גרפיקה ותיאורי פודקאסטים מועלים ומסופקים ישירות על ידי Sketchnote Army Podcast and Mike Rohde או שותף פלטפורמת הפודקאסט שלו. אם אתה מאמין שמישהו משתמש ביצירה שלך המוגנת בזכויות יוצרים ללא רשותך, אתה יכול לעקוב אחר התהליך המתואר כאן https://he.player.fm/legal.

In this episode, Rev Andy Gray, who obsessively drew as a kid, shares an incredible 30-year journey of graphic designing and how his art has evolved to become an editorial cartoonist, coach, and graphic illustrator.

Sponsored by Concepts

This episode of the Sketchnote Army Podcast is brought to you by Concepts, a perfect tool for sketchnoting, available on iOS, Windows, and Android.

Concepts' vector-based drawing feature gives you the power to adjust your drawings saving hours and hours of rework.

Vectors provide clean, crisp, high-resolution output for your sketchnotes at any size you need s ideal for sketchnoting.

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Running Order

  • Intro
  • Welcome
  • Who is Andy
  • Origin Story
  • Andy’s current work
  • Sponsor: Concepts
  • Tips
  • Tools
  • Where to find Andy
  • Outro

Links

Amazon affiliate links support the Sketchnote Army Podcast.

Tools

Amazon affiliate links support the Sketchnote Army Podcast.

Tips

  1. Practice using long-form, business-based YouTube videos.
  2. Network with other people.
  3. Photograph your work and link to it.
  4. Practice the "Something about" technique.

Credits

  • Producer: Alec Pulianas
  • Shownotes and transcripts: Esther Odoro
  • Theme music: Jon Schiedermayer

Subscribe to the Sketchnote Army Podcast

You can subscribe to the podcast through iTunes, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, YouTube or your favorite podcast listening source.

Support the Podcast

To support the creation, production, and hosting of the Sketchnote Army Podcast, buy one of Mike Rohde’s bestselling books. Use code ROHDE40 at Peachpit.com for 40% off!

Episode Transcript

Mike Rohde: Hey everybody, it's Mike and I'm here with Andy, a.k.a Rev Gray. Andy, how are you doing?

Andy Gray: I'm doing all right. Thank you.

MR: It's good to have you. We were connected by Patty and Grant, good friends of mine who actually just finally met in Holland, just this fall. So really good to make that connection and have people out there. I've always got people out there suggesting people I'd have on the show.

So thank you, Grant and Patty. Probably more Grant than Patty, I suppose. But Rev, why don't you tell us who you are and what you do, and then go right into your origin story? How did you get here doing what you're doing, and all interesting tidbits along the way?

AG: Yeah. We're gonna go back a long time. So who I am, and what do I do? I'm a graphic recorder and I'm a children's and grownup book illustrator, and I illustrate magazines as well. Think of me—I don't know whether you've ever heard of a guy called Quentin Blake.

MR: Quentin Blake, I don't know that name. It sounds familiar, but I don't know him.

AG: If I say "Charlie in the Chocolate Factory."

MR: Oh yeah.

AG: And I say Roald Dahl, and I say, the person who illustrated Roald Dahl then immediately you start to get to know who Quentin Blake is.

MR: Got it.

AG: He's just turned 90, actually.

MR: Wow.

AG: And so if you take his style and you mix it with people from the other side of the pond, 'cause obviously I'm a Britt, people from the other side of the pond from your side say, "Oh, you look just like the New Yorker." So think of me as an editorial cartoonist illustrator, and you won't be far off.

I'm also a Church of England Minister. I've been in youth and children's ministry for decades, and I plant churches and stuff, and I train people and coach people. And basically, I try and help everybody to live life in their fullest. I'm also a DJ, magician, a dad, husband, and general mad person. I do everything I can. I get bored easy.

MR: Well, you fit right in the Sketchote Army podcast and in the Sketchote community, 'cause we're all quirky. I've been reminded of that when I just came back from Laiden, from the International Sketchnote Camp there. And loved everybody. You know, we're really community minded, but we're all quirky in our own ways. So you fit right in.

AG: Fantastic. Yeah, I've kind of got this target, and next time you do something like that, I wanna be there. So I was too late to take advantage this time, but I'll be there next time.

MR: Sounds good. Well, why don't you get into, like, where did you start from? You can go back as far as when you were a little baby, I suppose if you remember.

AG: We were talking just before we started rolling, weren't we? Okay, so this will make some people either laugh or they'll be sick. If you're eating at the moment, do stop. Have you finished your mouthful? Excellent. Good. Right. Because my mother tells me very reliably that the first time that I really I got into art was when I was in my cot when I was about two years old. In fact, probably younger, actually, I was just a toddler. So maybe about 18 months.

And when she put me down for a nap in the afternoon, I would take the contents of my nappy and I would smear them all over the walls. So, you know, it is early start in my expressionist period using brown pigment and various shades. So funny enough, she stopped putting me down after that.

I guess then I mean, I've only just in the last what? In the last five years, been diagnosed having autism or being autistic. I'm actually autistic because we prefer Asperger's or neuros-spicy. Which makes sense for a lot of the things which I'm gonna talk to you about.

But I couldn't sleep as a little kid, which is quite normal for autistic people, you know? And so, I'd wake up about 1:00 in the morning and I'd have pens and paper, and I remember so often I just would be sound asleep for about four hours. So I'd get my pens and paper and I would just draw continually for about four hours. And then mum would come in and she'd see me that I'd be falling asleep with pens and paper all over my bed.

And so, the next thing would happen the next night. So I obsessively drew, and that's kind of like always been my story. I couldn't draw that well. I used to always be jealous of my friends at school. They could draw really well and I couldn't, probably bit rubbish till I was about 14.

And then it started with me copying Bino. Have you ever come across Bino? If I say comic, the problem is, it's sort of like around the world, comics are kind of like superheroes and stuff. In the UK, we talk about comics and we're talking about sort of like cartoon characters in strip cartoons you might call them.

MR: Yes. We had this in the newspaper. I don't know Bino, though. That's not a character I know.

AG: Right. Okay. So it is that kind of style. So Dan de Bino UK people know exactly what I'm talking about. So think for you, it's the kind of simplistic style that you get with peanuts.

MR: Yes.

AG: And we have magazines full of that which is just fun. And I used to copy Backstreet Kids which people will know the name of over here, and I could get it so that I could draw them without needing to reference them. And so, I just did that and, you know, covered all my school books in Backstreet Kids and other illustrations.

And then you weren't supposed to, I went to a Deb Posh private school, and you weren't supposed to do that. And I did. It wasn't naughty, but I just didn't get told off for it 'cause they like recipe me work as well. So I drew all of this stuff. And then when I was 14 like I said, I couldn't really draw. And then my little sister was born and my dad took me away. And when he took me away, he I bought a book o pencil drawing pencils.

So we just done a whole day for two or three days, and I just started drawing from that book. And suddenly, literally overnight, it clicked and I was able to draw anything I wanted in pencil, you know, realistically or not realistic, however I wanted. So the first gig came in maybe about six months after that from somebody, and she wanted a picture of Peter Rabbit. So I drew it and she paid me 10 quid. I thought, "Ooh, this is easy."

MR: Wow.

AG: So, yeah. So back in the '80s, 10 quids is nothing to be shy of. So I did bits and pieces here and there, but I really wanted to be an editorial cartoonist. So when I got married in my early 20s, I self-study the style of how to be an editorial cartoonist. And it went really well. But I ended up working so hard. I was also working for a company called British Gas. And it was a regional office, and this, it was the size of a warehouse and it was just open-plan office space.

So, if you can imagine what that was like and what that did, I was right in the middle of it, what that did to an autistic brain, not knowing it was autistic at the time. And I was trying to get this editorial cartoon business going. And we didn't have internet in those days. Do you remember that?

MR: Yeah.

AG: We didn't have internet, did we?

MR: I was there.

AG: In the very early '90s, I had a fax machine. I was dead proud. And that was it, that's all we had. And so, trying to get the business in was really hard. And although I sort of like did—you know, the newspaper did pick up for a couple of issues, that was it. And I ended up burning out really badly.

And during that period, I couldn't have time off work with stress, somebody came to me and said, "Look, you know, find out what God really wants you to do." So I'm a Christian, like I said, I'm a minister. They said, "Find out what God really wants you to do." Within two weeks I'd worked out that really, "I need you to put the pens down," and just say, "God, what do you want me to do?" And within two weeks somebody came back and said, "Why don't you train for youth and children's ministry?"

So it's like, "Hmm, all right then that sounds right." And it came from so many places, people saying it, they didn't know each other, so I thought, "We're gonna do it." So dived into going training and I sat in the lecture theater, listening to theology. And it's sort of like getting fairly bored. 'Cause theology is quite a boring thing, really.

While everybody was taking notes, I didn't know taking notes. I learned how to mind map, I also learned memory techniques, and all sorts of other things. Just trained myself in the whole lot. But then when the thing interesting was happening, I just started drawing.

And so, I didn't draw anything particular. I just drew in the same way as I used to drawing my school books. So that was great. And then I found myself drawing a little bit for the college 'cause they wanted little bits and pieces done. So that was okay. Then I went to go and be a youth and children's minister, and I found that the art stuff that I did then became what I was doing as part of my ministry.

And so, that lasted for, I think about, we'll do rough figures about 10 years, and then I went to go and work for a Christian publishing organization. So they got about 10 million, 12 million pound turnover. And they did publishing as well as training people. So I trained people around the country and in the Northwest of the UK in working with young people and children and how to do it and how to help them get a life of fullness and all the rest of it.

And they found out that I could draw. And so, they said, "Would you mind drawing a book for us?" "Oh, that's quite good. Draw a book for you". And they paid nicely for them. Oh, that's all right, isn't it? And they said, "Would you do some more drawing for us?" And so, I had this side hustle of drawing at the same time, and it all went through their book. So I didn't have to do any bookkeeping or anything. And that was very nice.

At the same time, as we drew to the end of, I was doing more and more drawing for them. I was also learning how to be an entrepreneur and developing those skills of running businesses, but also lots of side hustles. So I got things going and I was trading mp3 players and all sorts of other things on the side. It was great.

And then I got a calling to go and get a dog collar. So, you know, it's the whole dog collary thing to be a church minister besides just a youth and children's worker. So, for me, it wasn't really an upgrade, it was just a development of ministry, and I was doing something else, but I was gonna become a pioneer, an ordained pioneer minister, which means planting churches in interesting places like coffee shops and things like that, rather than just going running normal churches.

And I knew that I didn't really wanna be in full-time, paid ministry because it ties you to the church. And I'm a minister for people who don't go to church. That's the kind of person I am. Anyway, I trained in theology. And while I was doing it, I went back to drawing at the back of the lecture theaters 'cause it's boring. I could write the papers, no problem, do the study and stuff.

And then one day, 'cause I mean it was pretty small, things that we were doing, small cohort. It was only about 40 of us. And we were just really good friends. So I was about 40-odd at the time. And I was really good friends with the lecturers, you know, 'cause we all just got on together. It is that kind of format when you're doing this kind of training.

And one of the lecture one day turned around, he said, "Would you draw what I say?" I said, "Sorry, what?" He said, "Would you draw what I say?" He said, "Well, yeah, instead of just drawing," he said, "I'd love to see what it looked like if you drew what I said." Oh, all right. So I drew what he said and he's like, "Oh, that's quite interesting."

So I then just started drawing what people said. Instead of drawing sort of like—I mean, I dunno whether people are familiar with what you might call Christian art drawn and painted in sermons and the like, but it's usually quite squirly-worrly. And it's usually got hands in it and it's usually got a dove in it. Sometimes it might be the story and that's about it and it's art.

But I wanted something else. So I started drawing art and then combining key phrases in there and making it part of the arts and doing that. And I just built on that. And then when I was ordained and I was a trainee vicar, if you like. So the best way of putting it, so cure it. Sometimes I wasn't lecturing , I wasn't actually leading, and I wasn't preaching.

So I'd sit there bored again. I can't stand church. I'm a minister who hates church I get bored. That's why people love my sermons and my talks and the way I lead church 'cause I get bored quicker than anybody else does. So that's great.

So I sat there drawing instead, and because I got in this habit of drawing what people said, I started drawing the sermon. And I would start by seeing, so we'd have a bit of a Bible story or a Bible passage, and then I'd draw the outline of that. Then I'd start putting in smaller elements of what was preached on within that bigger picture and where necessary adding words.

Great. Did that for about 10 years, you know. And then I found that throughout all of this, with the theology side of things and stuff, people started saying, "Andy, can we have a copy, please? It'll help us remember." Brilliant. There's no skin off my nose, you know. So they'd take copies, then they'd share them around and all the rest of it.

I did another job coming out of that because, after 10 years of church planting and all the rest of it, that was great. And then I decided that it was time to start moving away from being a paid minister. And I wanted to achieve being a self-supporting minister so that I wasn't tied to the whole—there's quite a lot of management involved in the Church of England now because you have to look after more than one church.

And so, there's a huge number of meetings, and everything else. I thought that's not me. I have to sort of like, be freelance, if you like. So little bit of prayer, "What do you want me to do, God?" And answer came back looking to try and work towards being self-employed and stuff. And then what should I do? You know, be an illustrator. I'm not sure I wanna be an illustrator again.

And then within two weeks of this conversation somebody came to me and said, "Andy, you don't remember me from college days 20 years ago. We were in the year below you. We've just found you on Facebook. Do you still draw pictures?" Well, oddly enough, "Yes. I've just started getting back into drawing pictures and being paid for it." "Oh, great. Could you illustrate our book for us, please?" " Don't wanna Illustrate books."

Spoke to a mate of mine. He turned around, he said, "You gotta illustrate." He said, "You can do whatever God sends you." Oh, all right then. Okay, fair enough. I did this one book, and it's not stopped ever since.

MR: One thing leads to another.

AG: Yeah. Slowly the price has gone up. Every time I've finished one book, another book—I mean, I've got, I think it's eight projects sitting on my desk at the moment of books people want illustrating. It's a nightmare. Anyway, can't complain. So what happened was, though that as I got out of this, so this was what? This was five years back. And I dropped down to working for the Southwest of England, training people in churches and to talk about their faith. Fun enough.

But carried on training people. And I've got a way of coaching and a way of styling how I train people. It's all the same thing. It's selling them the idea that they can actually do it. It's great. And so I can do that. During this time, I was illustrating more and more books. And then September last year, I realized that I'd started—the grant funding was running out this coming summer. So the summer is just gone.

And I realized I'd have to leave even earlier than I thought before the money ran out. So I said to the guy who was my line manager at the time, I said, "In one week I've turned down 3000 pounds worth of money. I can't keep going like this. I think I have to leave early." He's a brilliant Christian man. He said, "I think you do actually excellent and we'll help you to do it." What? So like, oh great. All right. Okay.

And I thought, "Well, I wanna see what God wants as well. So I said, "Okay, God, what do you want me to do next?" So illustration itself, I mean, I developed this very fast illustration style because the way of making ends, meters and book illustrates is you've gotta be fast and people have to like what you do.

So I'd really gone to this point of really refining my art style into a very, very posh art style, which took ages to do, and was very pretty. And people said, "Yeah, that's really nice. I really like that." And I get paid for it. But it wasn't quick enough to make an income.

And then we were just finished with the diocese, paid for us all to do coaching. Coaching, training. So I'm a trained coach. I'm not a coach, qualified coach 'cause I've not done the hours. But I'm a trained coach 'cause I've done the training. So take it as you leave it. So don't call yourself a coach, but you know how to do it.

And during that time, we had to practice coaching each other. And there were two really significant things that came up. One of them we'll might mention later, which is something about phrasing coaching. So it would be good to come back to that because I think it's a top tip is that one.

MR: Okay.

AG: But the other thing was I was trying to work out how to make ends meet. And I was in this coaching session with this bloke. He was coaching me, I was just having fun. And I said I have to work out how to make ends meet. It was then I realized that I had to dump my style of being very posh and fast, very posh and nice and digging ages, charge more, much more, and drop back to the fastest speed that I developed when I was 18, 19, 20 years old of this editorial cartoonist.

And it just so happened that the 20 years previously—20 years? 15 years previously, as I'd been doing the book illustrations, I got so fed up with posh illustrations what basically burned me out a bit on the illustration, that I picked up a book and this is gonna be one of my recommended books by a guy called Quentin Blake to basically for the people who couldn't draw.

Now I could draw, but what it did is it was so close to my style and I hadn't realized, I thought, well I'll read this book and you're drawing in it at the same time. It's brilliant. And you draw and you read at the same time, you draw what he tells you to. By the end of it, within 36 hours, my style had completely relaxed, and was 20 times faster than it was before.

And I started putting it on Facebook and people weren't just going, "Oh, that's nice." They went, "Oh wow, that's so awesome." And I'm like going, okay, faster, people think it's awesome and I can charge more, brilliant. So that became my style. And you'll see how that's relevant in a minute because 12 months ago, not sure what I was gonna do next. I of course start praying, saying, "God, what should I do next?" You know, and said, "Oh, I give up. I've got no idea what to do next. It's your job."

And within 24 hours, somebody gave me a call. I called him Matt Pritchard, and he gave me a phone call. And he said, "Andy", he said, "You drew for me 15 years ago a logo." And we've been in touch ever since. We're both magicians. He's much better than me. Much better. He's a member of the magic circle. I'm not. And he said, "Can you draw conversations?"

I said, "Oh, don't know. I've got no idea. What do you mean?" And he said, "Well, have a look at the Bible project." So I went on there and said, well that's the kind of style. Okay, right. And he said, "Do you wanna have a go?" And I said, "Well, let me look into it and see if anybody else has done it now."

So I thought, what could he refer to? And I thought, well, what is it? lsn't it a live illustration, maybe? So I looked it up and went, "Hang on, it's got a name. It's called graphic recording. I've been doing this for the last 30 years. What? And it's an industry. This is so cool."

So I jumped in with Benjamin Felis' course 'cause I had no idea. So I like to learn fast. And because of doing all the artwork, and so, I built up some money in the business for training and stuff. So I bought his course. So props to Ben on that one. His main thing was that really helped me was the reference to three books. To a few books.

And I saw a line finally between a TED Talk and what he was saying, how it was done. And I went, "Ah, I do do this already. It's not just called drawing in church, which I've called it for years. I can do it." So I've not even come across you by that point, you know?

MR: Sure.

AG: More conversation with Matt, and I said, "I'd like to do it on iPad 'cause then we can try it out and just link it through a video projector." And he said, "Well, I think it should be done on paper or on canvases or something. So I looked around, and well, you could do it on a big foam core board, but I thought, well, the people we are doing it with, were gonna be young people talking about faith and science and the link between the two. And I thought I can't draw it like that for you. Because they would feel guilty if they threw it away. Anyway, I said, we'll do it on iPad.

Anyway, it was in January just gone that I was going to a conference, and I thought, "Well, I know they won't mind if I sit at the back. But I wanna do it a bit more than just on a piece of paper. I don't wanna draw an iPad. I can do it on paper and see what it feels like." So I got myself four pieces of foam cardboard, which is about A1 size on its side.

But then I also got the paper and I used the foam call board as my board, a real lightweight board, and my previous easel of broker. So I bought myself a new easel dropped another a hundred quid on market pens and some paper. And I said to the guy, the tech guys that back said, do you mind if I just sit at the back with you? You know, it wasn't a big space. Only about 200 people there for a three-day conference and said, "Can I just sit at the back with you and just draw?" Anyway, so I did.

Quick cut ahead, the result of doing that means that the main people presenting then found out what I was doing. The fact that I could draw, become really good friends. And I've ended illustrating for them and recouping about 5,000 pounds worth of work of them.

That's beside the point, the graphic recording stuff. I've done books for them. They go internationally. So I'm an international illustrator, you see. I was at the back drawing and then somebody came up and saw what I was doing and they went, "Oh wow. Can I take a photo? I thought you were just doing normal Christian art, like everybody else's but this is different."

And then I even had one person—so people start taking photographs and I've got these small pieces of paper, I say small, but A1s or landscape all over the place being drawn in this style. I do focus on the art first, but I was trying at that point to say it was kind of like there was a bit of a popcorn method going on. But I wanted it to be artistic.

By that point, I hadn't quite managed to smush these two things together. You know, the style I used to do together with actually sort like trying to get data that people can hook in with. So I was like, "Oh, my word. Okay, yeah short Cushing photographs. For an artist, people taking photographs of your work is like, that's the best ever. You don't care about selling if you just, I mean, you want to sell stuff. You have people taking photographs, and you get excited.

And then I asked this lady, come up, looked at this picture, and burst into tears. I thought, "By it, what I done now." And I said, why? She said, "I can never follow anything that's said in these sort of things. And I feel so guilty about it. What you have done have made it so that I can remember what was said."

MR: Wow.

AG: And one of the things that my friend guided me on—well another friend actually, I got too many millionaire friends and one particular millionaire friend said to me, when I was trying to work out what to do, he said, "Well, how does your art serve people?" And I said, "Well, I dunno, really."

And digging around then we discovered that doing the art as the books is I help people tell their stories. So that's my tagline. But I realized that this person, I'd done an act of translation and later I found it was actually even similar to the way she reacted, was even similar to someone you get sign language if they're hard of hearing or deaf or deafened, because some people, they can't manage to remember what's said.

And so, doing this meant that it wasn't just exciting, and oh, look, my words have been drawn. And more recently I've discovered a better word is interface. But we can come onto that one as well if you like. So anyway, so I thought, well, I've never managed to do nine hours a day for three days on an iPad. It would've done my head in. So we're gonna do paper. So I phoned up, I can't remember whether you've had him on or not, but Tom from Inky thinking?

MR: No, I need to have him on. I need to have him.

AG: He would be cool. He'll be cool. I'll link you later at another point.

MR: Okay.

AG: But they're one of two suppliers in the UK for Neuland products.

MR: Hmm. Okay.

AG: And I spoke to them, and he was really good. And after talking to him, I decided I was gonna actually invest in the graphic wall.

MR: Yeah. I've heard that.

AG: LW hyphen X, you know, this sounds very cool, but you can expand it in all sorts of things. I mean, I've got now got five panels, so I go out four meters by one and a quarter-meters tall. So this thing's huge. I've even got the winders on the ends now, so I can do 25 meters nonstop, which is just so cool.

MR: And for those who are watching or listening who don't know what the GraphicWally, I think is, was the name of it. It's like—

AG: Well, the GraphicWally is the little thing.

MR: It's the little one. Okay.

AG: It's quite narrow and small. I'm talking about the free-standing job basically.

MR: Big guy.

AG: If you take a flip chart board and basically, you just stack them for 4 meters.

MR: Five

AG: It's five. Yeah. That's what I've got. All right. And it just keeps going. It's awesome.

MR: And I think it's got like a winder, isn't it? A roll of paper that you can continuously
wind it.

AG: It doesn’t unless you drop the funds on the new stuff, so.

MR: Oh, okay.

AR: So be aware this stuff isn't cheap. I think I've dropped about five grand on equipment so far.

MR: Yeah. I think that's the key of the GraphicWally, is it's a smaller one. I think they intended it for a camera or something, right?

AR: Yeah, that's right.

MR: Because I know Ben Felis has it, and it's got like a crank. It's got a roll of paper on one side and a roll on the other. And it's sort of like old school film, you know, you would drag it across and take pictures.

AG: Yeah. Well, if you 10 x that, literally 10 x it, you get what I've got now.

MR: Oh God.

AR: And the thing is that, I mean, this is a top tip for anyone wanting to go into graphic recording, go with looking like you know what you need to do. Now apparently, I might be wrong on this, but apparently Disney discovered this. So I go full lo place. So Disney they had a little bit of full feedback.

Apparently, Disney, Europe, I think had some feedback. The people thought that it was dirty. So what they did, they got more cleaners in and people still said it was dirty. So they then put their cleaners in yellow jackets. Everybody said it was clean. One of the things that I've established in the past is a Ballgame Cafe. So a community Ballgame Cafe.

I mean, I made the money through affiliate processes at Amazon to buy the ballgame for the Ballgame Café. Is great, and just left it there. So, community thing. But we recognized that if people came along to the cafe for the first time, 'cause the popup cafe and looked, I went, "Oh, look, you've got just a few games, haven't you?" They won't be impressed. In the end, we've got about 3000 pounds worth of games all through me raising entrepreneurial funds. So it all works.

And raise these funds to buy all these games. So people came in, it's like a sweet shop, they went, "Oh wow." Got excited and then stayed. And it wouldn't have been in the same way. And, you know, take the tip from Disney. I mean, I heard about Disney later, but I've always had since then, make it look like you know what you're doing by having the right kit.

The idea of all the gear and no idea isn't quite true. Because actually, if you go in and you've just got sort of like ropey stuff, you can have all the ideas and the, the professionals will look and go, yeah, I haven't got a clue. And so, you won't have that start of a 10 of them getting that first impression. You have a good set of kit, and they will look and say, you know what you're doing, and therefore they'll come with that mindset.

It is called the Pygmalion Effect, I do believe. So look that one up. Quite interesting. So anyway, so I invested in this kit, went and did this gig elsewhere in the country for my mate Matt. And we first of all worked with those from primary school age up to about 11 years old. And it was brilliant. It was great fun.

And then we did it again, and this time with teenagers. And the teenagers got well into the conversations. It was really deep, it was a really heavy day that they were talking about, science and faith and really digging deep.

I mean, they did heavy lifting. And I just drew it. It was a bit more text than I liked on it, but it didn't matter. And we ended up with this really big board of that particular one was three and a half meters long with all of their conversations throughout the whole day. And illustrated all illustrated. And at the end of it, these 16, 17-year-olds came up and photographed their own work.

MR: Wow.

AG: And it's like, hang on a minute, you know, you have done really heavy lifting and you've been excited about taking photographs of this work at the end of the day. And the holy grail of a young person's phone is their photo albums. And it's like, I don't believe this. So it kind of like went on from there. Then I started drawing for different people and carrying on sort of like, 'cause I mean, once you've invested, I mean, at that point it was about 2000 pounds.

MR: Now you have to use that stuff.

AG: Yeah. I've gotta use it. You know, even if it just benefits people. And I discovered I started putting things on LinkedIn about, you know, sort of like what I was discovering on the way through learning stuff still out, you know, building up relationships with a number of people. So, you know, Grant was one of those people on the way through and Patty as well.

And then there were other people. A guy called James Duro. Brilliant, brilliant chap. He worked in South Africa. He's just wonderful, wonderful man. And so, he's been doing it for 25 years. And Dario, I know you've had Dario on.

MR: Of course, yeah. Dario. I've had in on, yeah.

AG: Yeah. You've had him on. And he was just like really helpful. I didn't take part in his course. He just helped, which is just brilliant, you know?

MR: Yeah.

AG: So at some point I gonna be jumping in with him just to just pay for his course, say thank you for everything he's helped me with for free, you know?

MR: Yeah.

AG: And it was just been a right old journey. So in one sense, I've been doing this thing for 20, 30 years, and in another sense, I've been doing it for 12 months, which is bizarre. But I think for me, the most exciting thing was, you know, I did a very big gig on Thursday. So like just this last Thursday, gone, and they had sort of like these major, I mean, you've probably heard of BP and maybe Iceland. I dunno if you've heard of Iceland.

MR: Yeah.

AG: They had those kinds of people, really top-level people, and my top-level managers there at the same time. And there's a guy there from I won't say which big company it was, but the feedback you gave, I'm just gonna read this to you 'cause this actually kind of like encapsulates everything I'm trying to do. So remember, I'm trying to make art. So I'm coming from an artist's point of view. I'm coming from an artist's perspective rather than I'm trying to communicate.

And we can talk about, actually no, you do do art. Don't care what everybody says about how we are not an artist. Yes, you are. And I'll tell you why. But this is what this guy said to me. He said, okay. So he said this, "What became more apparent to me through the day with the benefit of using illustration to help capture and enhance the message, creating a new perspective, and helping people make necessary connections to understand the story."

So this was a day of virtual, nothing but data. And I was thinking, "How do I illustrate data?" And pictures were forming, so I just drew them. He said, "And although individuals may have taken away something different, it highlighted to me that a different perception of reality is often needed. People of the nervous system of any organization. Yet often the importance of people, their perception of reality and how they connect everything together is underestimated."

So what I do is I turn what people are saying into art. I will use as few words as possible to make it make sense so that it creates a bit of a dissonance. People have to solve the puzzle. Because when you solve puzzles, you get endorphins. You then, this is how Wordle works. You then share it with somebody next. You say, oh, I solved it. And they go, oh, I've solved it as well. And then they talk about it. Then endorphins work and community works, and then it becomes human.

And I realized at that point that from what I got the other day, I thought, that's what I'm doing. It's is interpretation, but even more so, it's interface between data and information, and even if it's told in story and creating an interface between that and people who are listening and watching, and it's making it more human.

So in a world of AI, when we're going faster and faster towards AI, me going in with my analog tools of paper on purpose, 'cause it's a choice I've made, makes it so that it makes that stuff more human. And the more human we can make things, I think that's the way forward for the future.

MR: I would think that because it's physical and it becomes more visceral, right? Like if you had done this on an iPad and even broadcast it on the same size screen, it might've had a similar impact, but there's something about that physical, like you can go up and touch it. Like those kids, those teenage kids can go up and touch their words that were drawn by you and maybe they can even feel the ink, right?

You know, like theres something tangible about it, right? Because the other thing is so much of our world is intangible, right? It's these photons and pixels and bits that we have control of, but they can change or they can disappear at any moment. And that's aren't real are real.

AG: One of real the big influences was when we had when Australian side paper or digital paper or digital. The team who's doing the school's work stuff sent me through one of their promo videos. And on it, one of the teachers, the head teachers from a previous session had said, what I love about this and this wasn't my drawing or anything else, this was pre-me getting involved, says that we spend so much of our time on iPads and screens to have the kids be able to come in and talk in and explore in an analog way. Is fantastic.

So when it was being suggested to me by one of the other team members, oh, let's just do it on iPad. It was like, but then we're just going back to the thing that the teacher said was not the unique selling thing. So I thought, I've gotta do it on paper because it has to be unique. And that's kinda like, just captured me.

I've always been, for the last 30 years, whenever the world goes in one direction, I go in the other direction on literally on purpose. So what are you all doing? We're not going digital. I'm not. So if somebody says, "Will you record this virtual? Will you do this virtual event for us digitally?" I'll go, "Nope." "We'll pay you money for it." "Nope." I'm only doing paper and I'm only doing in person. That's it. And I'm only doing it on big sheets as well. So if you don't like it, I'm not doing it.

MR: Interesting.

AR: Find your people, dig deep.

MR: There's plenty of people who will do that work and do it well. So I mean, they can't find somebody you can recommend them.

AG: I've got friends I can recommend, actually.

MR: I would think so, yeah.

AG: I do pass it on. That's if I can, anyway.

MR: It's good to know your boundaries because then you can be really clear and you can really lean into the specific elements that you've chosen to work with, right? That's pretty cool. And obviously, like you said, that you, you're not a typical churchman, right? You're the vicar for the people who don't usually go see vicars. So this fits right into your personality, I would think.

AG: Yeah. I lean into it. That and the autistic side I really lean into on purpose. And it's quite amazing how many people then talk to you about that kind of stuff and makes them realize that we've got a human face. Well, supposedly, anyway.

MR: It's funny. Your story of discovering graphic recording is not so different from my discovery of graphic recording. I started exploring Sketchnoting. I had no clue, just like you, that this whole community and "industry" existed. And this was, you know, 10, 15 years ago, I just stumbled onto it and realized, you know, the stuff I was discovering myself and building Sketchnoting totally matched the same principles that they were doing.

They simply did it large scale, in person. You know, maybe they were trying to be more neutral. A lot of graphic recorders just try to be interpreters, right? They don't leave an opinion. So yeah, that was a little bit different, but I mean, at the core of it, it was really similar.

And then, I don't know, was it 15 years ago? I was invited to come to the IFVP in Pittsburgh since I was nearby and spoke to that group and then became really good friends with lots of graphic recorders and see the relationship. But it's kind of amazing that you can have these ideas and sort of practice them and only later stumble into like, "Wow, there's like this community."

AG: Yeah. People pay for it. What?

MR: Yeah. It's pretty exciting.

AG: People pay for that. Okay, fine.

MR: I could do that.

AG: Yeah. Yeah. It's like, I don't even need to think and I get paid for it. I'm great. You know, it's awesome. It's awesome.

MR: So well, you know—

AG: I just—

MR: Go ahead.

AG: Yeah. no, I was gonna say, I mean, I mentioned earlier, didn't I? That I mean it's a big, it's a big thing. Thing for me is the whole thing about, 'cause I remember when you say, say that, so my brain really bounces between one thing and another. I think that's what really helps me to be able to do what I do.

And with you saying about IFVP, I remember, there's not that much on YouTube, you have to really dig for it. But I found one of the recordings of one from about, I think about 2017 or something, and I think it was Kelvy Bird, was saying "No, we are artists. Stop saying you are an artists. "

And I was trying to think about why is it that so many people, you know, sketch notes as well, who come across and say, oh, it's not you, we're not artists. You're, and, and I think you've got your little certificate, haven't you, saying it's okay to suck at art.

MR: Yeah, I think it's great.

AG: And I think one of the problems is that I mean, you might disagree, happy for that. The problem is that people look and say art is realism. So what they do is because they can't draw something realistically. They say, "I can't draw, so I'm rubbish and I'm not even gonna try it again." Whereas I'm trying to teach people and say, well, actually no, do you know when you do your letters in a particular way, that's as you are? If you haven't noticed, you can go and buy prints of letters and put it on a wall.

So I'm coming from a very much an artist's point of view, and I'm saying, look what art does—I discovered this in the Tate Gallery. Do you know the Tate Gallery? You're familiar with that? So it's basically, it's all modern art and stuff and made-up stuff. I say, made up. Yes, it's true. And here was a huge canvas. I'm saying huge. I mean, we are talking feet upon, feet upon feet by feet upon feet upon feet upon feet of gray canvas in this white room.

And he'd walk in, it was battleship gray. And it was like, what's the point of that? You know, why, why. So abstract art, always ask why, seeing what it does to you. So abstract art is about what's it do to you. Abstractionism is slightly different, but what's it do to you? And people are going, "No, that's a bit rubbish. That isn't it? How can that be in any gallery?"

But if you went up and you read the little plaque, the little tiny plaque next to this huge canvas, it says, "This is not saying that this is art. It is saying what does art do to the room. What does art do to the room?" So in other words, the gray canvas, it says this gray canvas wasn't here, it just be a white room. Now the gray canvas is here. What's it do to the rest of the room? Ignore the canvas.

And you had all sorts of things. You've got people having conversations, deciding what it was, and you start to realize that the aesthetic of art is that it makes people talk. It makes you think different. It has an impact. In fact, I'm always saying that art is not meant to be hidden away in a secret gallery. Art is meant to be responded to. When I do a piece of art, I say, "What do you think?" And that person says, "Well, I think this." And I go, "Oh, why do you think that?" Because it's the conversation it initiates, which is the important bit.

And I think that that's the point that when we do our graphic recordings when we do our big physical thingies, you are creating conversation. You are not trying to just sort of like having—you're creating conversation. So whether that's just in letters or images, it doesn't matter. And then you get to the point of saying, well, actually, what is art? So art is a triangle, and you've got a symbol. You've got realistic, and you've got abstract. And art falls somewhere in that little triangle somewhere.

So if you look at my style, which is like I said, New Yorker style, we're looking more about the symbol. Somewhere in the symbol artistic kind of element. And the more—sorry, symbol and realistic. And the more realistic you do something, the more people will notice problems with your picture. They'll notice it's all squiffy, whatever. But the more fun you make it, the more cartoony.

I mean, I can draw one hand bigger than another to make a point. Make a point 'cause the hand's bigger. And that's great. 'cause People say, "Oh, it's just a style, isn't it?" And they won't try and say it's wrong. So what I'm trying to say here is that you can actually draw, but just have fun with it. Don't try and worrying that away.

I haven't drawn a car that looks quite like a car. Instead you you can draw a car and say, well, if it's got these elements on it, people recognize it as a car. It's a bit like a symbolic emoji of a smiley face. It's really just a circle, two dots and a curve, and that's it. But you arrange them and compose them into the right way., it's now a smiley face.

And I think that so many people in the graphic recording and sketchnoting and visual thinking world have got it into their heads that they can't draw. And so put up these barriers saying, "I can't draw, therefore I don't do art." And not realize that actually what they need to do is say, "Actually, maybe I create art in a different way, and I could explore it."

And if they explore it and say, well, I can do art, then it might open the floodgates for them to be able to explore new spaces to go into and relax a bit. So yeah, it's one of the things I do. I coach people and train people in art as well. So, if anybody wants to know, I'll help them.

MR: That discussion came up in Laiden with my friend Ben Crothers, who's from Australia. And he was challenging, like, you know, 10 years ago when I wrote my book, my big mantra was Ideas, not art. It was positioned as so many people had baggage around art that would stop them from doing anything whatsoever. And the solution that I had at that time was, you know, let's focus on the ideas. Don't worry about the art. That was the message I was saying.

Like, you can put a few elements together and you're producing communication. And then the problem is over time, if you hold onto that, you feel like, well then I'm not an artist. Exactly what you're talking about. So we discussed that maybe the phrase could change to something more like ideas than art.

So in other words, you begin building the ideas and then eventually you realize you're kind of moving into an art space where it is art and we can learn from artists to improve and level up and keep growing. So that was something we discussed right on that same track.

AG: Yeah. And it's about just practice, keep practicing and trying ideas out. And also, I mean, one of the things which I'm interested with sharing the work which I've been developing with other graphic recorders is they give you feedback and initially find that what they're feeding back is their perspective on what it should be. One of the things about training in theology and I've done for literally decades is reflection and understanding. Reflecting, refine, reflect, refine, reflect, refine.

So I've developed now a filter process and reflection process so that I can look at a piece of work I've done and decide what needs to change. And then when you are working on something, don't try and change everything all at once and learn to do everything all at once, but instead, look and say, "Well, do you know what? I'm gonna learn to do this one bit better in my style. And then when I've learned to do that bit, I'm gonna learn to change this bit and do that over and over in the next thing."

So you're doing iteration and you iterate fast, but you just do lots of them, but then you are changing. If you want to draw cartoon characters, you know, learn to draw eyes, learn to draw ahead, what's your style of drawing head learn to draw the three-quarter view. You know, really most of the time you're only face on side on and three quarter. That's all you need to do.

Then you can do this like the clever tilting of the head and everything else. But just do those three, first of all, learn how to do it. Draw a ball, learn to draw a ball, and then do the half circley things on them. You know, it's not rocket science. It's kind of fairly simple, really.

MR: Take it a bit at a time. It seems like it is a good way to approach it and not leaving it to be overwhelmed pretty easily with the totality of what you could do. So focusing on small bits and keep on working. And then eventually it will all come together as a unit.

AR: Well, if people see my work, they get gobsmacked. They go, "Oh, you are so fast and you are so good. I can't draw anything." It's like, Yeah, that's 'cause I've developed slowly and because I'm an illustrator as well. One of the things that if you look at an athlete and they do drills, they slow it down and they go through the process. So if you watch an athlete practicing their hard link, they kinda like do this weird goose step kind of thing as they're just programming their muscles to do it.

And I think that actually if anybody wants to learn to draw really fast, go really slow and learn what it looks like really slow. Go slow, learn to construct, and then do some little sprint exercises of how quickly can you do it, and then go back and do it again. Go slow and then sprint.

MR: It's kind of a slow building process. That's really good advice.

AR: Yeah.

MR: We're almost stepping into tips, but we want to talk about tools before we get to the tips.

AR: Okay. I go all over the place.

MR: You mentioned Neuland, you mentioned the graphic wall.

AR: Yeah.

MR: Do you wanna get into like that kind of stuff? And do you do personal small scale stuff and sketchbooks with pens? Are there any tools that you, especially like?

AR: Well, I mean I will grab any bit of ground as they're called, any bit of paper or whatever. Some days I'll use pencils. Some days I'll use a ballpoint pen. It just depends what mood I'm in, you know. I like a good bit of color. I mean, you find a lot of graphic recorders they will use one, maybe two shade colors 'cause they can't flick fast. But as I've done my work and my family have looked and said, "No, we like full color best,"

So I have to draw full color. And I thought how I'm gonna draw quick enough. And then last week when I was working with a neuroscientist and he was linking together the ideas I was saying to be able to feed back to the group as we were working with these 200 people. He said, "I wonder what to do while you are drawing." I said, "I know you can be my colorist".

MR: There you go.

AR: So I drew, and then he would color for me. So, this I'm gonna have going forward. I'm gonna have somebody coloring for me 'cause it's a heck a lot easier. And I'll just put a little bit in and say, "What color do you want?" "I want that in pink". "Really? Yeah. Let's go pink." So I kinda like put really bright colors in. So I try to reflect the brand, but then I'll throw in other colors at the same time. So I work in that color spectrum 'cause I'm an artist and I love color.

MR: So, well, if you look at comics, I mean, you have the inker, you have the penciler, the inker, and the colorist. They are separate in that sense.

AR: That's where I'm coming from. We were doing tools, weren't we? Ignore the digital, I hate digital apart from when I'm doing the book. So we won't even talk about them. Procreate, you all right. You know. Oh, have you seen Procreate Dreams? That's exciting.

MR: Yeah. That's the newest one, yeah.

AR: Yeah. But no, I work in pure paper, but there's other tools as well, which I've just got. So those people who end up breaking their backs, carrying those big boards and the stands and two rolls of paper in your ski boot or your document tube or whatever. It must weigh about 10 kilos. I've just bought myself a camera bag a big 100 quid for all my marker pens. All right. So there's a top tip. You save money on big boxes and things. A camera bag is brilliant for all those marker pens and all the s spare inks and everything else.

But put all those is I've just bought for myself something called a Rock N Roller, which I think have built for gigging musicians. You get all types of them, but basically this thing drops down to about a half meter, but it'll stretch up to about a meter and a half. It's got stands on it and you can put a bag on it, a big bag with ends on it. It's like this giant Ikea trolley thing and it'll take up to 500 pounds of weight.

MR: Wow.

AG: So I can put all this in my car, I can put the little Stanley my car and put everything else into it and then wheel it all in in one go. Genius. I'm a bit proud of that. So tools, get yourself a trolley and stop wrecking your back in 'cause five boards is about 30 kilo. It hurts.

MR: Yeah. And you're gonna need your back to be performing.

AR: Oh yeah. You wreck your shoulder. So camera back and a Rock N Roller trolley to push everything in.

MR: And Neuland markers. It sounds like you're doing more with that. Yeah, the best.

AG: Yeah. Neuland markers and the biggest paper you can find and the graphic wall and all the rest of it.

MR: Cool. Well, let's shift then to tips. I think we've already got one, don't wreck your back is probably tip number zero.

AG: Yeah, I would. Very important.

MR: So I request three tips from people. And I frame it as someone's listening who maybe they're in a rut, maybe they just need a little encouragement. What would be three things you would tell that person to help them move forward?

AG: Okay, three. Right.

MR: It's not limited to three. I mean, you can go beyond three.

AG: Oh, might be going a few hundred, actually. I've go to a thousand sets. Gain contact with me, I've got some training. I hardly can't charge anything at all. Actually, I mean, at some point I was trying to come up with it with it already, but I've not managed to get round to it, but I'm gonna be putting a course together next year.

It's gonna be subscription-based 'cause the cost of entry into this world of graphic recording is huge. It's really expensive. And so, I wanted people to have a start of a 10, if they liked it, and then they can go and buy a bigger course or whatever. So that's the intro to the tips. But I would say practice, the biggest thing of all is practice. So practice going slow, practice going fast.

But one of the best things you could do, I think is find the long-form videos on YouTube. There's plenty of them. I would hate to say this, but dump Ted Talks, they're great, but they're so fast. You just feel depressed because you can't keep up with them.

MR: Can keep up, not when you're starting.

AG: Yeah, I've tried and it's like you know and some of them aren't all that good. So instead, what I suggest is go and find the long-form videos especially those based around business because then you are learning at the same time. Okay, so that's the first thing. Graphic record, the business ones. Okay.

Second tip, and I dunno if this works in Android, but it certainly works on iPhone. When you've done your practice of your business tip, right. Take a photograph of it. I mean we always just take photographs of all the work because iPhone, if you then type into search, it will search for the words that are actually on your graphic recording. Did you know that? Do you use that or not?

MR: No, I haven't used that.

AG: Which is brilliant because then it means, especially if you remember to write on the YouTube name of where you found it when you want to reference back to find the information—there are loads of things on there as well like book summaries and things. When you want to reference it, you can say, oh, I remembered that it was the name of this guy who did it. So you type it into your iPhone and then it'll bring up the graphic recording.

MR: That's pretty cool.

AG: What's more, if you say you want, if you wanted a subject on sort of like abilities. So you wanted to find out, well what is it about—lots of people I've heard recently have talked about the word ability and I've now written it a few times, right? So you type the word ability in and it brings up all the graphic recordings you've done on ability and now you can link the ideas together. So that's really useful.

And related to that is if you're gonna become a professional graphic recorder, it's stuck with me the other day. So this is new thinking. I like to give people new thinking. We are the best networkers in the world. And there's massive value in putting people who can network. But because we are going in to deal with different companies and people, we can network people together. So that's another tip.

And the final one I think we would say, which is which is very useful it's a technique which is called something about, and I got this from the coaching when we were being coached. So the way that it went was that is that you were put into partnership with somebody and you talked to them and you were told, right, "Tell them everything about what recently happened." So you tell 'em the story.

And then the other person has to tell you back everything they can remember from what you said. And you go, "No, you didn't remember everything. There's bits you missed." They said, well do it again, another story, but this time the other person's gonna summarize it into two or three sentences. And so, this time you go, oh actually you got it quite right there, but you missed this bit of this bit.

I said, right, you're gonna do it one more time with another partner. And this time you're gonna go say something about and give them one word. Okay? So you do that so you're listening and you finally realize you can't remember everything. So all that stress I try to remember you can't do. And so you just relax and let the whole ideas just merge. And then you get the kinda like this one idea that seems to almost evolve in your head. And then you go, "Is this something about this?" And you say one word and the other person goes, "Yes, that's exactly it."

And it's the weirdest feeling. When you experience this, you go, "I just felt heard." Now if you take that and apply that to graphic recording and visual note taking and sketch noting, you suddenly realize that you can use so few words, and the fewer words you use the better, which is brilliant. What I tend to do in my process is—I've seen people write on post-it notes and stick them up and stuff, and I couldn't do that.

If you get a 2B pencil, so this is the people working on graphic recording on big walls, so I have a top tip for them here. You can actually write on the wall with a pencil and from a distance of about five, six foot away, no one can see the writing, they can't see it. You write quite big, no one can see it. So you don't even need to rub it off at the end. So you write it in pencil as you're going along.

So when people start, they're often, like I'm doing today, waffle mode. They're telling stories, this is my history, it's got nothing to do with the thing they're gonna talk about. And you don't wanna capture that so you just start write it and just write out what they're saying long form if you want, just so you can remember the bits they've said. 'cause something might be relevant in the future.

And then suddenly they'll say something and they'll say it slightly slower and slightly louder and you'll go, "Ah, that's important." And then you look back at the notes and now you can take everything they've said and turn it into an image and then you're off 'cause now you're drawing at the same time as listening. So you can do that and bring all those things together. I think creates a rather exciting space.

MR: Well that's a great tip.

AG: I do apologize. That was rather a lot.

MR: I think you ended up with like five or six, which is great.

AG: Yeah, I know. We didn't limit it, so.

MR: I told you, you could go beyond three. So you know, you went however that you want.

AG: Oh, I could waffle forever, I'm afraid.

MR: Well Andy, that's been so good to have you. How would we find you? What's the best place to find you? Do you have a website? Are you on certain social media, LinkedIn?

AG: Yeah, you can find me on virtually everywhere. Well, I'll say everywhere. You can find me on Instagram, you can find me on LinkedIn, and even my website and it's onegraydot. So spell the American way. So I'm gonna spell it out for you 'cause nobody gets this right for some reason I came up with it years ago. So it's O-N-E-G-R-A-Y-D-O-T, all one word, not separated.

And it's all onegraydot.com, LinkedIn onegraydot, and so it goes on. And it's gray. So what I do is I start off with a big blank wall and I put one gray.in the center of it and I say it's no longer blank, so you can't spoil it, now it's got one gray.in it. And I say, what do we do? We connect the gray dots, just one gray dot at a time. So all links in into salesmanship.

MR: Yeah. That's pretty cool. And you know, while you were talking, I just for fun, I did a little search and brought up your Facebook page and at the top you've got an image up there. And what it reminds me of, like you said, New Yorker, for me, it reminds me of Red Bull. You know, the Red Bull gives you wings, cartoons. Have you seen these? It's exactly like that.

AG: It's all editorial cartooning you say.

MR: Yeah, exactly.

AG: So it's all sort like of the same kind of thing really fast. So yeah, best place to find me for sort of like this kind of stuff is probably on LinkedIn and Instagram.

MR: Okay. Well, of course, we always good show notes.

AG: Facebook is Rev, Andy Gray, if you really wanna know. So Facebook's Rev, Andy Gray with an A.

MR: Gotcha. And we'll of course put show notes, links to everything that can find and that we can bother Andy to send to us and put into the list. So if you're curious to see more, you can click there and check it out. Well, thank you, Andy. It's so good to have you on the show. Thanks for the influence you're having in the world and with people who maybe don't expect it and need it. Thank you so much for all that work you're doing. I really appreciate it. And thank you for being on the show and sharing your story. It's been great to have you.

AG: Well, thank you.

MR: And for everybody who's listening or watching, this is another episode of the Sketchnote Army Podcast, until next time.

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